Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
China Privacy The Internet Apple

Apple Sets Up China Data Center To Meet New Cybersecurity Rules (cnbc.com) 61

Apple on Wednesday said it is setting up its first data center in China, in partnership with a local internet services company, to comply with tougher cybersecurity laws introduced last month. From a report: The U.S. technology company said it will build the center in the southern province of Guizhou with data management firm Guizhou-Cloud Big Data Industry. An Apple spokesman in Shanghai told Reuters the center is part of a planned $1 billion investment into the province. "The addition of this data center will allow us to improve the speed and reliability of our products and services while also complying with newly passed regulations," Apple said in a statement to Reuters.

Apple Sets Up China Data Center To Meet New Cybersecurity Rules

Comments Filter:
  • by Oswald McWeany ( 2428506 ) on Wednesday July 12, 2017 @12:55PM (#54794569)

    Cybersecurity? Or the Chinese government just want to keep better tabs on democracy protesters on Hong Kong?

    • I don't think anyone's even pretending it's about security anymore.
      • I don't think anyone's even pretending it's about security anymore.

        China has never pretended. The have been very straightforward in letting people know they are watching. The point of the GFoC is to not to catch people dissenting and conspiring, but to deter it. If anything, they have exaggerated their surveillance capabilities.

  • The bad guys win another one.

    • Following the law is the responsibility of businesses. If the laws are bad, it's the people who should speak up (and there are many people in China), like they did during the French Revolution, the fall of the Soviet Union, and the American Revolution, and so many others. The people in china have their laws. When in china, Apple and any other company should respect it. That's not bad.

    • 1. It is questionable that this is for "bad" purposes. If it was designed for censorship or surveillance, then putting it in Guizhou would make very little sense.
      2. Corporations have to follow local laws.
      3. It is better for foreign companies to stay in China and make a difference on the margin, than to leave in a huff of "moral high groundism", leaving the field to domestic companies with even fewer scruples.
      4. It is not the job of western corporations to "fix" China. That is up to the Chinese people.

  • by 93 Escort Wagon ( 326346 ) on Wednesday July 12, 2017 @01:03PM (#54794621)

    The claim is that the rule being complied with is a requirement for Chinese ownership:

    "These regulations require cloud services be operated by Chinese companies so we're partnering with GCBD to offer iCloud," [Apple] said, referring to its online data storage service.

    Also, they state there will be no back doors.

    Apple also said it had strong data privacy and security protections in place.

    "No backdoors will be created into any of our systems," it said.

    If the latter is true, it will be interesting to see how this plays out with the Chinese government, as time goes on...

    • by Tablizer ( 95088 )

      If the latter is true, it will be interesting to see how this plays out with the Chinese government, as time goes on...

      Simple: Apple will only add back-doors to the Chinese editions.

    • There are no backdoors. That much is factual, because, gaining access to the MITM data is top secret and thus only accessible by Chinese authorities.

      Trust the state!

    • by AHuxley ( 892839 )
      Re "No backdoors" is a nice way of saying any government gets a copy of all the crypto keys.
      A US brand then has to "respect" a Communist court and hand over any and all information.
      SJW or a Communist Party official finds a comment about the real history of a Communist Party leader? Thats going to get reported and the user found.

      The "No backdoors" is getting traction in the free West too.
      It keeps encryption that protects the message but allows the gov and SJW to see every message a user sends or gets.
  • TFA could not be bothered to clarify this, apparently, but the laws in question are Chinese laws.

    At first I thought this was about U.S. cybersecurity laws, and I was thinking "WTF?"
    • What you say is true, but common sense should tell you that US law wouldn't mandate locating data centres in China.

      Now if it had said Russia...

      TYIHAW,DFTTYW

  • apple will not unlock phone for the FBI BUT are pro red china?? trump is right we need to be more pro usa in the usa!

I haven't lost my mind -- it's backed up on tape somewhere.

Working...