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Operating Systems Apple

Apple Unveils macOS 10.14 Mojave With Dark Mode and Finder Photo Tools (venturebeat.com) 99

Alongside iOS 12, at its developer conference WWDC on Monday, Apple also unveiled macOS 10.14 -- named "Mojave" -- the upcoming software update for the company's laptop and desktops lineups. The headline feature of macOS 10.14 is dark mode, a feature that people who work during late hours might appreciate. VentureBeat: A new Mojave feature called Dynamic Desktop can subtly change the desktop throughout the day, morning, afternoon, and evening. There's also Desktop Stacks, which can automatically clean up a messy desktop by arranging desktop contents into stacks based on content, date, or tag. Gallery View in the Finder lets you see content in a Photos-like display, including full metadata from cameras that can appear in an optional second sidebar; you can rotate photos and do basic automation of Actions within the Finder. The macOS screenshot creation tool has been expanded, as well, to enable instant creation of screengrabbed videos from current screen content.

Continuity has been expanded with Continuity Camera, leveraging your phone's camera to instantly add photos and scans to programs that request them. It also includes a Mac version of the Apple News aggregation app that debuted on iOS two years ago, including the Stocks feature and new sidebar that were shown off for the updated iPad version of News earlier in the Keynote. Voice Memos is also being brought to the Mac, as is Home, the HomeKit app from iOS. Apple also announced a collection of heightened security features for macOS, including protection by default of camera access, microphone access, your mail database, message history, and other private data.
Apple has also redesigned the App Store, and is bringing favicons to Safari tabs.

Apple Unveils macOS 10.14 Mojave With Dark Mode and Finder Photo Tools

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  • I thought all the OS X names used Cats. Now are the Deserts?

    I guess I havn't cared about OS X in many years.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 04, 2018 @03:24PM (#56726810)

      Dont feel bad. apple hasn't cared about osx for quite a while either.

      • I kinda stopped caring when Apple Stopped caring. The Last Mac that I got was 12 years ago, it was my primary laptop for about 6 years, and I am on my second one.

        After iOS and the iDevices became apples money maker. The Macintosh lineup has gotten rather bland. They are still fine systems, but nothing really wows me, like they use to. Compared to a Asus Zenbook or even a Dell XPS I am not seeing anything really big for the differences.

        Even the Apple style of laptops seems to be about the same as a 2002 po

        • by vakuona ( 788200 )

          Even the Apple style of laptops seems to be about the same as a 2002 powerbook. Thinner lighter, But still a gray metal laptop.

          There are many things one could complain about Apple's laptops, but their design is still very good. Maybe making the same design for such a long time has allowed it to be super optimised, and removed many of the kinks in it. They would need very good reasons to change it in my opinion.

          • Even the Apple style of laptops seems to be about the same as a 2002 powerbook. Thinner lighter, But still a gray metal laptop.

            There are many things one could complain about Apple's laptops, but their design is still very good. Maybe making the same design for such a long time has allowed it to be super optimised, and removed many of the kinks in it. They would need very good reasons to change it in my opinion.

            Exactly.

            Just like Volkswagen made essentially the same Beetle for a few DECADES, and Volvo made essentially the same car for around 6 years, sometimes a good design only needs the occasionally tweaking.

            • by Bongo ( 13261 )

              Yes, I recall all the useless design "styling" applied to PC cases and laptops, and it was so often just arbitrary rubbish.

              Apple is one of the few who came at it like a real industrial designer. Sure there were some big mistakes, but there's notable successes. The MacBook Air has gone TEN years. I have a bunch lying around at work, and at a glance, you cannot tell how old any of them are.

              And it would have gone longer if Apple hadn't desired a newer design.

              Anyway, big caveat is when one needs to purchase sol

              • Yes, I recall all the useless design "styling" applied to PC cases and laptops, and it was so often just arbitrary rubbish.

                Apple is one of the few who came at it like a real industrial designer. Sure there were some big mistakes, but there's notable successes. The MacBook Air has gone TEN years. I have a bunch lying around at work, and at a glance, you cannot tell how old any of them are.

                And it would have gone longer if Apple hadn't desired a newer design.

                Anyway, big caveat is when one needs to purchase solely based on specs. But for many people that's not a priority.

                But all that arbitrary styling rubbish, it was so Rococo.
                Apple is an exemplary Modernist by comparison.

                Yep. You can only tell the new MacBook Pros because their Apple Logo doesn't light up. Or if they are Space Grey. But my 2012 MacBook Pro looks pretty much like any of the "Unibody" versions, until you start inspecting the port-compliment.

    • What did you expect to happen after coming down from the High Sierra? Munchies?
    • by dgatwood ( 11270 ) on Monday June 04, 2018 @03:37PM (#56726910) Homepage Journal

      I thought all the OS X names used Cats. Now are the Deserts?

      Someone thought Google naming Android versions after desserts was a great idea, but the message got mangled by iOS's autocorrect on its way to upper management.

    • by Merk42 ( 1906718 )
      They changed to mountain ranges with OS X 10.9 Mavericks (followed by OS X 10.10 Yosemite, OS X 10.11 El Capitan, macOS 10.2 Sierra, and macOS10.13 High Sierra).
      You'll note they also went from "OS X" to "macOS".

      I don't know of a "Mojave" mountain range, though.
      • They changed to mountain ranges with OS X 10.9 Mavericks

        "Mavericks" was named after a popular surfing location in California. Then they moved on to various Yosemite Park features, and most recently Humphrey Bogart movies.

    • I thought all the OS X names used Cats. Now are the Deserts?

      Actually the current series is California place names. In focus groups, Mojave won out over Straight Outta Compton and Napa Wildfire Estate Reserve 2018.

    • by antdude ( 79039 )

      More like famous places on Earth. According to https://www.macworld.co.uk/fea... [macworld.co.uk], cat names stopped after OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion. Also, notice "Mac OS X" was changed to "mac OS" between OS X 10.11: El Capitan and macOS 10.12: Sierra. I didn't like going back to its original classic "mac OS" name. I was fine with "Mac OS X"!

  • I hate Dark Mode.

    Why is it all the sudden more popular than brighter and sunnier?

    • Nobody is forcing you to use Dark Mode. But for those of us who want it, it's a nice option.

      • Because it makes media editing easier when your eyes can focus on your work and the toolbars are dimmer. Most media workers will prefer it, as do coders who have to stare at a bright screen for hours and hours, this is much easier if the background is dark than bright for fatigue.

      • by dgatwood ( 11270 )

        Great for a media center PC, though I'd imagine most folks have moved on to Apple TV by now.

    • I hate Dark Mode

      I thought that algorithms weren't allowed to discriminate.

  • I am a long time MacOS user, and currently using 10.11 El Capitan (and even that upgrade was forced on my by Turbotax). High Sierra looks undesirable (due to APFS and nag popups trying to run 32 bit software, which I cannot replace). This one does not seem to add anything of value either.
    It may be just me, but making all user experience about giant pictures popping up is not really that attractive.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by mccalli ( 323026 )
      Due to APFS? What's desirable about keeping HFS+ as compared to APFS?
      • by Anonymous Coward

        It works?

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Nothing, but whiners like to state a reason for bitching when needed. ;)

      • Due to APFS? What's desirable about keeping HFS+ as compared to APFS?

        For fixed drives I can't think of any reason but for portable drives it can be handy for old Xboxes, as they can read HFS+ formatted external drives*, but not NTFS ones. Why this should be so for an MS product is simultaneously baffling and hilarious.

        * The 360 did at any rate.

  • Wasn't that the name of the fake Windows 8 version that they were trying to fool people into liking on those obnoxious commercials a few years back? Why would anyone want to bring back those memories?
    • I'm still waiting for Longhorn; it's supposed to kick ass.
    • Windows Vista.

  • Safari/Webkit currently has the worst SVG implementation of all evergreen browsers.

    SVG Masking works completely different in WebKit (due to a wrong implementation of the spec), so graphics using masks may look totally different on Safari. Performance is not really great, and there is the limitation to sRGB only in filters (missing part of the SVG 1.1 spec) and numerous other bugs,

    It would be wonderful if Apple started working on closing the gap to the other browsers, so we could finally have cross brows
    • It would be wonderful if Apple started working on closing the gap to the other browsers, so we could finally have cross browser for SVG 1.1.

      See my other post above - if Apple isn't interested in implementing POSIX they aren't going to even get out of bed for browser standards. Good luck.

  • What I want to know is whether my wifes mid-2010 iMac 27" will still be supported. I know, I know, many people will say "that machine is 8 years old, just replace it already". Frankly, I disagree: a Core i7 870 with 32GB is no slouch. It should be fine for years to come.
    • "that machine is 8 years old, just replace it already"

      And there's the biggest problem with Macs: you can't upgrade, let alone replace any part which fails.

      Until Apple changes this one aspect, they will be relegated to a tiny fraction of the PC market, just like Linux.
      • This machine came with 4GB RAM. You can also install an SSD if you are a good with a screwdriver. I presume it is possible to upgrade the CPU as this was a built-to-order with an i7. The default is an i5. The machine works fine: no part is broken. We're talking software obsoleting it.

        You surely have a point, but not in this context.

      • Sorry, I understand your point now. If I could upgrade the graphics card to something supporting "Metal", then I could continue to use it. Yes, in that sense you are absolutely right.
    • It should work fine, though they recommend a GPU capable of supporting Metal. That should include Intel graphics from Ivy Bridge onward, Nvidia Kepler and newer, and GCN Radeons (the HD 7700 series on up). Let's hope Metal support isn't a hard requirement...
      • Let's hope. The first Gen i7s didn't have integrated graphics. It comes with a Radeon card, but I need to look up which one. Radeon 5750 [everymac.com]. So if it's a hard requirement, this iMac will be obsoleted. Perfectly fine hardware.... *sigh*
        • There are plenty of other OSes that will run fine on that system.

          • Indeed. It will most certainly be very ironic if I can keep it functional by running Windows 10 on it. (Granted, I probably will use Linux, but personally I think the Linux desktop environments are all going down the drain. I say that as Linux user for over a decade, if not two decades)
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)



              MacBook (Early 2015 or newer)
              MacBook Air (Mid 2012 or newer)
              MacBook Pro (Mid 2012 or newer)
              Mac mini (Late 2012 or newer)
              iMac (Late 2012 or newer)
              iMac Pro (2017)
              Mac Pro (Late 2013, plus mid 2010 and mid 2012 models with recommended Metalcapable GPU)

    • What I want to know is whether my wifes mid-2010 iMac 27" will still be supported. I know, I know, many people will say "that machine is 8 years old, just replace it already". Frankly, I disagree: a Core i7 870 with 32GB is no slouch. It should be fine for years to come.

      It unfortunately looks like High Sierra is the end of the line for your wife's iMac. That means, if you haven't upgraded to HS already, now' the time!

      Of course, that doesn't mean that your iMac instantly becomes obsolete. Far from it. It just means that you probably have another 5-7 years before it truly becomes unsupported.

      And it isn't the CPU, it's the GPU. Mojave is drawing a line in the sand when it comes to "Metal" support. If the GPU doesn't support Metal, then it isn't Mojave-Compatible. Period.

      • It looks like it indeed. That's one of the things I can't replace in that machine: the graphics card.

        I usually upgrade the newer Mac OS approximately 6 months after initial release. So, yes, we are on High Sierra by now.

        I think your estimate of 5-7 years is a bit high, assuming we want to continue to run OS X (which is what we want, my wife really is as non-technical as they get and this is the best trade-off I found) I didn't know Apple did a N-2 version support (security updates), but apparently it doe

        • It looks like it indeed. That's one of the things I can't replace in that machine: the graphics card.

          I usually upgrade the newer Mac OS approximately 6 months after initial release. So, yes, we are on High Sierra by now.

          I think your estimate of 5-7 years is a bit high, assuming we want to continue to run OS X (which is what we want, my wife really is as non-technical as they get and this is the best trade-off I found) I didn't know Apple did a N-2 version support (security updates), but apparently it does. According to Wikipedia [wikipedia.org], a new Mac OS X comes out every year (announcement in June, release in September). This means, that we get 2 years more at most out of it while keeping security updates, which I consider the minimum requirement for a daily driver machine. That means, we will have been able to use it as a daily driver for about 10 years. That is okay. It could be better given the fact that todays machines are so overpowered for normal users, but 10 years is okay.

          We'll just see what top of the line iMac is current at that point then, and evaluate whether we want one again. It will depend on my wife.

          I wouldn't worry too much about getting Security Updates. Macs are generally quite secure anyway. There still hasn't been an exploit in the wild for macOS that didn't require user permission to install (a/k/a a Trojan).

    • "that machine is 8 years old, just replace it already"

      And yet it still has a superior keyboard and a superior lack of a touch bar.

  • When the key feature of new new release is "Dark theme" UI theming, you know that Apple is done innovating with OSX.

  • On Linux the redshift utility has been doing this for years.

Never worry about theory as long as the machinery does what it's supposed to do. -- R. A. Heinlein

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