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Desktops (Apple) IOS Programming Software Apple

Apple Still Aims To Allow iPad Apps To Run on Macs This Year (axios.com) 63

Apple's push for performance and security improvements over new features will also apply to this year's Mac software, Axios reported on Wednesday, but one key feature remains on the roadmap for 2018: The ability for Macs to run iPad apps. From the report: On the Mac side, this is taking the form of a new project around security as well as improvements in performance when waking and unlocking the system. While users would certainly welcome changes that make their systems run better and more securely, customers tend to be more motivated to make purchases based on new features rather than promised improvements around security or performance, which can be tough to judge. The signature new feature for the Mac -- the ability to run iPad apps -- is a significant undertaking that adds a high degree of complexity to this year's OS release.
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Apple Still Aims To Allow iPad Apps To Run on Macs This Year

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  • by Kenja ( 541830 ) on Wednesday January 31, 2018 @12:29PM (#56041149)
    There's an iOS device emulator included with XCode.
    • There's an iOS device emulator included with XCode.

      I'm curious though how well they will translate though? Last time I used the emulator (haven't done iOS development in a while), and while you could do quite a bit of testing, there was a lot you can't do. How do you handle some unique inputs such as screen tilt or multi-touch gestures? I imagine that they'd want them to run full screen too, which you can't do with the emulator either last time I checked.

      • The touchpad on the MacBook line is multi-touch capable, as is the BlueTooth touchpad that comes with the iMac line. I'm not sure if the MacPro line comes with the BlueTooth touchpad.
  • by jtara ( 133429 ) on Wednesday January 31, 2018 @12:45PM (#56041287)

    I would bet it will not be an ARM emulator.

    Apple already has iOS ported to X86 and has forever. It's used by developers when testing on the iOS simulator running on MacOS. The simulator doesn't run ARM code. It runs X86 code.

    Apple would likely give developers the option of including X86 platform support in their build. Developers could OPT IN to releasing on macOS. You already build for two different ARM platforms.

    There is nothing revolutionary here. Just a new build option and some new App Store/ITunesConnect functionality.

    I'm a cross-platform developer. I write apps that run on iOS and Android. On Android, it uses the NDK (native development kit) and I build for both ARM and X86. (Because some Android tablets are X86). What Apple is proposing is likely not much different.

    Apple wouldn't likely provide an ARM emulator, because the performance would suck.

    Every time Apple comes out with a new XCode version, they say "jump", and developers respond with "how high?". Or... not agaaaaainnnnn!

    • Question if you know... I had built some apps that used libs in the AndroWish app. I would install both the AndroWish app (which had the ndk libs in it) and my app which was stripped down TclTk + a little secret sauce to load the AndroWish stuff. This worked on my old Android Version 4 nexus 4 phone. I got a new phone which runs Oreo and while the AndroWish app worked, the apps which used AndroWish libs did not. In the end I rebuilt the AndroWish app myself, and bolted on the Tcl/Tk from my apps so that it

  • This is great but Apple should be offering legacy software support everywhere so that all iOS apps run on both iOS devices and Macs and all Mac applications run on both iOS devices and Macs. This is a fairly trivial task that would open up a huge amount of software that they have caused to be abandoned. There is a tremendous amount of excellent kids educational software that doesn't run on modern MacOSs (and iOS) that would then be available. There is also a lot of business applications and just fun other s

    • This is great but Apple should be offering legacy software support everywhere so that all iOS apps run on both iOS devices and Macs and all Mac applications run on both iOS devices and Macs. This is a fairly trivial task that would open up a huge amount of software that they have caused to be abandoned. There is a tremendous amount of excellent kids educational software that doesn't run on modern MacOSs (and iOS) that would then be available. There is also a lot of business applications and just fun other stuff. They can sandbox it all to make it safe. Apple has the resources.

      It is a lot easier to emulate a system with less speed and resources on a system with greater speed and resources than vice-versa.

      That's why we won't be having macOS on iOS for a while yet...

      • by pubwvj ( 1045960 )

        Yes, I understand, and most software does not tax the processors on either modern (>2005) Macs or iOS devices. Admittedly some very heavy duty power using software will have trouble under emulation but that isn't the software in question.

  • Apps I can"t ever roll back, have zero control over and where any update may break/change the app fundamentally and there is nothing you can do about it? Yea, no thanks. I don't care if it is the future I like my MacBook as is.

    • You can restore the App from a backup, just like you do right now.

    • Apps I can"t ever roll back, have zero control over and where any update may break/change the app fundamentally and there is nothing you can do about it? Yea, no thanks. I don't care if it is the future I like my MacBook as is.

      WTF are you bleating about?

  • Hey, maybe they can let me run 32bit apps as well. So I can finally switch from iOS10 to 11...
  • I develop Apps and I welcome more platform support. Since the Xcode emulator already does this I can play with my own apps on my Mac desktop.
    However there are some things that are lacking and the big one is the finger gestures.
    You need to emulate finger swipes, pinch, shake etc etc with mouse or track pad.
    That doesn't sound like Apple at all, they don't like hacks and compromises. They've also stated they don't like touch screens on Macs.
    So, yes, very easy to do with existing Apps since Xcode can already co

  • by Andreas Mayer ( 1486091 ) on Wednesday January 31, 2018 @06:26PM (#56043941) Homepage

    What Apple might bring, is the ability to create an application that runs on either device. But that application will have to be developed to explicitly support both, macOS and iOS devices. It will have to be able to handle a UI with either mouse or touch.

    In essence, there will be one entry in the App Store and if you download the app you'll get the variant suitable for your device.

    A Mac will not be able to just run any old iPad app.

    Source ... well, just ask anyone with a clue about macOS/iOS development.

  • From day one of the iOS SDK, we've had the iPhone simulator, and later the iPad and Apple Watch simulators.

    I've said for years that Apple should make it a consumer feature, and let us run any of our iOS apps on the Mac. Glad to hear they're getting around to it.

    -jcr

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