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IOS Cellphones Iphone Software Technology

iOS 11 Passes 50 Percent Adoption In Under 2 Months (venturebeat.com) 133

An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: After a longer wait than usual, Apple today finally released the first official numbers for iOS 11. The various figures and estimates released by marketing and research firms are no longer relevant, as we now know for certain that iOS 11 has passed the 50 percent mark in less than two months. In other words, the latest version of the company's mobile operating system is now on one in every two of its mobile devices. iOS 11 was released on September 13, meaning it took less than seven weeks to reach the majority of users that Apple tracks. While this is certainly impressive, keep in mind that iOS 10 took less than a month and iOS 9 took less than a week to hit the same adoption milestone. Sure, the number of iOS devices is growing, but Apple also cuts down the number allowed to get the latest updates.

iOS 11 Passes 50 Percent Adoption In Under 2 Months

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  • iPhone users (in the US at least, not sure what's going on elsewhere) are conditioned to upgrade their devices. Even though carrier subsidies are gone, they've been replaced by a series of "lease/loan/trade-up" programs that keep people in contracts with their carriers until the equipment loan is satisfied. That, and iOS users tend to have more disposable income to go upgrade their shiny devices, so even if the cost of the device is hidden they don't really care.

    Software-wise, it's the same thing driving t

    • by BorgDrone ( 64343 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @08:23AM (#55512705) Homepage

      iPhone users (...) are conditioned to upgrade their devices.

      You know that on iOS, unlike Android, you can update to the latest OS version without buying a new phone, right ?

      The adoption numbers are a result of updates actually being available to consumers, not lack of willingness to update on the part of Android users.

      • by XxtraLarGe ( 551297 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @08:56AM (#55512867) Journal

        You know that on iOS, unlike Android, you can update to the latest OS version without buying a new phone, right ?

        My wife has iOS 11 on her iPhone 5s. I have an iPhone 7 Plus that I just upgraded to after the 8 & X were announced, and I still haven't updated to 11. Her battery drains pretty quickly.

        • by Gr8Apes ( 679165 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @10:21AM (#55513343)

          The battery drain is definitely there - it's between 2 and 4 times as bad as with iOS 10. This would be after disabling all background processing, and removing cellular data from most apps. My suspicion is the mail app is still processing in the background, based on the fact that the battery drain shows mail in the top 2 at 10% drain in "background"... and mail is supposed to not run in background at all, and does have access to cellular. I've noticed that in weak cell service areas, the battery drains like you're mining bitcoin, so it's likely that mail is the primary culprit in my case, I'm considering testing by removing cellular data from mail just for a short while.

          I installed iOS 11 to test a few things, on my personal phone, in a moment of forgetfulness. I normally don't install an update until the x.1 version comes out, because that's usually the beta, IMNSHO. Everything before that is not ready based on personal experience and testing since the iOS 9 release. Before that iOS was reasonably solid. If I could, I'd actually run on iOS 8, it was rock solid and didn't have any of the irritating bugs that really bother me with 10 and 11.

        • Was her battery life already draining quickly?
          Older device at the end of iOS chain is also near the end of the expected battery life. Granted if these devices had user teplacable batteries you should be able to use these “premium” phones for over a decade. But like most OS updates the newer OS uses more cpu cycles expecting a faster device so does use more battery. Combine that with an older device with a battery that isn’t holding its charge as well compounds the problem.
          Yes iOS 11 had

          • by tsa ( 15680 )

            That is complete bullshit. My iPad 3 is now 5 years old and still perfectly fine, although it's been stuck on iOS 9 for over two years now.

          • Was her battery life already draining quickly? Older device at the end of iOS chain is also near the end of the expected battery life. Granted if these devices had user teplacable batteries you should be able to use these âoepremiumâ phones for over a decade. But like most OS updates the newer OS uses more cpu cycles expecting a faster device so does use more battery. Combine that with an older device with a battery that isnâ(TM)t holding its charge as well compounds the problem.

            I bought it for her new back in May 2017, so that should not be the case. Walmart was selling them for $99 with Total Wireless service.

        • I have a 6s and won't update until the battery drain is fixed.

      • by SlaveToTheGrind ( 546262 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @11:06AM (#55513659)
        <quote>You know that on iOS, unlike Android, you can update to the latest OS version without buying a new phone, right ?</quote>

        Yes, that's technically true -- you don't have to buy a new phone until the update completes.
    • by OffTheLip ( 636691 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @08:39AM (#55512791)
      And what the hell is up with the native Podcast app. It is all but worthless now. I guess the Apple QA folks don't use it or have switched to an AppStore replacement.
      • by jittles ( 1613415 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @09:15AM (#55512963)

        And what the hell is up with the native Podcast app. It is all but worthless now. I guess the Apple QA folks don't use it or have switched to an AppStore replacement.

        My experience with iOS 11 suggests that Apple does not have any QA staff anymore. Certainly no QA staff that does something as silly as type the word "I" anywhere.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          It's a dumb and embarrassing mistake, no doubt. But to go from that to "Apple does not have any QA staff anymore" is silly.

          Apple annually rolls out significant software updates to hundreds of millions of users, generally with very few problems. Last year, they changed the filesystem in-place, with very few (any?) reported issues.

          This is unprecedented in software engineering. Android, Windows, Linux... none of them come close to matching Apple's upgrade process in terms of scope or end-user experience.

        • by antdude ( 79039 )

          Lots of companies are like this. MS got rid of its QA teams. Compnaies aren't really caring and paying QA testings. They expect developers, users, etc. to do those testings. :(

      • by Quirkz ( 1206400 )

        Glad someone else mentioned it. I'm having a hell of a time with Podcast. It took me about a month to get it halfway right in iOS 10, and about the time I did that 11 came out.

        My main problem is, when one podcast ends, the next one won't start without manual intervention, which is particularly bad because I'm mostly listening on the road.

        But really the whole interface is bad. Giant, screen-filling boxes, too much drilling down just to find an episode to play, difficult filters, a default that thinks you wan

        • The native podcast app has been bad since it was first introduced. Once you change podcast apps to a third party app, you won't usually be stuck with it forever. Most third party apps support importing and exporting your podcast subscriptions via the OPML file specification. I use Overcast. It syncs between devices better than Apple podcast every have. It's more customizable, it's written by an independent developer - Marco Arment (first employee at Tumblr, creator of Instapaper).

      • by tsa ( 15680 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @11:16AM (#55513733) Homepage

        Indeed that is pretty amazing. They tried to make something worse than iTunes and they SUCCEEDED! That is a great achievement.

    • by MikeMo ( 521697 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @09:44AM (#55513143)
      You, sir, are completely uninformed. The reason iOS users update more frequently is precisely because the update does not come through the carriers. It comes directly from Apple. In all cases, no exceptions. And, of course, the update is completely free and always has been.

      Even people with hand-me-downs and resales do updates.
      • by Gr8Apes ( 679165 )
        That is a difference between iphones and android. Android requires an active sim for verizon/AT&T/T-Mobile updates, at least. AFAIK, iPhones can be updated without a SIM, although you cannot setup a new phone without a sim, whereas with Android you can.
      • by Pieroxy ( 222434 )

        You, sir, are completely uninformed. The reason iOS users update more frequently is precisely because the update does not come through the carriers. It comes directly from Apple. In all cases, no exceptions. And, of course, the update is completely free and always has been.

        Even people with hand-me-downs and resales do updates.

        Actually, first versions of iOS (2 and 3) were not free for ipod touch users.

    • by mlw4428 ( 1029576 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @10:11AM (#55513303)
      Patently untrue. iOS 11 supports back to 5s. That's for a phone released in September of 2013. Meaning the Galaxy S5 which was released in April of 2014 will not be getting the upgrade (from Samsung). From a support model perspective, Apple wins hands down. It supports the devices longer with more frequent updates than even the best Android manufacturer.
      • Patently untrue. iOS 11 supports back to 5s. That's for a phone released in September of 2013. Meaning the Galaxy S5 which was released in April of 2014 will not be getting the upgrade (from Samsung). From a support model perspective, Apple wins hands down. It supports the devices longer with more frequent updates than even the best Android manufacturer.

        The cutoff in iOS 11 was dictated by which devices were 64 bit, as iOS 11 is 64-bit only.

        That's why the list of iOS 11 compatible devices starts at the 5s, the first 64-bit iPhone.

    • The iPhone 8, 8 plus and X currently make up about 4.79% of the iPhone market. The iPhone 7 that I got over the weekend still had iOS 10 on it. Since no new iPads have been released this fall, all of them will have iOS 10 on them at time of sale.

      http://info.localytics.com/blo... [localytics.com]

      I upgrade my OS because I want to upgrade my OS. The upgrade isn't forced, I have to give it permission to install.

  • by Opportunist ( 166417 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @08:13AM (#55512671)

    Windows 10 reached a market share of about 25% in over 2 years.

    Now this would be the moment when you'd have to ask why.

    • Similar idea with Edge vs Chrome. Chrome is preferred while Edge is 1) installed along with the system 2) is the default browser 3) when you try to change the default the OS says "Don't you want to try it [edge] first, instead?"
    • Yeah, why are Apple users overs with upgrades? No seriously comparing mobile systems to desktop OSes is pointless. I use the OS that comes with the device. There's nothing my windows 7 machine can't do that Windows 10 can in the day to day activities. I also don't upgrade it every 2 years.

      I'll upgrade when I need to, not because I have an obsession.

  • by mlw4428 ( 1029576 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @08:14AM (#55512677)
    The highest adoption rate is Marshmallow at 32% and Lollipop (with API 22) at 21%. That's the one big benefit of Apple: you get updates (for at least a handful number of years).
    • Apple has one major release stream. Android have several with security updates backported back to version 4.4.

      There is more of a requirement to run the latest shiny for iOS, whereas in Android the requirement is not there and the shiny is reserved for customers paying for updated devices.

      • Apple has one major release stream. Android have several with security updates backported back to version 4.4.

        Android in general does. Android phones have a different story. Some phones require rooting the phone for new updates which may be unsupported for the phone so things might break/fail/not work right. Some Android phones simply can't be updated.

        There is more of a requirement to run the latest shiny for iOS, whereas in Android the requirement is not there and the shiny is reserved for customers paying for updated devices.

        And security patches having nothing to do with updates? On average, Apple supports their phones longer than Android. This is somewhat perplexing if you're paying the same price for both phones.

        • And security patches having nothing to do with updates? On average, Apple supports their phones longer than Android.

          You're not understanding the difference between updates and security patches. They have nothing to do with each other. Just because your Ancient Galaxy S5 didn't get Orea, or Nougat, or maybe you didn't chose to install Marshmallow doesn't mean that it isn't supported due to the difference between security level patching and the version of the OS.

          With Apple, you're either running the latest or you're out of support. Apple support their hardware with core OS releases longer, but security wise there's little

          • You're not understanding the difference between updates and security patches. They have nothing to do with each other. Just because your Ancient Galaxy S5 didn't get Orea, or Nougat, or maybe you didn't chose to install Marshmallow doesn't mean that it isn't supported due to the difference between security level patching and the version of the OS.

            Oh I understand the difference. So please tell me that how I get security updates on my Android phone? You can't because you don't know 1) the model/version and 2) the carrier. With Android you might get a phone that hasn't been updated in years and can't be updated/won't be updated even with security patches. Like I said: Android in general does. With Android phones, the details matter.

            But I can just root the phone right? Maybe. Again depends on the model/version/firmware version/etc and carrier. Even the

            • So *whaa* {insert problem that isn't related to Google about Google's OS here}.
              Vote with your wallet. My phone is 3 years old and is on security patch level October 2017, without rooting, just from OTA updates, and running Lollipop.

              Which brings me back to the original point: There's fuck all reason to desire an upgrade to a new OS, unlike with Apple where doing so is critical for security reasons.

              • So *whaa* {insert problem that isn't related to Google about Google's OS here}.

                You wrote about Android OS in general. Are you denying that these are legitimate problems affecting Android phones in general. Most consumers don't give a damn that Google puts out Android security updates that they don't see. They care that they can get the updates.

                Vote with your wallet. My phone is 3 years old and is on security patch level October 2017, without rooting, just from OTA updates, and running Lollipop

                No that wasn't your point. Your point was: "There is more of a requirement to run the latest shiny for iOS, whereas in Android the requirement is not there and the shiny is reserved for customers paying for updated devices." With an Android dev

          • With Apple, you're either running the latest or you're out of support

            Not true, there have been plenty of times where Apple back ported security patches to the previous version of the OS for devices that couldn't run the latest version.

      • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

        Apple has one major release stream. Android have several with security updates backported back to version 4.4.

        There is more of a requirement to run the latest shiny for iOS, whereas in Android the requirement is not there and the shiny is reserved for customers paying for updated devices.

        That's because on iOS, more users will be on the latest shiny OS than on Android, where you have the majority of users still on 3-4 year old OSes because that's all they ever will get.

        And 4.4 security updates stopped as of

        • That's because on iOS, more users will be on the latest shiny OS than on Android

          Exactly my point.

          And 4.4 security updates stopped as of October. 5 updates will stop soon enough.

          Got a cite for that? I couldn't find anything on the topic that said that Google won't update the security patch level on 4.4 going forward.

          If you're an iOS developer, you can target iOS 11 for your apps because a good chunk of the population will be using it. If you're an Android developer, targeting Oreo will net you a minuscule part of the Android userbase. You'd want to target Android 6 or so to capture the majority of Android users.

          Targetting? What are you talking about. The API levels have changed so little in the past 3+ years. A vast majority of new features do not affect core functionality. The backwards compatibility of Android APIs is one of its best selling points to developers. You can target API level 26 and implement all the latest and greatest without having the core fu

  • DUH` (Score:5, Insightful)

    by p51d007 ( 656414 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @08:20AM (#55512697)
    When the manufacturer controls the updates, I'm surprised it's THAT low.
    • Controls much less than MS and windows 10. People choose to update whenever they feel to do so. This small red "1" tells you an update is pending, but you can just ignore it.
      • Controls much less than MS and windows 10. People choose to update whenever they feel to do so. This small red "1" tells you an update is pending, but you can just ignore it.

        You can ignore it but it is more then just a little red 1 over the updates icon in the settings. The first time each day I wake and unlock unlock my iPhone running 10.3 it pops up saying there is an update and wants me to schedule it. The options are to install the update now, schedule a time a little later to install it, or 'Remind me later' which apparently mean every single day.

        • When the manufacturer controls the updates, I'm surprised it's THAT low.

          Controls much less than MS and windows 10. People choose to update whenever they feel to do so. This small red "1" tells you an update is pending, but you can just ignore it.

          You can ignore it but it is more then just a little red 1 over the updates icon in the settings. The first time each day I wake and unlock unlock my iPhone running 10.3 it pops up saying there is an update and wants me to schedule it. The options are to install the update now, schedule a time a little later to install it, or 'Remind me later' which apparently mean every single day.

          What an amusing discussion, it's just one of those fights you can't win. Leave it up to the user when to update and he'll bitch and moan about you not patching some vulnerability which led to his phone being pwned by some Russian mafia hacker who'll cleaned out his life savings. Force the user to update so his phone won't be pwned by some Russian mafia hacker who'll clean out his life savings and the user will bitch and moan about how you are a tyrant who forces him into doing unnecessary updates all the ti

  • But it hasn't slowed down my gold old 5s.

    For now. I hope to get another year out of it before looking for options.

    No headphone jack, no upgrade.

    • by dysmal ( 3361085 )

      Not touching iOS 11 until they address the BlueTooth/WiFi settings where you toggle it OFF in control center and all it does is DISCONNECT you for the rest of the day.

      https://discussions.apple.com/... [apple.com]

      • I really like the new behavior, it's much better for travel where you just want it to not connect to something you had connected to before for the day, then when you get home it will still be on WiFi.

        Now I would agree it's a bit confusion, but I think they just need to clarify that's what it is doing rather than change what it does... after all you can still turn it off in Settings.

      • Not touching iOS 11 until they address the BlueTooth/WiFi settings where you toggle it OFF in control center and all it does is DISCONNECT you for the rest of the day.

        https://discussions.apple.com/... [apple.com]

        They DID address it.

        The toggle in Control Panel is a Disconnect; but peer-peer services such as AirDrop still work. This AVOIDS confusion on the part of users.

        All one has to do to actually turn WiFi OFF, is to toggle it OFF in the Settings App.

  • Following iOS 11/11.1 install, 3 years old iPhones have camera and GPS problems (iPhone 6/6+) ; not saying Apple intentionally crippled a 3 yo perfectly working hardware to force users to upgrade, but that's quite suspicious...
    • Following iOS 11/11.1 install, 3 years old iPhones have camera and GPS problems (iPhone 6/6+) ; not saying Apple intentionally crippled a 3 yo perfectly working hardware to force users to upgrade, but that's quite suspicious...

      I don't believe it's anything malicious. I believe that Apple software quality is rapidly approaching 0.

      • Oh yeah, Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence, forgot this one!
      • Here's the thing with Apple: I think they test everything as best as they can...but not in the real world.

        The keyboard problems on their Pro laptops? That sounds like a lot of testing was done in Jony Ive's clean workroom. Same with the weird design problems with the AppleTV remote. Same with the TouchBar. All these things work great if you're not bringing something to a cafe and trying to get work done there, or sitting on a real couch with dogs and kids and trying to use the AppleTV remote in the dark whi

        • Re:Not adopted (Score:4, Informative)

          by jittles ( 1613415 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @11:09AM (#55513683)

          I love my Apple stuff, but sometimes it really feels like nobody tried to use it out in the street before shipping it.

          Sometimes? Just about every single issue in the past few years could have easily been spotted by any QA or dev who just used their own tool. Even the calculator issue in iOS 11 shows that no one at Apple has bothered to use the calculator on their phone in the year or so that Apple has been working on the release.

          • There are some things they do and test really well! And on iOS they have the advantage of a lot of beta users. I really like my iPhone 7, for instance, and I'm surprised at how much of an upgrade it was from my 6.

            But yeah, I think there's a real issue with real world testing, and it's going to come back and haunt Apple. (If it isn't doing so already; the replacement costs for those keyboards are enormous, and for the time being, all of them are being done under warranty. There's also losing the mantle of se

    • Everything was a lot slower on my 6, yes. (I had to get a 7 over the weekend because my 6 was stolen.)

      However, since I'm usually running the public beta, I made a complaint about the keyboard speed and got an email about it today, with the claim that they've made a fix that MIGHT help. So performance is something they're actively working on, it sounds like.

      (I greatly suspect, like the weird issue with the 'I' key, that this was because of the 'machine learning' stuff they're trying to run in the background.

  • I can't update my perfectly working iPad because it is not supported by iOS11.

  • As every Apple user knows, you never update to the latest Mac OS or iOS release when it first comes out due to the sometimes insurmountable issues you might face (like lost data). However this one seems to be the worst, the primary issue being the inability for an iPhone or iPad to connect to a large number of wireless networks because Apple has decided what is a 'safe' network and what is not. This was feedbacked during beta testing in the summer and unfortunately the final release still incorporated this
  • I've been an i adopter forever, and I'm not really sure why. I'd say buy and large, Apple gives you very little room and window of opportunity to have older iOS versions + apps stay in a security and maintenence only release. I guarantee that the over half of that '50%' adoption was because of the classically conditioned sub-novice-power-savvy Apple user just auto-forcing updates or accidentally clicking the 'do it next time I'm on wifi at 3am' shit, then being undeniably pissed because all the phony tech

  • by tomxor ( 2379126 ) on Wednesday November 08, 2017 @08:52AM (#55512845)
    They can't search for "install iOS 10" to revert... because they can't type "i"
  • I almost hit upgrade on my phone, but the I saw the announcement of an input bug.

    o_O

    Input bug? How the Hell do you miss that in QA?

    • Supposedly it's a machine learning bug, which means if you're just testing how the keyboard works in sort of ideal conditions, it's not going to pop up. 50% adoption also means a LOT of people. Even a 1 in 500000 bug is going to crop up on a LOT of phones.

  • The removal of 32-bit support is what has stopped me from upgrading my iPad. I have a number of games on there that will never get a 64-bit version since the studios that ported them are long gone. I paid good money for those games.

    I guess that there might come a time when some application I really want is only available for iOS 11 and outweighs my desire to retain access to my 32-bit library, but until then I'm sticking with 10.

  • On one hand, updating my iPhone 6 to iOS11 added a feature I've been wanting for a LONG time. IMAP IDLE support! Happy to have that at last.

    On the other hand, now the phone is slow and unresponsive. Feels like an Android.

  • wishes I could go back to iOS 10

  • whichever way you look at it.

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