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IOS Privacy Apple

Apple Launches iOS 11.3 With Raft of Privacy Features (theguardian.com) 116

Apple is launching a major privacy push, with software updates across all its devices to introduce new data privacy information immediately, with an updated website offering new privacy management tools to follow in May. From a report: Thursday's updates (macOS 10.13.4, iOS11.3 and tvOS 11.3) are prompted by the enormous new European data protection regulation GDPR, and have been in the works since at least January. But they come at a good time for the company, whose head Tim Cook has been merrily capitalising on the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica scandal, publicly rebuking Mark Zuckerberg over the social network's business model. For users of the company's devices, the biggest change will be the introduction of a unified data privacy iconography, which now shows up alongside detailed information about how Apple uses personal data for its various first-party services. "Apple believes privacy is a fundamental human right," the company will tell every user the first time they turn on their devices after the update, "so every Apple product is designed to minimise the collection and use of your data, use on-device processing whenever possible, and provide transparency and control over your information."
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Apple Launches iOS 11.3 With Raft of Privacy Features

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  • "Apple takes your money, not your data"

    (Then again vendor lockin with photo software.)

    • I'd pay money I can choose whether I want to pay over data I have little to no choice in providing. Just like I'd pay $30/year for a version of Facebook with no ads and where my data isn't being sold, if it were an option, and if I believed them if they provided it as an option.
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by ruir ( 2709173 )
        Feedly in Android and iOS, no fb ads.
        • by ruir ( 2709173 )
          Pardon, Friendly.
          • by zlives ( 2009072 )

            your data is still monetized, again, as the public has been made aware, its not just the ads (bad enough, but a choice) you have to watch out for.

            • Bingo. Friendly helps the user experience a little bit (i.e. persistent sorting by most recent, blocking ads and "people we think you know") but does nothing to block data collection.
    • by JoeyRox ( 2711699 ) on Thursday March 29, 2018 @02:31PM (#56348443)
      Apple also takes money from Google (billions per year to make Safari the default search engine) and likely Facebook (for deep IOS integration). So Apple doesn't take your data - they let others do it for them, and they receive a rich reward to let them do it.
      • And what kind of Data is the FB app taking from my iPhone?
        You seem to be an idiot.

        The App can not take any data without permission of the user, and those permissions are handled inside of the preferences of the device and not by the App.

        • It's the difference between shooting someone in the head yourself vs taking someone to a place where you know someone else will shoot them in the head, and then get paid for taking them there.
      • by TheFakeTimCook ( 4641057 ) on Thursday March 29, 2018 @03:29PM (#56348765)

        Apple also takes money from Google (billions per year to make Safari the default search engine) and likely Facebook (for deep IOS integration). So Apple doesn't take your data - they let others do it for them, and they receive a rich reward to let them do it.

        Apple kicked Facebook and Twitter Integration OUT of iOS 11.

        Do try to keep up.

        • Which likely means Facebook didn't want to pay Apple's price for allowing them to steal Apple's customers' privacy then. It seems Google is still happily paying that price, to the tune of billions of dollars a year.
          • I had no problems changing the search engine in Safari to DuckDuckGo. I doubt that Google pays Apple a thing if I do that
          • Which likely means Facebook didn't want to pay Apple's price for allowing them to steal Apple's customers' privacy then. It seems Google is still happily paying that price, to the tune of billions of dollars a year.

            Wrap another layer of tinfoil on that hat, buddy

            How dark and dank a world you must live in, where everything is a conspiracy, and all people and corporations have no other motivation other than to see how much money and information and advantage they can gain on you.

            • Wrap another layer of tinfoil on that hat, buddy

              How dark and dank a world you must live in, where everything is a conspiracy, and all people and corporations have no other motivation other than to see how much money and information and advantage they can gain on you.


              June 2, 2015: Apple's Tim Cook Delivers Blistering Speech On Encryption, Privacy - "Cook lost no time in directing comments at companies (obviously, though not explicitly) like Facebook and Google, which rely on advertising to users base
              • Wrap another layer of tinfoil on that hat, buddy

                How dark and dank a world you must live in, where everything is a conspiracy, and all people and corporations have no other motivation other than to see how much money and information and advantage they can gain on you.

                June 2, 2015: Apple's Tim Cook Delivers Blistering Speech On Encryption, Privacy - "Cook lost no time in directing comments at companies (obviously, though not explicitly) like Facebook and Google, which rely on advertising to users based on the data they collect from them for a portion, if not a majority, of their income."

                https://techcrunch.com/2015/06/02/apples-tim-cook-delivers-blistering-speech-on-encryption-privacy/ [techcrunch.com]

                January 22, 2016: Google Paid Apple $1 Billion To Keep Search Bar On Iphone - Secret Sum Surfaced in Transcript of Court Proceedings From Oracle Corp.'s Copyright Lawsuit Against Google

                http://adage.com/article/digital/google-paid-apple-1-billion-search-bar-iphone/302287/ [adage.com]

                Google Being the default search engine (which you can change) is a FAR CRY from Apple handing over data THEY collect to them.

                So, is that the best you can do? Change your search to use DuckDuckGo, and STFU, Hater. You can do that in iOS and macOS.

                • Google Being the default search engine (which you can change) is a FAR CRY from Apple handing over data THEY collect to them.
                  So, is that the best you can do? Change your search to use DuckDuckGo, and STFU, Hater. You can do that in iOS and macOS.

                  Mr. Cook complains about Google's evil, privacy-invading practices, while collecting billions of dollars to enable Google's evil, privacy-invading evil practices from Apple's own customers. That is the best I can do because hypocrisy has never been done better t
                  • Google Being the default search engine (which you can change) is a FAR CRY from Apple handing over data THEY collect to them.
                    So, is that the best you can do? Change your search to use DuckDuckGo, and STFU, Hater. You can do that in iOS and macOS.

                    Mr. Cook complains about Google's evil, privacy-invading practices, while collecting billions of dollars to enable Google's evil, privacy-invading evil practices from Apple's own customers. That is the best I can do because hypocrisy has never been done better than that.

                    So, do YOU want to answer all the Tech Support calls complaining about having DuckDuckGo being the default Search?

                    Didn't think so.

                    This is likely the same reason they switched back from Bing to Google a couple of years back. Sometimes giving the users what they DO want outweighs giving them what they SHOULD want.

                    Of course you'll have some snide remark; but we both know I'm right.

    • "Apple takes your money, not your data"

      (Then again vendor lockin with photo software.)

      WTF is your snarky parenthetical comment supposed to mean?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Yes. And since money is fungible and data isn't, it's a huge win. Said another way, the price difference between Apple and Android is how much you've sold your data for.

  • They have VERY few holes in them!
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday March 29, 2018 @02:15PM (#56348295)

    You pay a little more for their devices, but that's because the cost isn't subsidized by whoring your privacy out to the highest bidder.

    By the time most people are aware of the tradeoff, it's too late.

    • Yeah, that's why Apple holds decryption keys for everything on iCloud and gives the user no way to control it with E2E.

      The Secure Enclave stuff seems pretty good but they also run a giant honeypot and encourage its use.

  • by anthony_greer ( 2623521 ) on Thursday March 29, 2018 @02:15PM (#56348299)

    its all academic. it can be as secure as you want it to be but if Apple will willingly turn over the keys to the kingdom to the Chinese, i cant trust them to not do the same for the US, EU or anyone else?

    • by MouseR ( 3264 )

      I'm more worried about iCloud data centres in China. No longer storing keychains on iCloud.

    • by EvilSS ( 557649 )
      Can you trust a company to NOT comply with the laws of the countries they operate in? Probably not, no.
    • by SuperKendall ( 25149 ) on Thursday March 29, 2018 @03:33PM (#56348785)

      Apple will willingly turn over the keys to the kingdom to the Chinese

      Who says it's willing? It's very unwilling, but it's mandatory.

      Apple has isolated China iCloud servers since China mandates full access. It's not like any citizen outside the U.S. will see any data held there.

      i cant trust them to not do the same for the US, EU or anyone else?

      I can because they (A) don't want to (B) don't have to (no laws in the U.S. and EU mandating access)

    • I believe that's only for devices where you specific China as place of residence, then all data gets stored in a data center located there. But EvilSS pointed out, Apple didn't have a choice other than to not do business there. The problem isn't Apple, it's the Chinese Government; not that the US wouldn't try to do the same, or isn't at least trying now to pass some sort of legislation in the future. Between the Clipper Chip and PRISM, not surprised in the slightest.

  • As much as I loathe Apple fanboy-ship, I have to admit that if there are a handful of companies that I trust relatively more about my privacy and data, it's Apple. They actually go out of their way to separate what lives on your phone versus is uploaded to cloud (and they don't want to be in the business of uploading certain data).

    Makes me think that they at least have a team on it, versus like a goddamn Verizon-built phone, or HTC, Huawei, or even a Google Pixel or Samsung (and their wild-west-it's-al
    • Too late, recall PRISM. Information was leaked by CitizenFour showing that Apple, amongst others was on the dole from the Feds selling access to its user base. Seifert D. (2013, June 6). Secret program gives NSA, FBI backdoor access to Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft data. [theverge.com]
      • Too late, recall PRISM.
        Information was leaked by CitizenFour showing that Apple, amongst others was on the dole from the Feds selling access to its user base.

        Seifert D. (2013, June 6). Secret program gives NSA, FBI backdoor access to Apple, Google, Facebook, Microsoft data. [theverge.com]

        That was likely a fake/forgery. Notice on the 4th "Powerpoint Slide", Apple is by itself WAY off to the side, and doesn't just show a date, like the rest of the entries. It looks to me like someone was desperately trying to "convince" the reader that this was "True".

        • That was likely a fake/forgery. Notice on the 4th "Powerpoint Slide", Apple is by itself WAY off to the side, and doesn't just show a date, like the rest of the entries. It looks to me like someone was desperately trying to "convince" the reader that this was "True".

          No sorry, it wasn't. If you look at any of the documentation that was leaked, they used to have a copy on Cryptome you would have seen that Apple was on the list of corporations who took money for access. If it is any consolation M$ sold out before Apple.

          Also here:

          "PRISM/US-984XN Overview [gov1.info]

          • That was likely a fake/forgery. Notice on the 4th "Powerpoint Slide", Apple is by itself WAY off to the side, and doesn't just show a date, like the rest of the entries. It looks to me like someone was desperately trying to "convince" the reader that this was "True".

            No sorry, it wasn't.
            If you look at any of the documentation that was leaked, they used to have a copy on Cryptome you would have seen that Apple was on the list of corporations who took money for access. If it is any consolation M$ sold out before Apple.

            Also here:

            "PRISM/US-984XN Overview [gov1.info]

            I didn't mean that particular site's "proof" was forged. I submit the "original" PowerPoint "document" that ALL these "sources" cite is the SAME FORGERY.

            Show me some actual, official documents (not some fakey PowerPoint thing), and I might consider believing you.

            Until then, it didn't happen.

    • As much as I loathe Apple fanboy-ship, I have to admit that if there are a handful of companies that I trust relatively more about my privacy and data, it's Apple. They actually go out of their way to separate what lives on your phone versus is uploaded to cloud (and they don't want to be in the business of uploading certain data).

      Makes me think that they at least have a team on it, versus like a goddamn Verizon-built phone, or HTC, Huawei, or even a Google Pixel or Samsung (and their wild-west-it's-all-good use of Android).

      Exactly!

      At least SOMEONE has a brain around here...

  • GDPR FTW, I think? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by adosch ( 1397357 ) on Thursday March 29, 2018 @02:22PM (#56348363)

    I gotta give it to the EU parliament for GDPR, I mean, it may not be the cage shaking of epic proportion, but it's something. That shit was never going to happen in the United States, ever.

    This still changes little to none --- ok, it makes us now aware of shit we always knew anyway, but decided to turn a consumer blind eye too because was saw something fucking 'shiny'. I hold myself accountable and gullible just as anyone else. It is not like eating that last Krispy Kreme doughnut in the break room when you know you didn't ever fucking need it? And doing it over and over again with each new social media platform you just had to be a part of, knowing full well that 'free' means a loosening the belt every time you sit back down at your desk until you gotta go buy new Dockers at Macy's?

    I see this as little more than altered perception comfort-food icon eye candy for all of us to say, "See look, this isn't as intrusive as this one!". It's just another dangly, shiny piece to distract you. It's just implied compliance to exactly to what was said, nothing more, nothing less, to make you feel better. There's still zero disclosure and whatever was given up, there's already a new, unknown backdoor way of just doing it under our noses again.

  • Apple believes privacy is a fundamental human right

    If they believe it they should have no problem updating their legally binding privacy policy to state that fact.

    Actions not words Mr Cook, actions, not words. ... err or at least legally binding words rather than marketing soundbites.

    • If they believe it they should have no problem updating their legally binding privacy policy to state that fact.

      They did, since the thing you click on to agree to the privacy policy after an update (that states privacy is a fundamental human right), is the legally binding thing.

      If you were referring to the website [apple.com], well it doesn't have those exact words (yet), but it's obviously not the legally binding thing since it just sits there and I can ignore it.

      You seem pretty confused about how contracts and legali

      • You don't seem very clear on the concept of "Action" either

        Neither is Apple given that they are saying two different things as you pointed out.

    • Apple believes privacy is a fundamental human right

      If they believe it they should have no problem updating their legally binding privacy policy to state that fact.

      Actions not words Mr Cook, actions, not words. ... err or at least legally binding words rather than marketing soundbites.

      Why?

      Then you'll just shift to the "Well, that COULD change." strawman.

      • Why?

        Because marketing and legal binding agreements are two different things.

        Then you'll just shift

        Nope. Firstly it's much harder to shift a legal agreement without informing all users expressly of it. Secondly I don't shift goalposts or build strawmen. I just call it like I see it. So far we have nothing but "marketing" something which Apple is very good at. but no substance, something which Apple as of late also seems sadly good at.

        • Why?

          Because marketing and legal binding agreements are two different things.

          Then you'll just shift

          Nope. Firstly it's much harder to shift a legal agreement without informing all users expressly of it. Secondly I don't shift goalposts or build strawmen. I just call it like I see it. So far we have nothing but "marketing" something which Apple is very good at. but no substance, something which Apple as of late also seems sadly good at.

          So, after yesterday's revelations about Apple, regarding their "in your face" Privacy Policies when first-running a version of any of their OSes, and the ability to download and DELETE any/all retained personal info (admittedly spurred-on by EU Edicts), don't you think those count as "Actions", legalese or not?

  • You better implement all of this for older versions of iOS and macOS too, otherwise you're going to be sued because some people are still using OS X 10.9.5 and iOS 9.

  • when Silicon Valley eats its own.

    Tim Cook has been... publicly rebuking Mark Zuckerberg over the social network's business model.

    Much as I hate the Zuck, it would be entertaining to see him to take Cook to task over Foxconn's shitty treatment of its suicidal employees. In SV, pretty much nobody's hands are clean. Glass houses, something something, stones.

  • Are they still logging encryption keys in plain text?

    Gotta admit, I'm having a lot of trouble getting over that one, that was a doozie.
  • What about Apple? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by rtkluttz ( 244325 ) on Thursday March 29, 2018 @04:44PM (#56349241) Homepage

    If I had one your phones apple, how would protect ** MY ** phone from you? Why should I even trust you to make my security decisions and app choices for me? If you believe in the ideal that you speak of, then you would provide tools so that the OWNER of the device is the one in complete control. Why do your users have to use an encryption system that you are in control of and could potentially be forced to hand over the security keys to in the first place? Why can they not use any app THEY choose and any encryption system THEY choose?

    • Yes, that would make it a lot saver for the average iPhone user..... Come on, that would have a dramatic impact on security, most people don't even think about security or care until they get hit.
    • I don't think you have that quite right.

      If you run your own encryption, the key has to be available in memory, so it likely can be fished out of there somewhere. iPhones from the 5S onward have the Secure Enclave, which means the key isn't accessible by normal means. The security has continued to improve. Currently, the Secure Enclave generates its own key, which means Apple doesn't know what it is and can't get at it. See Apple's security guide [apple.com] for details.

      Therefore, Apple is providing encryption

  • Wasn't sure if that is a good thing or not.

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