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IOS Bug Apple IT

Apple Updates All of Its Operating Systems To Fix App-crashing Bug (engadget.com) 70

It took a few days, but Apple already has a fix out for a bug that caused crashes on each of its platforms. From a report: The company pushed new versions of iOS, macOS and watchOS to fix the issue, which was caused when someone pasted in or received a single Indian-language character in select communications apps -- most notably in iMessages, Safari and the app store. Using a specific character in the Telugu language native to India was enough to crash a variety of chat apps, including iMessage, WhatsApp, Twitter, Facebook Messenger, Gmail and Outlook, though Telegram and Skype were seemingly immune.
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Apple Updates All of Its Operating Systems To Fix App-crashing Bug

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  • Thanks Apple (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    I applaud your swift response patching this issue. Downloading the update now, since I don't have an Android and actually get updates for my 3+ year old phone.

  • by cristiroma ( 606375 ) on Tuesday February 20, 2018 @04:30AM (#56156106)
    It used to be just Little-Endian and Big-Endian, now it's also Single-Indian. Thanks Apple!
    • Designated crashing streets!

      • Designated crashing streets!

        Actually, this should be a very sobering incident for all of us. We pride ourselves in thinking that we can create robust uncrashable programs . . . and then . . . one wacky Indian character . . . oops!

        It's a good thing that the application that crashed wasn't driving an autonomous car!

        This should be a wake-up call for Google, Über, Tesla and the rest of the autonomous car folks . . . their software is probably going to be massively complex. And impossible to thoroughly test. They had better assum

    • Even back in the day of the mini- and first micro-computers there already were "Three Little Endians".

      The third was DEC Endian, on the PDP-11 (at least initially - I don't recall if it propagated to other things like the VAX).

      Due to the 16-bit word size and a byetwise addressing mode that treated the lower byte as zero LSB address (for byte-wise iteration of bignum arithmetic), peripheral I/O operations loaded the record with the even and odd bytes swapped. (ABCDEFGH -> BADCFEHG)

  • Form Over Function? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by ytene ( 4376651 ) on Tuesday February 20, 2018 @04:59AM (#56156146)
    My first Apple purchase was a Mac Mini with an Intel Core Duo CPU, 160Gb laptop HDD and (I think) 4Gb RAM. Since then I've purchased various other Apple devices (including iPods, iPads and an iPhone 7). According to my records, "Apple spend" has made up about 31% of my total hardware budget since the Mini.

    One thing I've noticed change at Apple over that period of time is that, since the passing of Steve Jobs, there has been a slow but steady decline in quality and reliability from Apple products. That's not to say that they were immune before he left us, just that there appears, subjectively, to be deterioration in QA over at Apple.

    I write this not as an Apple Fanboi nor an Apple Basher: my current iPad (Pro, 10") is probably the most-used piece of technology I've ever owned, but on the other hand last weekend saw me swearing in disbelief at my Mac Mini : having gone to it to update my iPhone and iPad software, I discovered that, somehow, iTunes had decided to unilaterally "lose" the artwork for about 20-25% of my music collection. Of 900 albums. I've already spent a good 90 minutes trying to repair that damage and have a *long* way to go yet...

    My experience to date has been that when I made my first Apple purchase, the company had a reputation for high prices but excellent quality. Today, the high prices remain but the quality appears to be disappearing rapidly. Issues with iTunes Artwork, iCloud replication, corruption of the iOS Address Book, a Mac Mini update that bricked the machine, iTunes that can't cope with it's media database on a network-connected drive; the list goes on - and that's just since Christmas 2017...

    Apple really needs to get back to basics. If it can't sell reliable product, then no matter how shiny it is, people won't buy.
    • by Freischutz ( 4776131 ) on Tuesday February 20, 2018 @05:07AM (#56156162)

      One thing I've noticed change at Apple over that period of time is that, since the passing of Steve Jobs, there has been a slow but steady decline in quality and reliability from Apple products. That's not to say that they were immune before he left us, just that there appears, subjectively, to be deterioration in QA over at Apple.

      That's what the next OS release is supposed to be about, stability rather than new features. That said, you are not the only one who'd prefer them to decrease the interval between 'stability releases'. As for iTunes, it sucks, it has always sucked and god knows if they'll ever fix it but it does not suck even half as much as iBooks. You spend a large amount of time organising the PDFs you added, every other update seems to mess them up and there is no easy way to export the library.

      • by Gr8Apes ( 679165 )
        This is why I organize my media personally, and let apps use that media without altering it.
    • Add to the list the slow rendering of PDFs in Preview.app in the last Mac OS. It is truly puzzling: Preview.app worked just fine for the last ten years, there was nothing to change, it was a great program. Yet somehow they made it render PDFs slower so it is now unusable for displaying presentations. I have to find something else for my teaching. It's like Apple wants to lose me as a customer.

  • What about the 9681 other less publicized yet very annoying iOS bugs?
  • Thanks, but (Score:2, Insightful)

    What about the 9753 other less publicized yet very annoying iOS bugs?
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Holy shit, they introduced another 72 bugs in the time it took you to double-post the same comment?

  • Sounds like it's time for Apple to start using the Big List of Naughty Strings (https://github.com/minimaxir/big-list-of-naughty-strings).

    It's pretty new, what with it's first commit only being in 2015 (although the idea of it's been around a lot longer).

  • Cut & Paste, All your base are belong to us.

  • There was no patch released for El Capitan, nor one for Sierra to the best of my knowledge. Both are still maintained by Apple.

    I expect those patches will come later, as did the Meltdown and Spectre fixes.

    It’s too bad Apple is such a small shop... they should consider hiring a couple extra folks so they can keep on top of all their supported products. I certainly wouldn’t want something trivial, like development a security patch, to adversely impact the release schedule of the Animoji team.

  • Do you use it by default?
  • by pubwvj ( 1045960 ) on Tuesday February 20, 2018 @02:51PM (#56158538)

    This is not good enough. Apple needs to issue updates for all the older affected OSs too. Not all hardware can run the new OSs. Not everyone wants the new OSs. Not all legacy software works with the old OSs. The result is there are a lot of older devices out there that need continued legacy support. The cost of fixing the older OSs is trivial. Apple should do it.

  • Like Sierra v10.12.6 and El Capitan v10.11.6?

(null cookie; hope that's ok)

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