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Iphone Bug Cellphones Apple

Proximity Sensor Presents Latest iPhone 4 Issue 446

Posted by kdawson
from the not-the-face-time-we-had-in-mind dept.
tekgoblin sends news of the latest iPhone 4 glitch being reported in user forums and elsewhere: the phone's proximity sensor seems not to be detecting nearby faces, as it is designed to do, in order to deactivate the screen during a call. The result is often unintended input. "On the iPhone 3GS, the proximity sensor was located to the left of the earpiece speaker. But that space on iPhone 4 is now occupied by the front-facing camera, and the proximity sensor is above the earpiece. What's not clear is whether the iPhone 4 screen's misbehavior is due to the new location of the sensor, or it's because Apple tweaked the sensor's responses in [some] way."
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Proximity Sensor Presents Latest iPhone 4 Issue

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  • Next please! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by LostCluster (625375) * on Monday July 05, 2010 @09:59PM (#32805472)

    Add this latest story to the antenna issue, and it's looking like Apple shipped a rotten one. You can't have a big win every time without some risk of losing once in a while. Be glad if you're holding on to an iPhone 3G(s) from last year... you got most of the good features from the new operating system while the new hardware doesn't seem ready for prime time. Give them a year to fix the problems, and we'll wait for the iPhone 4G...

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by nomadic (141991)
      The important thing is it looks cool and has the features (but only those) that Stevie thinks we're entitled to.
    • It's apple. You never buy the first generation of new or redesigned products. I like the new Mac Mini's. But I'll wait for the next update to replace mine. Same with the iPhone 4. My contract is up in December. I'll wait until then to update because they'll have these issues resolved.

    • Re:Next please! (Score:4, Insightful)

      by CAIMLAS (41445) on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:23PM (#32805658) Homepage

      I'm sorry, wait a year?

      If I get a defective product, it means one of two things:
      1) I return it
      2) If there is no way to return it within reasonable time and/or they refuse to repair the defects (significant, if advertised features don't work at all), I file as part of a class action suit

      In what world does a person not do one of the above when spending hundreds of dollars (or more) on a product - particularly a luxury product?

      A year is a significant period of time, particularly in technology. They don't get a year to fix functionality issues (and make them available to the user): they get months of first public outcry. That timeframe is less, if it makes the device close to useless.

      As for "win big every time without some risk of losing once in a while"... what do you think Apple is doing, playing the lottery? No, they're offering the (supposedly) 4th revision to their popular product line. A popular product line does not get "rebuilt" or "redesigned", it gets gradually upgraded. There is no excuse for this - and it was no doubt caused by some idiotic designer. (So much for the misnomer "Apple designs good hardware." Say what? Then why is the hardware made by everyone else, at the same price range and often lower, designed significantly better?)

      I'm not sure what a person is supposed to get when being an Apple customer these days that they can't get elsewhere, better. In the 1990s, it was pretty clear. Now, their desktops are the same architecture, based on the most common non-Windows OS (many variants of which are free), with inflated prices. Their other offerings are supposedly superior in many ways, but only because they're shackled to their worst fault - the Apple App Store.

      How in the world Apple released such a half-baked platform with a supposedly superior OS is beyond me. The superior OS makes sense - the inferior hardware does not. Just confounding. Pretty much everywhere else, the situation is the reverse: good/better hardware, with not-so-great software. Hell, even the various WinMo/Android/etc. makers manage to do that without much issue.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward
        I'm sorry, but you are a troll. A +5 informative troll with the support of the majority, but a troll nonetheless.

        Then why is the hardware made by everyone else, at the same price range and often lower, designed significantly better?

        I've owned many phones over the years, including an iPhone, and this is simply not the case. The iPhone's release raised the bar of phone design and sent everybody scrambling to compete.

        Now, their desktops are the same architecture, based on the most common non-Windows OS (many variants of which are free)...

        I'm starting to wonder if you have any actual experience with any Apple products. If you've used OS X and, say, Ubuntu, you'd know you're comparing apples and oranges. For day-to-day desktop use, they are light-

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by sammyF70 (1154563)

          I'm starting to wonder if you have any actual experience with any Apple products. If you've used OS X and, say, Ubuntu, you'd know you're comparing apples and oranges. For day-to-day desktop use, they are light-years apart.

          indeed. Ubuntu is a distribution, not an OS. But if you mean a Linux distro featuring one of the major WMs vs. OSX I will still say you are right. Working with pretty much any halfway sane distro (including my current one which is Arch Linux using Awesome WM) is a pleasure. Working with OSX, for me, was a "why-the-fuck-can't-I-do-that?" horror trip.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by kangsterizer (1698322)

            Actually, Ubuntu is an operating system and a Linux distribution too. Linux is a kernel, not an operating system.

            The operating system is composed of the kernel and all the applications necessary to run and use the system. (and sometimes -always these days- more additional applications)

            You'll notice Ubuntu is referenced as operating system for that reason (e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubuntu_(operating_system) [wikipedia.org] )

      • by initialE (758110)

        Class action suit? How naive. Someone should do a study on how well it generally works out for the consumer, the company, and the lawyers.

      • I'm talking to owners of previous iPhones who hesitated to stand in line for the new one.
      • Do you think they might mean "wait a year before buying an iPhone 4"? Hmmm?
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Dr Max (1696200)
        Is any one else sick of people telling them apple reinvented the smartphone industry. They copied the pocket pc phones, and those phones were going to get smaller, sleeker and more functional no matter who else got into the game.
    • Re:Next please! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by linumax (910946) on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:26PM (#32805694)

      Be glad if you're holding on to an iPhone 3G(s) from last year... you got most of the good features from the new operating system while the new hardware doesn't seem ready for prime time.

      Cross out 3g from that. My 3g with the measly 128MB of RAM (compared to 256 and 512 on 3GS and iPhone 4 respectively) runs extremely slow after update to iOS4. When noted this on the Apple forums I was told that technology doesn't wait for my old phone and I should upgrade and pay good money if I expect a nice phone. My 3g is less than two years old. In return for this slowdown, the only useful features that I have got are folders and multiple exchange accounts. Nothing else. Apple didn't just fail at design of the new iPhone, but also abandoned previous generations with the iOS upgrade.

      • Re:Next please! (Score:4, Interesting)

        by sqrt(2) (786011) on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:48PM (#32805846) Journal

        I'm in the same situation. iOS 4 has noticeably slowed down my 3G. My contract won't be up until early 2011, so I don't even have the option of buying an iPhone 4 for less than full retail price ($600 or $700) so I am stuck with a 3G until then. I try to look on the bright side, that when I get the chance to upgrade again I will get the next version after the iPhone 4, which will probably fix all the problems people are having. Until then, I'll suffer through the plain black background and no multitasking.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Darkness404 (1287218)
          Actually, if you are fine with the slowdown apparently there is a way to enable iPhone OS 4 features restricted for the 3Gs on a 3G (see http://lifehacker.com/5574507/how-to-enable-multitasking-and-background-wallpaper-on-your-iphone-3g-and-2nd-gen-ipod-touch [lifehacker.com] ) now I haven't used them so I can't vouch for if they work or not so your results may vary, but if you are looking for a way to enable them while waiting for a new phone, that might be a way. I think on that same site there is a link that tells how to
          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by sqrt(2) (786011)

            I have tried the jailbreak route. Even enabling the features through activating Apple's own implementations (the .plist edit to enable multitasking and wallpaper) left my phone running unacceptably slow, compared to just acceptably slow with non-jailbroken iOS 4. It also killed my battery life, and the funny thing was it wasn't even the multitasking doing it. I tried just enabling the wallpaper and I had a good 30-40% reduction in battery life while using the phone. Standby time seemed to be unaffected.

        • Re:Next please! (Score:5, Insightful)

          by TyFoN (12980) on Tuesday July 06, 2010 @12:49AM (#32806620)

          The funny is that the policies of a company leaves you with a crippled and slow device and you decides to wait for another version of the product and not switch to a competitor.

          • by sqrt(2) (786011)

            The competitors (Android would be the closest equivalent) have their own sets of problems, and hardware becoming quickly obsolete is something that you will never be able to get away from as long as you are using hardware.

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Algan (20532)

            Unfortunately, the competitors are not up to par. My AT&T contract is set to expire in August and I am seriously considering switching away from Apple's Iphone. My choices as of right now are very few: Moto Droid X, which is not yet available, and is an unknown entity, HTC Evo 4G, with a crippled battery life and crippled network (Sprint); Nexus One, which is nice but 7 months old already and starting to show its age, plus you can only get it with a contract on T-mobile and finally Nokia N900 which is a

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by mu51c10rd (187182)

              There are more options. Have you seen the Samsung Galaxy S? Also, what is crippled about Sprint's network? My coworkers all use iPhones (except one other Android user), and I have an Android phone. I find Android to be snappier, have more functionality (real multitasking, ability to download non-marketplace apps), and doesn't lock me down to ATT.

      • by 3dr (169908)

        Same here. I've also noticed lots of glitching on audio playback, where it is not only dropping out, but also playing at 1.5X normal speed.

        The frustration of it is that I kept the 3.1.3 image around but it will not reinstall. The restoration has failed every time.

      • Cross out 3g from that. My 3g with the measly 128MB of RAM (compared to 256 and 512 on 3GS and iPhone 4 respectively) runs extremely slow after update to iOS4.

        I've seen that and it is slower.

        But you do get something more than just folders, you also get all of the frameworks for iOS4. That gives developers a ton more control over things like audio and video and the camera, which you'll benefit from somewhat (though with the 3G camera not having autofocus, only marginally). iOS4 is I think a release Apple

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by yabos (719499)
        I think the RAM is the biggest issue on the 3G. If you plug it into XCode while using it, you can view the console log and apps are getting memory warnings almost non stop. I sometimes can't even listen to the iPod while opening another application and having the iPod quit. I used iOS4 since the first beta and actually beta 1 and 2 were even slower than beta 3 and the final version. Every time the iPhone 3G hits the memory limit, it slows down until it purges things from memory. This is happening a lot
    • Never be an early adopter. Wait for iPhone 5, release 2.
    • Re:Next please! (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Nysul (1816168) on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:32PM (#32805734)
      Every phone model has some problems, if you doubt this head over to the nexus one forums. I don't have any problems with my iphone 4, other than the low volume of the phone in general and that it feels way too fragile and I hope I don't accidentally break it. Heck HTC didn't even ship decent video drivers for the AT&T Tilt (it actually ran slower than previous models), the HD2 has audio/video sync issues, the nexus one/HD2 has a pink camera issue, and I'm sure the Incredible and Droid have their own problems.
      • by Idbar (1034346)
        Some stuff was properly working before. I wonder what drives them into changing stuff for worse.

        My 3G (old, I know) is now slower than ever and applications crash constantly. The iBook application takes about a minute to open and load. They crippled the GPS data that safari provides through their own geolocation API, using only AGPS, which of course provides really bad accuracy and doesn't update often.

        So the question here is. If they had a working product, why would they change for worse.

        This episod
    • Re:Next please! (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Osty (16825) on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:43PM (#32805812)

      Unfortunately many 3G and 3GS phones have trouble upgrading to iOS 4. They upgrade just fine, but then can no longer connect to the cellular data network and lose visual voicemail and MMS (phone calls and text still work). I'm surprised this story has slipped under the radar so far, since it's impacted a lot more people than the iPhone 4. There's still no official fix other than resetting your phone to factory and not applying previous backups to it ever again, but there are several community fixes of greater or lesser value (some only fix cellular data while leaving MMS and VVM broken, but the correct fix is to delete a specific file from your backup that contains the corrupted APN, reset to factory, and then reapply your modified backup and ignore the error when iTunes complains about not completing the backup).

      Apple really seems to have fucked up this time around.

  • R&D (Score:2, Insightful)

    You know, it sounds like most of these problems would have been figured out if people had tested them in the field for a few weeks before sending them to the factory. But Apple's causing people to commit suicide for losing a prototype, aggressive legal action, etc., suggests that they depend on heavy marketing and legal scare tactics rather than good engineering practices to sell a product.

    Soon it will be "Wait until they release the first service pack before you use it," or "Wait until they revise the hard

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by AHuxley (892839)
      Time for a Dell Streak and root access for all :)
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by CaptDeuce (84529)

      ...sounds like most of these problems would have been figured out if people had tested them in the field for a few weeks before sending them to the factory

      They tried to test them in the field but that guy forgot his in a bar and, well, you know the rest of the story.

    • Re:R&D (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:27PM (#32805702)

      ...suggests that they depend on heavy marketing and legal scare tactics rather than good engineering practices to sell a product.

      Yes, the iPhone, and indeed Apple's entire product line, clearly demonstrates that their engineering is far behind the competition's.

      Let me guess, you don't regularly use an iPhone or an Apple computer or OS X? But you don't want to be left out of the fervent Apple backlash that's taken over /. as of late.

      I had the original iPhone, and it was an exceptional work of engineering. I recently upgraded to the iPhone 4, and it again seems like an excellent work of engineering. I'm only speaking from personal experience, but I haven't had a problem with the antenna or a single dropped call to date. The huge success of the iPhone has placed it under an intense spotlight, and as it's the current "king of the hill," everyone's out to expose its blemishes and blow them out of proportion. As such, these critiques need to be taken with a grain of salt, and given time to see if they represent real issues among users, or anti-Apple fud.

    • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

      by Techman83 (949264)
      Apple is a legal and marketing company that occasionally designs Software and Hardware.
  • by PatHMV (701344) <post@patrickmartin.com> on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:07PM (#32805540) Homepage
    The antenna issue hasn't bothered me a bit. But this problem affects me every day. Since I got my iPhone, I haven't had one day where at least one call wasn't accidentally disconnected, muted, or interrupted by touchtones as my ear hit various buttons on the keypad. There are a couple of workarounds (use the earphones, or lock the keyboard), but those take time to establish at the beginning of the call.

    My bet is that this can be fixed with a simple software update, but I really don't see how Apple could possibly not have found this issue in their testing. Some reports I've seen suggest that the problem goes away if you put it in a case of some sort, so maybe Apple only tested it with those silly cases that made it look like a 3G when they sent it out in the wild for testing, and the case kept it from having the problem.

    And it seems to me that they could combine the proximity sensor input with the accelerometer and gyroscope inputs. When you hold the phone within a certain range of angles AND the proximity sensor reads X, then turn off the touchscreen.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      I noticed when I restored my iPhone4 with the backup data from my 3G that some of the settings were incompatible and causing network and proximity problems. A simple reset of all phone settings fixed it right up.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Maybe all of their testers were left-handed?

      But seriously, that would explain why they didn't notice the "holding the phone with the left hand" antenna issue, and given what's said above that means the proximity sensor would be at the bottom of the ear instead of the top when held against the head.

  • by bogaboga (793279) on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:23PM (#32805650)

    I think I have had enough of Apple at this point. I can guarantee that I will jump ship to HTC's EVO phone by December this year.

    Now let's wait for the Apple fanboys who will see no wrong on Apple's part.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by onefriedrice (1171917)

      Now let's wait for the Apple fanboys who will see no wrong on Apple's part.

      I don't see anyone saying that. On the contrary, just about every Apple story seems to be full of a ton of anger and vitriol, regardless of what the story is about. Maybe I don't see enough modded-down comments? Regardless, I'm sure that for every emotional fanboy there is at least one irrational hater and 50 million others who could hardly care less.

      • Regardless, I'm sure that for every emotional fanboy there is at least one irrational hater and 50 million others who could hardly care less.

        And then there's that one guy with a WinMo phone who's too busy sobbing in the corner quietly... ~

  • by bogaboga (793279) on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:30PM (#32805720)

    ...and here's why: -

    When it come to the iPhone, folks at Apple haven't told us how not to hold it wrong...so let's wait for Steve's instructions.

  • by aussersterne (212916) on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:30PM (#32805722) Homepage

    I now have an iPhone 4. Before that, I was a 3GS user. Before that, Palm Centro, Treo 680, and Treo 650.

    All I can say is that I have absolutely no complaints. Phone gives better audio quality and apparently better signal strength than my 3GS, which also rarely dropped calls and generally had little trouble accessing the 'net even though I live in NYC and supposedly ought not to have even been able to place a call, period.

    I haven't had any issues with the proximity sensor, any issues with signal loss/degredation, etc. No yellow spots, beautiful screen. The device works better than just about any other electronics device (save the 3GS) that I've bought in the last few years. It seems to me that people hold Apple to impossibly high standards compared to other electronics vendors. Few devices or even major computer items (printers, laptops, monitors) I've bought over the last few years have been defect free. Every single one of them has had issues. Many I've exchanged several times trying to get a "good one" (for example, Kensington Expert Mouse with misaligned laser so that motion isn't properly detected, or AOC LCD monitor with control panel buttons that don't register presses).

    People only get into "OMIGODSCANDAL" mode when it's Apple for some reason.

    I'm happy to say that the two Apple devices I've bought (iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4) have satisfied me enough that I'm seriously thinking of getting an iPad (despite previously thinking I wouldn't) and making my next computer a Mac rather than a Thinkpad.

    • by TubeSteak (669689)

      People only get into "OMIGODSCANDAL" mode when it's Apple for some reason.

      Apple's defining characteristic has long been their hardware/software design and usability.
      When they manage to fail at both of those missions in one item, it's a scandal.

    • by Darkness404 (1287218) on Monday July 05, 2010 @11:31PM (#32806078)

      People only get into "OMIGODSCANDAL" mode when it's Apple for some reason.

      Because its only Apple who seems to think that their products are flawless. Its only Apple who takes design over practicality. Only Apple would have designed the Apple III the way it was, and it was probably only Apple (well, cheap Chinese counterfeits aside...) who would design a product like the iPhone 4 and then say to your customers you are holding it wrong.

      Its only Apple who thinks that one product can be perfect for everyone, from the serious developer and power user to Joe Six-Pack. Other companies diversify to give each niche their own product at cheap price points.

      Yes, occasionally Apple just -gets- something right, a lot of the ideas from the iPhone were great, the implementation wasn't as good, but the idea of a great browser, captive touch-screen, and multi-touch gestures were a great idea and truly helped make the smartphones of today what they are today. But other times their implementation is just dead wrong and Apple has to "backtrack" from earlier statements to get ahead you know things like there will be no SDK for the iPhone, no copy/paste, no multi-tasking, etc.

      • by _xeno_ (155264)

        only Apple ... who would design a product like the iPhone 4 and then say to your customers you are holding it wrong.

        I dunno, I remember an old Samsung cellphone I had that came with an insert that instructed you on the proper way to hold the phone: two fingers and one thumb, keeping your palm as far away from the phone as possible. Otherwise, you'd block the internal antenna.

        Dunno how much of an issue that actually was, but the phone definitely came with instructions on the "proper" way to hold it. And this phone predates the iPhone entirely.

      • by lennier (44736) on Tuesday July 06, 2010 @12:39AM (#32806556) Homepage

        Its only Apple who takes design over practicality.

        There was a day when the word 'design' MEANT 'building things that solve practical problems in efficient ways'. You 'designed an engine' or 'designed a computer'. When you said 'design' it meant 'how a thing works'.

        Now it seems to be code for 'putting a thin layer of pretty looks on the top of someone else's actual engineering'. As in 'we need to update our phone's design - red with curved corners is so 2009, don't you think?' With the result that 'design' now seems to be the OPPOSITE of actual design: it doesn't think deeply about the purpose or materials of anything or its place in the world, it doesn't solve practical problems, at the very most it builds user interfaces - but more likely it doesn't even do that, just picks the shade of pixels on the .jpg on the skin on the theme pack.

        Can we please stop torturing the English language and get designers who know how to design things (and not just looks) again?

      • by kklein (900361) on Tuesday July 06, 2010 @12:45AM (#32806592)

        Its only Apple who thinks that one product can be perfect for everyone, from the serious developer and power user to Joe Six-Pack.

        See, I always read this on Slashdot, and then I read "I love my iPhone" everywhere else. I don't think Apple ever said they were to be all things to all people. They try to be the important things to most people. And that's how they succeed. They find out what people want to do, focus on those features and make them basically perfect and intuitive, and then disable anything that doesn't work right enough of the time or which gets in the way of the important things. I was sick of buying phones with feature lists the length of my arm--none of which worked reliably enough for me to ever really mess with them. With the iPhone, I actually use those things. I use them because they work. Every time.

        Finally, just to put this out there again: I live in Japan; I have had none of the signal/net-speed issues I hear about all over the internet. None. None. Never once a dropped call. It's not the phone; it's the network.

      • Because its only Apple who seems to think that their products are flawless.

        All products have some flaws, Apple knows that and users of Apple products know that.

        But by and large Apple does products with fewer annoying flaws. In practical use, on the new phone the signal drop thing I've only seen happen once - when I was trying to make it happen. And I've had exactly one dropped call.

        It's only Apple Haters it seems, who think that Apple users are arrogant about the products they own. Apple users simply li

      • Its only Apple who thinks that one product can be perfect for everyone, from the serious developer and power user to Joe Six-Pack. Other companies diversify to give each niche their own product at cheap price points.

        To be fair, I don't think that Apple thinks that the iPhone is perfect for everyone. It's perfect for them--the people who make it--and they think it's perfect for enough people that it's a worthwhile product to make.

        There are a lot of complaints about every company, including Apple, that I can understand. but their decision to focus on a limited product line is hardly a reason to get on them, any more than we should berate Samsung for making a mind-boggling 147 models [samsung.com].

        The folks at Apple make what t

    • FWIW re: the iPad...

      I'm a Mac laptop user and have an iPhone 3GS. I had absolutely zero interest in the iPad...but then we got one for work. I've been using it for about 2 weeks now, at home and at work (and at a conference). I love it...I was really surprised but I do.

      I DON'T think it works as a Kindle replacement, and reading ebooks in low light tires my eyes pretty quickly. It also really desperately needs iOS4 / multitasking...but even now I use it at home all the time.

  • but then, I'm a lefty. Maybe we southpaws take a hit on reception, but get a bonus on the proximity issue.

  • by JYD (996651) on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:36PM (#32805758)

    Mark me as redundant, but haven't people learned already that first-gen Apple products are suspect to major flaws? (Even though iteration-wise, this is the 4th iteration of the iPhone, of course, realistically this is a Apple product with brand new hardware and design, akin to going from the PPC Powerbooks to the Intel Macbooks).

  • by cadeon (977561) on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:37PM (#32805762)

    I can't help but to think that this bug has more to do with dropped calls than the antenna- Screen doesn't go off, so your face hits "End" ... I can see how people would see that as a drop.

    • Except for one thing: people are demonstrating the signal-loss thing holding the phone in their hands.

      I personally think that problem has more to do with the front-facing camera. The phone probably sees these people and decides they're not good looking enough to call anyone. I mean, have you seen some of the antenna complainers?
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        I cannot reproduce the signal-loss issue. I am plagued by the proximity sensor issue. And just an FYI- after the phone hangs up, it takes you back to your contacts; if the call is dropped, it tells you "call failed" and gives you a redial button.

        I hear "It's not the sensor it's ATT, lolz!!1" all the time from people who don't use iphones but feel the need to comment on them.

        So let's be clear about this: I can tell the difference between a dropped call and a call that has been ended inadvertently.

        Don't take

  • Is there any other product ever released that was more scrutinized than the iPhone 4? Unless it grants wishes, Apple should forgo any more product releases.
    • Re:More? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Darkness404 (1287218) on Monday July 05, 2010 @11:17PM (#32806008)
      Of course Apple is going to be scrutinized more than any other popular company because they limit their models to one or two. For example, lets say I want a Motorola phone with Android, I don't -have- to get a Droid, I can choose to get a Droid, Droid X, Backflip, Cliq, Devour or i1. A flaw that the Backflip has will probably not be shared with the Droid and a problem with the Droid might be addressed on the Droid X. Apple seems to think that their one phone is the phone for everyone and when it is not, people are going to attack them. Motorola isn't saying that all of their phones are for everyone, they make their own niches, someone who needs a high-end phone is not going to get a Cliq but rather get a Droid (X), someone who wants to get a smartphone on a budget also isn't going to buy the Droid X but instead might go for the i1.

      If Apple offered multiple products, they could escape scrutiny because there would be other products to fall back to if one product ended up being terrible and Apple would suffer minimal losses, but since they have a unified phone program, the flaws are much more pronounced.
      • Apple seems to think that their one phone is the phone for everyone and when it is not, people are going to attack them.

        That's not really true... Well, they do have one line of phones obviously (iPhone -> iPhone 3g -> iPhone 3gs -> iPhone4) however even today AT&T sells iPhone 3g, 3gs and 4.

  • Not just the iPhone (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Andy Smith (55346) on Monday July 05, 2010 @10:38PM (#32805770) Homepage

    I've got an HTC Desire and it too has a problem with your ear pressing on-screen buttons during calls.

    The screen can also be too sensitive to skin touches. So, for example, when the phone is in my jeans pocket, it responds to the skin of my thigh through the pocket lining. I've had to resort to the "drag your finger in a certain pattern" unlock mode to prevent the phone from making calls while it's in my pocket.

  • Caveat: I have just switched to a MacBook Pro after years of windows and linux. I love it.

    My impression is that this is the most advanced, subtle device on the market and they just dropped it into the hands of a million people. Can you imagine this sort of thing not happening? On the other hand there seems to be a major difference from past iPhone versions.

    It sounds like an interesting issue that could combine subtle aspects of different sensor device, position, electromagnetic environment, head geometry, h

  • It's a feature not a bug, my 1st gen iPhone did this.
  • by crossword.bob (918209) on Monday July 05, 2010 @11:57PM (#32806230)
    I have seen it written somewhere that the proximity sensor issue affects only those who did a "restore from backup" to transfer their settings from an older phone. I can't verify this beyond stating that, having read this, I activated as a new phone, the transferred settings manually. I have had no proximity sensor problems. Now before I get jumped on for defending Apple, let me just say that, yes, this is a problem, and they should sort it asap. But I figured I'd share a potential workaround in case it helps someone.
  • I got my iPhone 4 last Thursday. I am left-handed and have had no dropped calls or reduction in signal strength. I have no case or bumper (the case is due to arrive in the mail this week). Quite the contrary, this iPhone gets much better reception than my previous iPhones. I haven't had any problems with the proximity sensor. Everything works as advertised, and I'm extremely happy with it. Being an iPhone owner since Day 1 of the first model, this is the first time I can say I am completely, 100% sati

  • Its sounding more and more like the new iphone is a mini ipad, not a phone at all. I've never figured it out myself. I'm old school I guess, I use my phone to make phone calls, and its all I do with it. I want it small, lightweight, good battery life and good reception. I kept my nokia for 5 years and going on 4 years with my moto. Both satisfied the reqmt. Meanwhile a friend of mine has an iphone and she hits mute somehow almost every conversation. Really I don't know how she stands it, but I guess being

  • by mikeskup (1337) on Tuesday July 06, 2010 @02:25AM (#32807228) Homepage Journal

    this seems to be an issue with ios4 (happens on 3gs also) to do with importing from old phone sensor settings on restore...

    after some searching found that

      the fix was to go into settings/general/reset all/ then it recalibrated the sensor....

    have had zero issues since

  • I have an iPhone 3G. I updated my iPhone to iOS 4. Now I have the same proximity sensor issue; I was on a conference call the other day and kept hearing a beep before I realized that my face was pressing the "3" on the keypad. I had to hold the phone like Steve does in order to make it stop ;-).

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