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Apple's Tim Cook Shares What He Learned From Steve Jobs (businessinsider.com) 169

Speaking at Oxford, Apple CEO Tim Cook shared a lesson learned from the "spectacular" commercial failure of the Power Mac G4 Cube in 2000 -- and from his mentor Steve Jobs. An anonymous reader quotes Business Insider: "It was a very important product for us, we put a lot of love into it, we put enormous engineering into it," Cook said of the G4 Cube on stage. He calls it an "engineering marvel." At the time, Cook was Apple Senior VP of Worldwide Operations, recruited personally by then-CEO Steve Jobs... While the design was a hit, it was $200 more expensive than the regular Power Mac G4, a more traditional-looking PC with very similar specs. And some Cubes would develop cosmetic cracks in the acrylic cube casing due to a manufacturing flaw. In his talk, Cook says that Apple knew the Cube was flopping "from the very first day, almost..."

Ultimately, Cook says, it was a lesson in humility and pride. Apple had told both employees and customers that the G4 Cube was the future. And yet, despite Apple's massive hype, demand just wasn't there, and the company had to walk away. "This was another thing that Steve [Jobs] taught me, actually," says Cook. "You've got to be willing to look yourself in the mirror and say I was wrong, it's not right." In a broader sense, Cook says that Jobs taught him the value of intellectual honesty -- that, no matter how much you care about something, you have to be willing to take new data and apply it to the situation.

He advised his audience to "be intellectually honest -- and have the courage to change."

And the article points out that today there's a small but enthusiastic community who are still hacking their Power Mac G4 Cubes.
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Apple's Tim Cook Shares What He Learned From Steve Jobs

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  • by fyngyrz ( 762201 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @03:21PM (#55373515) Homepage Journal

    He advised his audience to "be intellectually honest -- and have the courage to change."

    So... do we get a proper tower mac pro back now?

    • They confirmed earlier this year [techcrunch.com] their intent to reboot (pun not intended) the Mac Pro line by releasing a new design for the Mac Pro in 2018 that focuses on modularity. In the meantime, they did a minor spec bump and price drop, while also announcing an iMac Pro model due for release later this year [apple.com] that actually has decent specs for lots of pro work, though it’s obviously lacking in expandability.

      • They confirmed earlier this year their intent to reboot (pun not intended) the Mac Pro line by releasing a new design for the Mac Pro in 2018 that focuses on modularity.

        Yes, we will see what that actually means. Technically speaking, the trashcan is "modular", inasmuch as you can connect modules to it (all over your desk.) That was a terrible idea. It remains to be determined if they're willing to admit that and fix it, or if they're going to keep doing "courageous" things to their users without lube. Rece

  • by Anonymous Coward

    iPods and iTunes saved the Mac Book lines and iMacs yet Timmy killed the iPods save the Touch and will soon kill iTunes because of all the free stuff like internet radio in preference for his subscriptions model.

    Selective honesty is Mr. Timmy Cook's name.

    • Erm... you can keep on selling VHS and see if your company survives.

      Keeping a product that was was hugely important 15 years ago but is no longer profitable for nostalgia is not the best business plan.

      Fanboys (or ex) need to wake the fuck up about feeling betrayed by companies for culling products that are outdated.

    • by exomondo ( 1725132 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @05:50PM (#55374129)

      Apple is always going to say whatever their new thing is is the way of the future, they are pretty much obligated to say that. Whether that is the G4 Cube, the Trashcan Mac, Magsafe, Firewire, styluses (styli?), the port-variationless Macbooks or iPhone face unlock but ultimately it is up to the customers to make the distinction whether that is true or not. The rabid fanboys will defend whatever they do and whatever they say anyway but ultimately they are a for-profit corporation and the market decides when they backpeddle and when they don't.

      Some things have turned out to indeed be the way of the future, some haven't and some we don't yet know. It's obviously ridiculous to defend and parrot that XYZ is the way of the future just because Apple (or any company or person for that matter) says it is when they are trying to sell it to you.

    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      iPods and iTunes saved the Mac Book lines and iMacs yet Timmy killed the iPods save the Touch and will soon kill iTunes because of all the free stuff like internet radio in preference for his subscriptions model.

      Selective honesty is Mr. Timmy Cook's name.

      First, the iPods really have not been selling. iPod sales have been down for the past 10 years. The iPhone killed the iPod. That has been true since the iPhone was released, and Apple's sales reports bear that out.

      Second, the iPod wasn't killed. The iPod wa

    • Where did you read that they are killing off iTunes?

      Honestly, that POS has had a good run but it desperately needs to be taken out behind the barn and shot before it gets any worse.

      But what would they replace it with?

  • ooh I know (Score:5, Funny)

    by nomadic ( 141991 ) <nomadicworld AT gmail DOT com> on Sunday October 15, 2017 @03:33PM (#55373575) Homepage

    "I'll keep it short and sweet. Family, religion, friendship. These are the three demons you must slay if you wish to succeed in business. When opportunity knocks, you don't want to be driving to a maternity hospital or sitting in some phony-baloney church. Or synagogue."

  • good grief (Score:2, Insightful)

    by nomadic ( 141991 )

    Wait, now I actually read it.

    ""This was another thing that Steve [Jobs] taught me, actually," says Cook. "You've got to be willing to look yourself in the mirror and say I was wrong, it's not right.""

    Steve Jobs, the archetypical narcissist, taught him that? Did he teach him that by providing an example of what not to do?

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by TapeCutter ( 624760 )

      Did he teach him that by providing an example of what not to do?

      Came here to say the same thing. Job's shunned the medical profession in favour of new age mumbo-jumbo, he basically killed himself with his own arrogance and hubris.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The Cube and Can are my two favorite machines becasue they fit into my desktop, esthetically. Differentiation in the electronics, NSM.

    The processing power of each meant that the cube didn't last that long there, and the Can will eventually go. The cube CPU upgrade make it noisy (had a fan), and that constant annoyance was that about that. The Can is still sitting on my desk, and is perfect for what it is. But it's now 3yrs old, and simulations are taking hours to run again...

    Both are Geek toys. Nothing

  • by Trailer Trash ( 60756 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @03:41PM (#55373615) Homepage

    Here's exactly what Cook learned from Jobs: "not enough".

    I'm simply disgusted with the changes to the latest macbook pros. I'm using a mid-2015 right now and I would have upgraded already if there were any actual "upgrades" available. Each model newer than mine is a downgrade in various ways - fewer ports, stupid touch bar thing replacing the function keys and escape key (I'm a vi user - ugh!), different power adapter (WTF?!?!?), etc. In addition to these literal downgrades there are no real upgrades to be had. I have 16GB of memory, I think they might have 32 now but, geeze, come on. Drive space? Not only do I have to pay out the ass for a flash drive, I can't easily connect external hard drives now since the ports are screwed up.

    Just, stupid.

    Apple led the way back when it made sense - getting rid of floppies (the time was right), getting rid of DVD drive (the time was right). But this is no longer leadership, it's just stupidity. People are still going to use external drives for some time - people like will likely use them indefinitely. I use a laptop with an external monitor (in my case a 49" UHD TV) - I need extra ports.

    I've invested a ton in Apple hardware over the last 10 years, but when I have to buy another computer it's probably going to be running Linux. I have to keep a Mac or Windows machine around for Photoshop and such.

    • Are there enough people who need a more powerful machine to justify them? Iget that you need an upgrade, but who else does?

      I am in the middle of replacing my 2009-era desktop (Core 2 Duo 2.9ghz, Geforce GT 240, 4 GB RAM), with an entry level Surface Pro 4 (Core M3 dual core 2.0ghz, integrated graphics, 4GB RAM.)

      It seems my computing needs have not increased in almost a decade.

      The USB C type port should provide more than enough bandwidth for an external drive. I don't see it as an issue for that speci
      • I'm sure there are exceptions, but for most of us - the rate of improvement with processors has far outstripped any growth in our need for that processing power. If it weren't for unnecessary bloat in macOS (or Windows) itself, I bet most of us could get along reasonably well with 10-year-old machines.

      • Well that was the whole point of the Pro models. Yes most users like yourself (based on the specifications of your Surface) would do just fine with the Macbook Air, the Pro was the one for those people who required a higher performance machine for their use cases. If they aren't providing that then what's the point of Pro model at all?
        • This is the exact reason why professionals feel that Apple has abandoned them. If I wanted a FaceBook Air, then I would have bought one. But I actually do real work, and work requires connecting to networks, to presentation screens, etc.

          Apple has forgotten that. They think that anything outside of directly working with the build in keyboard and screen is some kind of outlier use case and expect people to buy dongles for everything. HDMI and Ethernet will be around long after the current generations of MB

    • And there were people just like you who griped about losing floppy drives and optical drives and somehow the world survived. Apple still makes the best computers and OS, you just need to get a grip and learn to adapt to changes instead of complaining when it happens, because it will always happen and will always continue to happen. If you base your happiness on external forces you will never be happy.
      • Changes to make something better are one thing, changes for change's sake is pointless and pushes your customers away to competing products.

        • by Trailer Trash ( 60756 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @04:41PM (#55373857) Homepage

          This is exactly the issue - change for the sake of change. There was literally no reason to change the power adapter. None. Removing USB ports? Stupid. It almost certainly still uses USB internally for the camera, keyboard, and trackpad, so it's not like the hardware isn't there. The function keys? This might possibly have been a step forward - at least it has the potential to be better. But internal testing should have revealed it to be annoying rather than more useful.

          When they removed the floppy drive I thought it was the right move - same with optical storage drives. It's just too early for external drives and their core market (design and creative professionals) are the ones who are most likely to use external hard drives. As I said, I'll always need them. I have 7+ TB of music on Amazon S3 now, I'm dealing with datasets that are just too big to move around online (we have to ship drives to Amazon for imports).

          • Just because you don't understand the reason for a change doesn't mean there was no reason.
            • But we are the users of those products. If as their users we can't understand the reason for the changes, it means the reason is either non-existant or totally pointless.

              • by Dog-Cow ( 21281 )

                Just because you don't know the reason does not mean there isn't one. It could be that the millions of other users are aware of the reason, and you're just and ignorant shit-wad.

          • When they removed the floppy drive I thought it was the right move - same with optical storage drives.

            I think they were slightly premature on floppies. The first iMac did not have a CD burner (only a CD-ROM, or DVD-ROM drive), and USB flash drives had yet to be invented, so there was no good option to transport files. Not near as many people had high speed internet, and "cloud storage" wasn't a thing. Even storing an attachment in your inbox wasn't an option, because Hotmail at the time had something like a 2MB mailbox size.

            The good news is the iMac did drive the popularity of USB peripherals. Especially pe

            • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

              The worst aspect was using a slot loading drive with no emergency eject pin hole. When music companies started making those discs that looked like CDs but were loaded with malware they would prevent the soft eject key from working, meaning the only way to recover was to dismantle the machine.

    • by Teckla ( 630646 )

      Each model newer than mine is a downgrade in various ways - fewer ports

      I'm not so sure the "fewer ports" thing is a bad idea. It could be that the vast majority of MBP users don't need those extra ports, so why add complexity and a bunch more points of potential failure, where a simple port hub would do? There's already some really nice port hubs available for cheap.

      stupid touch bar thing replacing the function keys

      I find the Touch Bar utterly mystifying. If Apple has decided to admit that touch has a place on laptops, why not make the whole screen touch capable? And upsetting power users that use function keys (that includ

      • so why add complexity and a bunch more points of potential failure

        A USB3 port with a USB2 dongle and a USB3 port with a HDMI dongle has more points of failure than just having those ports available.

        where a simple port hub would do?

        If I want multiple of one port then yes a hub is just fine.

        • by Teckla ( 630646 )
          I'm talking about hubs that attach to a single USB-C port and the hubs have HDMI, DisplayPort, USB 2 ports, USB 3 ports, etc.
          • So a non-integrated solution requiring external components being better than an integrated solution that works out of the box?
            • by Bongo ( 13261 )

              I agree it is better to have the port you need already in the machine.

              And what TB3 gives you with a hub is more flexibility.
              But that’s may be just me, as I have older stuff lying around, like eSATA drives and so on.

              I prefer 4 TB3 ports, than one TB3 and a bunch of other ports. Just because there’s more possibilities. Even the being able to charge from either side is handy sometimes.

              • I prefer 4 TB3 ports, than one TB3 and a bunch of other ports.

                But if, like you said, you're happy with a hub and that gives you flexibility then what do you need 4 TB3 ports for? 1 is enough.

        • by epine ( 68316 )

          so why add complexity and a bunch more points of potential failure

          You nailed it.

          Why add complexity and a bunch more points of potential failure which Apple is responsible for, when the user who consistently needs these features can simply clutter his or her rucksack (and packing reminder list) with unreliable knock-off port adaptors which Apple can forever disavow?

          As if anyone would want Apple quality control end to end.

    • by Dusty101 ( 765661 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @05:05PM (#55373957)

      Preach.

      The new-style keyboard and lack of ports drove this long-time Mac user to opt for an end-of-line MacBook Air over the newer MacBook. I had a Toshiba Portege back in the day, which was the original "thin laptop with a bag o' dongles(TM)", & all that dongly junk was tedious back then as well. Ironically, it was the old 12" MacBook Pro I bought immediately after that that turned me into a Mac user, partly because it had pretty much everything I wanted in one nice, compact box. My work machine's a pre-Touchbar MacBook Pro, & although the lack of an ethernet port on a "Pro" machine is still pretty silly, I can just about tolerate a single dongle (although it's inconvenient: I frequently work in a radio-quiet zone, & we have to keep a range of dongles handy for visitors).

      I'm also holding onto my iPhone 6 because of the lack of a headphone socket on the newer models. I don't need even more dongles & adapters in my life. Like the late, great, Douglas Adams, I already have a drawer full of the stupid things.

      And lastly, why are the "standard" ports on current iPhones and Macs different? Does Tim Cook want to own that one?

      The current range of Apple products are just so disappointing in terms of actual usability.

      "It just works." -> "It just doesn't really work any more."

      • Not quite right. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by garote ( 682822 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @10:08PM (#55374829) Homepage

        "It just works." -> "It just doesn't really work _for_me_ any more."

        I suspect you've been around the computer industry at least as long as I have. If so, that makes you a power user who has a very well-established set of tastes for the way things should behave.

        You and I have not been the target market for Apple for about ten years now. Basically ever since the iPhone came out and Apple realized that it was a digital appliance company and Steve dropped the " Computer" off the name "Apple Computer". It wasn't a subtle move; he did it in front of the largest press event Apple hosted, directly following major product announcements.

        For ten years Apple has been veering away from the customer base it always had. You and I have taken a journey, from VIP seats at the restaurant, with the ear of the maître d' ... to a bench in the back alley next to the dumpster, waiting for scraps.

        Or hey, let me put it in even stronger terms. We're the engineers working at the local mill. Apple used to love living in our modest home and folding our laundry exactly the way we like it. But then, on a whim, she took part in a variety show, and Ed Sullivan happened to be in town, and he put her on live TV for five minutes and she wore a killer dress and sang with an incredible voice and now, ten years later, we are a long distant memory, still punching the clock at the local mill, while Apple lives in Beverly Hills behind a very tall fence designed to keep her millions of ravenous fans at bay.

        That is our situation.

        You can call the current range of Apple products "disappointing in terms of actual usability", but that strikes me as the perspective of someone who is used to interacting with their machines a certain way to do certain things, and doesn't actually care about all the other zillion things people use their machines to do [dreamwidth.org].

        The Apple restaurant no longer cares about our tastes in food. The Apple girlfriend no longer cares about what we do at the steel mill. She's gone, man. We can watch her sing on TV and hopefully enjoy that and wish her well, and recognize that it doesn't matter that she can't fold laundry worth a damn any more, because her laundry days are done. But that's the extent of our involvement here.

        Even a MILLION geeks, all screaming in unison about the headphone jack, ... is irrelevant now. Last year Apple passed the one BILLION mark for iPhones sold, before introducing the iPhone 7. Then, in the ensuing year, they sold A QUARTER BILLION MORE. Those devices are "working", for many people. It's senseless to even try arguing the other way. But are they working for us? For you and me?

        Well, perhaps if we get docking stations. And if bluetooth audio quality stops sucking...

        • I suspect you've been around the computer industry at least as long as I have. If so, that makes you a power user who has a very well-established set of tastes for the way things should behave.

          Guilty as charged. I even revert the touch-scroll direction and Mail client layout on all my new Macs as soon as I get them. :-)

          I don't think that I'm actually opposed to change for the better, but I do seem to have an increasing number of "Old man Yells at Cloud" moments these days. The big issue for me is the increasing impact of the dreaded duo of "form over function" and "change for change's sake". The loss of the (excellent) MagSafe power ports is a good example of that: I know that the new port is a s

        • I agree, but with a few caveats. But, mainly, the issue is that those of us using the computers are the people creating the apps that drive iphone sales. We need to be happy. The main purpose of macs at this point is running xcode and turning out apps. So it makes sense to make them useful to power users.

          For about 15 years they made machines that were good for power users as well as normal users - everybody was happy. No need to screw that up.

      • by Dan667 ( 564390 )
        the keyboard on the new mac is really really bad. Who really wants their laptop to be the width of a piece of paper over having nice keys that are easy to type with. It makes no sense.
    • Well said, TT! While I am a (very happy) Linux user, I keep up with the Mac side of things and at one time considered one for Garage Band, mainly, but the combination of cost, limitations and just general fuckery kept me away. Glad I decided to stay away and have hardware flexibility - albeit at the cost of fiddling like mad with sound stuff. :-)
    • Agreed on the spec stagnation lately, especially at the price point, which actually increased with that touch bar. But you do realize that your argument about getting rid of legacy USB, Thunderbolt, and such is the exact same argument that the naysayers made when the original iMac shipped without SCSI, ADB, and Serial ports, right?

      Personally, I like the "one universal port & cable for everything" approach. I do regret the loss of MagSafe though. And they did waste an opportunity there. I really of w

    • You clearly didn't pay all that much attention when Jobs was still running the company because they did pretty much the same thing back then...

      Not only did they start the trend of slimming down the IO under Jobs, removing things people used was more or less tradition with Jobs. People complained the exact same way you're doing right now when Apple decided not to include a built-in floppy drive in the original iMac. They also complained the same way when Apple removed the CD drives along with built-in Fir
    • Apple led the way back when it made sense - getting rid of floppies (the time was right), getting rid of DVD drive (the time was right). But this is no longer leadership, it's just stupidity. People are still going to use external drives for some time - people like will likely use them indefinitely

      Iâ(TM)m pretty sure thatâ(TM)s exactly what people said back when they were getting rid of floppies and dvd drives.

  • So when are we getting a touchbar-less MBP?
    • Yes, this. Also, how about a real MBP that has a 17' display?
      • by Teckla ( 630646 )

        Yes, this. Also, how about a real MBP that has a 17' display?

        A laptop with an integrated projector? Interesting idea...

        You could make the desktop wallpaper Stonehenge! That would be awesome.

  • by Gravis Zero ( 934156 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @03:44PM (#55373629)

    Our current society rewards the selfish and conceited but the laws of physics don't give a shit about that.

  • Oh bulls$&t. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday October 15, 2017 @03:54PM (#55373671)

    Steve Jobs valued humility and admitting it when wrong? He literally told everyone experiencing a real, flawed antenna design in their phones that *they* were holding it wrong.

    First link for "you're holding it wrong": http://edition.cnn.com/2010/TECH/mobile/06/25/iphone.problems.response/

    This is a bullcrap attempt to further deify Jobs, reality be damned. Thank heavens some of us have and always will be immune to the supposed distortion field.

    Captcha: conjure

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      He literally told everyone experiencing a real, flawed antenna design in their phones that *they* were holding it wrong.

      Either you're using literally wrong, or you're just wrong. Either way, your statement is wrong. He never said those words, in that order or any other order. Literally or figuratively. I'm all about bashing Jobs for what he did wrong, but let's not make up stuff.

      His exact words were if you were experiencing this problem and did not have a case on the phone was "Just avoid holding it in that way" while Apple looked to update the software.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        OP here. All right, I should not have used the word "literally". Substitute 'essentially' and I think it reads as intended. I did not put double quotes around the rest of that sentence so I wasn't intended to assert he said exactly those words. I still stand by my assertion he blamed the users for a product flaw.

      • while Apple looked to update the software.

        For a hardware problem. Ladies and gentlemen, I present our current fucked up world.

        • Re:Oh bulls$&t. (Score:4, Insightful)

          by blindseer ( 891256 ) <blindseer&earthlink,net> on Monday October 16, 2017 @12:24AM (#55375167)

          Lots of hardware problems are fixed in software. Perhaps "fixed" is not the right word, perhaps "addressed" or "mitigated".

          My brother mentioned his new truck didn't squeal the tires like his old truck, despite having a more powerful engine. He found out that the engine control unit would not allow a rapid increase in engine power, overriding the throttle input. This was done because the manufacturer found out that if there was slack in the linkages and the power was increased to quickly the parts of the drive train slamming together would cause premature wear. Rather than redesign the drive train to handle the larger engine torque with heavier components the engine control was changed to prevent this wear. This gave the impression of a less powerful engine since the truck would not squeal its tires as readily or push passengers into their seats like older models. It also made their trucks last longer, reduced warranty claims, and made the makers more money in making the trucks more valuable to those that lacked a lead foot.

          That's one example of a software fix for a hardware problem. Perhaps not ideal but if software can make a hardware problem seem to disappear then I have to ask, was the problem really in the hardware? Maybe the problem was in the software from the start. In my example of the truck throttle control I could just as easily say that the software did not account properly for the limits of the hardware, that the software was needlessly stressing the drive train. As a wise man once said, it depends on your point of view.

          • ... if software can make a hardware problem seem to disappear then I have to ask, was the problem really in the hardware? Maybe the problem was in the software from the start. In my example of the truck throttle control I could just as easily say that the software did not account properly for the limits of the hardware, that the software was needlessly stressing the drive train. As a wise man once said, it depends on your point of view.

            Problem not in hardware. Problem in meatware.

            • Problem not in hardware. Problem in meatware.

              How is that not equivalent to "you are holding it wrong"?

          • Perhaps not ideal but if software can make a hardware problem seem to disappear then I have to ask, was the problem really in the hardware?

            Given how the examples didn't actually fix anything and instead "masked" them and reduced performance as they went, yes the problem is in hardware.

            In my example of the truck throttle control I could just as easily say that the software did not account properly for the limits of the hardware

            So... new limits of hardware that were now magically lower than previously? Again, how is this not a hardware problem. I have yet to see any of these "software fixes" actually work in a way that doesn't reduce performance. One should remember why the software was designed as it was in the first place.

  • by sombragris ( 246383 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @04:09PM (#55373715) Homepage

    "You've got to be willing to look yourself in the mirror and say I was wrong, it's not right...."

    I think you need to look yourself in the mirror again, Mr. Cook, on the matter of those pesky 3.5mm headphone jacks.

    • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

      by PoopJuggler ( 688445 )
      omg, let it go, dude
    • Since that headphone jack was removed, the iPhone 7 has sold well over 200 million units.

      The iPhone 8 and X together will sell not even God knows how many more before the end of this year alone, and lo and behold, the Google Pixel 2 doesn't have a headphone jack either. (And whereas Apple has included a jack adapter for free in every box, just in case you want to use it, Google has the brass balls to charge you 20 fucking dollars for one.)

      If you don't want to give up your headphone jack, then don't ditch y

    • by Morky ( 577776 )
      Apple: Dragging you into the future since 1984. In this case, the future is wireless. Headphone jack is the warning shot, and the removal of the lightning connector the end game. You'll be able to date movies by all the wires coming out of things.
  • by krray ( 605395 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @04:17PM (#55373745)

    Had one -- and for me, it was worth the $200.
    I was buying into the form factor myself. Loved it.
    And compared to "normal" computers -- it was silent.

    Of course I beat the hell out of it. And heat WAS a issue. Ended up putting two blower fans on the back of it to force a ton of air through it to keep it cool. A SSD today would go a long way, but CPU heat was a issue too. It wasn't so silent any more...

    I'll pay extra for the form factor -- love my stealth.com system I use today for my Linux box. I could have gotten about the same thing for a 1/3rd of the cost, but it would be your normal big computer box. I can stick the stealth in the ceiling and just use it...

    The Cube's motherboard finally gave out altogether. Gutted it and stuck a light in it for the stairwell...

  • You've got to be willing to look yourself in the mirror and say I was wrong...

    So can we get the headphone jack on our iPhones back?

    • Sure. All you need to do is travel to an alternate dimension where Mr. Cook was actually wrong about the headphone jack.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    and suing for hundreds of millions of dollars, insisting that it's a bonafide invention and that their sales will hurt. Is that the kind of intellectual honesty he is speaking of?

  • by 93 Escort Wagon ( 326346 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @04:51PM (#55373901)

    Don't let Jony Ive run amok with your "Pro" laptops.

  • How many other people think like I do - that Woz was a creative genius and Jobs was a self aggrandizing hack? Without Jobs, Woz would have done genius level work somewhere in Silicon Valley. Without Woz. Jobs would have been a middle manager, car salesman or insurance agent.
  • Basic Management 101 (Score:5, Interesting)

    by GerryGilmore ( 663905 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @05:52PM (#55374133)
    Back in my management days, I used to regularly regurgitate some variation of the following to all my employees: "I expect you to make mistakes. I'll be happy to share a few of the many mistakes that I've made throughout my career, if you like. The one unpardonable sin that I will not tolerate is to not openly and honestly acknowledge any mistake that you make, because that shows me that you cannot/will not learn. We learn 10X++ more from our mistakes than from banging out a standard project spec. Just tell me what you learned."
    • Another thing I don't want to see happening is making the same stupid mistake twice. Failing once is a learning experience. Failing again for the same reason shows that you're unable or unwilling to learn.

  • by pcjunky ( 517872 ) <walterp@cyberstreet.com> on Sunday October 15, 2017 @06:04PM (#55374161) Homepage

    The manufacturing flaw he was referring to was the complete absence of any cooling fans. The cracks were the result of the high heat. As far as learning from his mistakes Jobs wasn't very good at that as he made the same mistake years earlier with the Apple ///. His stubborn opposition to cooling fans doomed both.

    • And the 2011 macbook pro which also had overheating early failure issues. And while not actually a fault, the earlier Macbook Air which had shithouse performance compared to most other devices on the same processor thanks to thermally throttling every time it did something as strenuous as displaying a webpage.

    • Is that stubbornness in a bad way, or a good way?

      Because I dunno about you, but I am really grooving on the fact that I am typing this on a two pound MacBook that will remain absolutely silent, even while it's still fast enough to edit HD video in Final Cut Pro...

      I think his real mistake back then was to attempt to please CPU-hungry users and quiet-hungry users with the same machine. A "MacBook Pro" without any fans would be repeating the same mistake for sure.

    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      The manufacturing flaw he was referring to was the complete absence of any cooling fans. The cracks were the result of the high heat. As far as learning from his mistakes Jobs wasn't very good at that as he made the same mistake years earlier with the Apple ///. His stubborn opposition to cooling fans doomed both.

      No, it was intentionally designed to be without a fan. A fan would destroy the very reason for the G4 Cube to exist - as a art-like object.

      It was designed to be a very pretty looking quiet machine.

  • Not very much. Apple is just as doomed without Steve now as, well, it was doomed without Steve before.
  • I LOVED it. It was the first time in my career that my office was perfectly silent, no fan noise.

    -jcr

  • by DontBeAMoran ( 4843879 ) on Sunday October 15, 2017 @08:04PM (#55374467)

    He advised his audience to "be intellectually honest -- and have the courage to change."

    Oh, okay. So instead of doing what Steve Jobs taught you, i.e. "You've got to be willing to look yourself in the mirror and say I was wrong, it's not right." you're telling us we're the ones who need to change?

    Update the Mac mini, really update the MacBook Air and hurry up with the new Mac Pro already. Releasing hardware without headphone jacks and making all the UIs flat as shit isn't innovating, it's moving stuff around to give us the impression that you're doing anything at all.

  • "This was another thing that Steve [Jobs] taught me, actually," says Cook. "You've got to be willing to look yourself in the mirror and say I was wrong, it's not right." In a broader sense, Cook says that Jobs taught him the value of intellectual honesty -- that, no matter how much you care about something, you have to be willing to take new data and apply it to the situation. He advised his audience to "be intellectually honest -- and have the courage to change."

    Judging by the changes made I'd say they wer

  • Now, can we get them to admit removing the headphone jack was an awful idea and put it back?
    • by Morky ( 577776 )
      Nope, and Google just followed them there. Because no wires. And more internal space.
      • Except wires are superior audio quality and infinite runtime vs bluetooth. And you can *gasp* listen and charge at the same time
  • The modern Apple Cube is the Mac Mini -- not updated for 2 years, apparently on its deathbed.

  • I always found the G4 Cube a pretty machine. In fact a while ago I was thinking: wouldn t it be fun to find a cheap broken one, strip the internals and put a raspberry pi with power supply and little audio system in it. Did anyone here try that?
  • Fruit juice and meditation can't do shit about cancer and only hipster morons think so
    • >Fruit juice and meditation can't do shit about cancer and only hipster morons think so

      Eh. I mean, I think they're morons - especially when they're 'cleansing' or having coffee enemas - but except for the sugar, fruit juice is fairly healthy to drink and meditation can reduce stress.

      I can see both reducing cancer rates, though I wouldn't swear to any particular percentage (or even any at all) without seeing a credible study first.

  • by JohnFen ( 1641097 ) on Monday October 16, 2017 @06:19PM (#55379943)

    I thought the holder of that title was the Lisa.

"If it's not loud, it doesn't work!" -- Blank Reg, from "Max Headroom"

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