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Businesses Iphone The Almighty Buck Apple Hardware

The iPhone Turns 10 (economist.com) 278

"Every once in awhile a revolutionary product comes along that changes everything," said co-founder and former Apple CEO Steve Jobs, as he kickstarted the iPhone keynote. Ten years ago, thousands of people around the world listened to him in a mock turtleneck talk about a phone. They liked it so much that they decided to wait outside Apple stores for hours on end to buy one. Little did anyone know the phone -- called the iPhone -- would go on to revolutionize, in the truest sense of the word, the smartphone industry as we know it.

From an Economist article: No product in recent history has changed people's lives more. Without the iPhone, ride-hailing, photo-sharing, instant messaging and other essentials of modern life would be less widespread. Shorn of cumulative sales of 1.2bn devices and revenues of $1trn, Apple would not hold the crown of the world's largest listed company. Thousands of software developers would be poorer, too: the apps they have written for the smartphone make them more than $20bn annually. Here's how some journalists saw the original iPhone. David Pogue, writing for the New York Times: But even in version 1.0, the iPhone is still the most sophisticated, outlook-changing piece of electronics to come along in years. It does so many things so well, and so pleasurably, that you tend to forgive its foibles. Walt Mossberg, writing for the Wall Street Journal: Expectations for the iPhone have been so high that it can't possibly meet them all. It isn't for the average person who just wants a cheap, small phone for calling and texting. But, despite its network limitations, the iPhone is a whole new experience and a pleasure to use. John Gruber's first impressions of the iPhone: The iPhone is 95 percent amazing, 5 percent maddening. I'm just blown away by how nice it is -- very thoughtful UI design and outstanding engineering. It is very fun. Jason Snell, writing for Macworld: To put it more simply: The iPhone is the real deal. It's a product that has already changed the way people look at the devices they carry in their pockets and purses. After only a few days with mine, the prospect of carrying a cellphone with me wherever I go no longer fills me with begrudging acceptance, but actual excitement. Recode has some charts that show how the iPhone has grown over the years. Here's the primer: 1. The iPhone put the internet in everyone's pocket.
2. The iPhone transformed photography from a hobby to a part of everyday life.
3. The iPhone App Store changed the way software was created and distributed.
4. iPhone apps changed everything, even how people work.
5. The iPhone made Apple the world's most valuable company.
Apple commentator Horace Dediu writing for Asymco: The iPhone is the best selling product ever, making Apple perhaps the best business ever. Because of the iPhone, Apple has managed to survive to a relatively old age. Not only did it build a device base well over 1 billion it engendered loyalty and satisfaction described only by superlatives. To summarize I can offer two numbers:
1. 1,162,796,000 iPhones sold (to end of March 2017).
2. $742,912,000,000 in revenues. $1 trillion will be reached in less than 18 months.
In closing, security researcher Mikko Hypponen tweeted, "iPhone is 10 years old today. After 10 years, not a single serious malware case. It's not just luck; we need to congratulate Apple on this."
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The iPhone Turns 10

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  • by damn_registrars ( 1103043 ) <damn.registrars@gmail.com> on Thursday June 29, 2017 @10:02AM (#54711995) Homepage Journal
    1.1 billion is an admirable number of phones to sell, no doubt about it. But how many users are represented by those 1.1 billion phones? It seems that few iPhone users buy just one and are happy about it; their model seems based in no small part on people buying a new iPhone (at least) every two-three years. The used market seems to have nearly evaporated for them due to the hysteria surrounding the new models, so it is generally fair to expect each phone to have only one owner before going to disposal.

    Does anyone have a metric on how many unique iPhone users are out there?
    • The used market seems to have nearly evaporated for them due to the hysteria surrounding the new models, so it is generally fair to expect each phone to have only one owner before going to disposal.

      What? The used market for most smart phones much less the iPhone is terrible as newer models generally make the old ones obsolete. Especially in the Android market where updates stop much earlier than Apple's ecosystem. These days you can keep a phone longer than 3 years with iOS and might have updates still coming.The oldest phone compatible with the upcoming iOS 11 is the 5S which was released Sept 2013. With Android it has always been "depends"**

      **Mileage may vary with manufacturer, model, version, and

      • What? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by JBMcB ( 73720 ) on Thursday June 29, 2017 @10:22AM (#54712127)

        I used an iPhone 4S until about a year ago. I bought it off lease at the tail end of it's production. I then upgraded to an iPhone 5 which I'm using now with the latest iOS.

        Not sure what you mean by old models are "obsolete" The Asus Android tablet I bought a year ago is still stuck on 5.1 with no signs that they will offer an update to 6, much less 7.

        • Man, no need of strike back. He is just asking about the unique number of users. Even you're mentioning that 1, 2, 3, 4 and variations are obsolete.
      • The used market seems to have nearly evaporated for them due to the hysteria surrounding the new models, so it is generally fair to expect each phone to have only one owner before going to disposal.

        What? The used market for most smart phones much less the iPhone is terrible as newer models generally make the old ones obsolete. Especially in the Android market where updates stop much earlier than Apple's ecosystem. These days you can keep a phone longer than 3 years with iOS and might have updates still coming.The oldest phone compatible with the upcoming iOS 11 is the 5S which was released Sept 2013. With Android it has always been "depends"**

        **Mileage may vary with manufacturer, model, version, and carrier.

        Well, regardless of the market for used iPhones, at least it has one. Android, OTOH, doesn't have a used market; because Android phones are almost always obsolete, at least software-wise, even before they are released.

    • by ShanghaiBill ( 739463 ) on Thursday June 29, 2017 @10:17AM (#54712095)

      Does anyone have a metric on how many unique iPhone users are out there?

      There are roughly 700 million iPhones [fortune.com] in active use. About 200 million of those are 2nd hand.

      Roughly 60% of the people in the world, or about 5 billion people, have a cell phone (more than have toilets). But many of those are not smartphones.

      • Does anyone have a metric on how many unique iPhone users are out there?

        There are roughly 700 million iPhones in active use. About 200 million of those are 2nd hand.

        That is an interesting estimate, though it doesn't say much about the number of users. We don't know how many of those are in the hands of people who own multiple iPhones, how many are work phones, etc. It's a good start but not complete.

    • I can tell the you're going to make a very critical marketing decision based on whatever answer some random Internet person gives you, so good luck!

      I hope you get your answer, and that it's accurate! If you are thinking of making a plastic iPhone holder or an app that tells you whether reddit is up or down at the moment, and there is a 402 million person market for it, your development expense may be justified, but if there are only 216 million possible customers, you're never going to make back your inves

    • Here in the UK most people seem to have contracts with a "free" phone (i.e. no up front cost but hefty monthly cost) which they replace every two years. This is regardless of whether it's Apple or Android, and was more or the less the case back when it was just a choice between the latest Nokia or Motorola dumb phone.
  • An great leap forward in marketing and in improving the efficiency of the surveillance state. It turns out spying is cheaper and easier if you let the private sector do it for you.

    • I think you're confusing Apple with Facebook. Apple's devices are just a conduit, while the actual surveillance data is all going through and being stored in Facebook. Blaming Apple for this would be like blaming BP gas for motor vehicle accidents; sure if it wasn't there at all it would be slightly more difficult but there were other more pressing factors.

      And certainly, someone else would have combined all this into one device eventually regardless of whether or not Apple was the first to do it in a
    • An great leap forward in marketing and in improving the efficiency of the surveillance state. It turns out spying is cheaper and easier if you let the private sector do it for you.

      Mods? Dear GOD! How is the Parent "Insightful"???

      More like "INsightful", as in TROLLISH!

  • by __aaclcg7560 ( 824291 ) on Thursday June 29, 2017 @10:14AM (#54712067)
    I took the train up to San Francisco to see the iPhone under the domed glass after Steve Jobs gave his keynote address at the MacWorld Expo 2007. I wouldn't get an iPhone for another seven years as the Great Recession came and went, picking up an iPhone 5C and later an iPhone 6s. Thinking about upgrading to the Red iPhone 7 in the near future.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 29, 2017 @10:18AM (#54712105)
    I used to work at Neopoint in San Diego. It was the company that kick started the internet connected phone, but now we call it a "feature phone." Back then it was called "smart phone", but now it doesn't look so smart. We build location awareness into the phone in 2000 and had several location aware applications. It was 5 years ahead of the time, but the interface sucked. It had a key pad and a small LCD screen.

    Lots of companies could have invented the iPhone, but no one did. Neopoint definitely wasn't on that path, nor was black berry or Nokia. Apple deserves credit for creating the interface that changed mobile computing.

  • by Qbertino ( 265505 ) <moiraNO@SPAMmodparlor.com> on Thursday June 29, 2017 @10:19AM (#54712115)

    - Make a complex pocket-sized super-computer usable for normal people
    - Put a proper webbrowser into a pocket sized device
    - implement the concept of an online marketplace for software (henceforth called "Apps" - short and poignant so everyone can use the word)
    - kill Flash and trailblaze it's replacement by an open standard web

    My first all-touch device after my Blackberry was the HTC Desire.
    And while it was way better than the iPhone at the time in every aspect, you still have to hand it to Apple: They started an entirely new industry.

    • - Make a complex pocket-sized super-computer usable for normal people - Put a proper webbrowser into a pocket sized device - implement the concept of an online marketplace for software (henceforth called "Apps" - short and poignant so everyone can use the word) - kill Flash and trailblaze it's replacement by an open standard web

      My first all-touch device after my Blackberry was the HTC Desire. And while it was way better than the iPhone at the time in every aspect, you still have to hand it to Apple: They started an entirely new industry.

      -Convince people to spend $700 on a phone.

    • by houghi ( 78078 )

      What they did was innovate by marketing, not by innovation.
      All these things already existed. And they did not actually kill flash.

    • PDAs were already doing this for quite some time.

      Make a complex pocket-sized super-computer usable for normal people

      done by PDAs for decade by this point. They weren't designed for highly technical people neither.
      The only details is that PDAs were usually marketed toward business, students, doctors, etc.
      Apple marketed their to Joe Random.

      Put a proper webbrowser into a pocket sized device

      ...ever heard of Opera Mini ?
      Though yes theirs was a bit better than what was available elsewhere.

      implement the concept of an online marketplace for software (henceforth called "Apps" - short and poignant so everyone can use the word)

      Wut ?
      The well developped PalmOS apps ecosystem that existed before begs to differ.
      Apple's actual only success is managing to lock the users i

    • I used Nokia smartphones several years before iPhone, with a real browser and running other desktop similar tasks (watching videos, listening mp3, playing really cool games).

      The marketplace idea existed before in Debian based distros (mainly Ubuntu with a proper catalog software, but not nicely implemented as Apple one).

      Kill flash: yes, but the reason why they've made it was because Flash is terrible with touch, and with Flash in browser, basically you'd have access to many games that they expect to see in

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      The iPhone didn't have apps when it launched. It was only because other phones had apps and everyone wanted them for the iPhone that they added the capability later.

      The first iPhone was extremely basic. You couldn't even set the wallpaper. Only Apple software, no third party apps. The hardware of the day was not really up to the task - the available CPUs and RAM that could run for a reasonable time off a battery were just not very good. But Apple hid it well, carefully limiting the functions of the phone an

  • what might have been created if the iPhone never came out. Their usage model was very good, and became dominant. What might have been instead if it never came to be? Maybe someone would have come up with a holographic display like star wars had? Or some other compeltely different concept? Might have been better, might have been worse. Think silicon/GaAs. Because silicon was so dominant and so much money was thrown at it, GaAs never got a chance.

    • Think silicon/GaAs.Because silicon was so dominant and so much money was thrown at it, GaAs never got a chance.

      You've reversed the premise and and the conclusion. Silicon is dominant because it is more abundant and cheaper. Thus more money is thrown at it. Silicon is the 2nd most abundant element (26%) after oxygen (46%). Gallium is 35th with (0.0019%) . Arsenic is in trace amounts at 0.00021%. Add to that, arsenic is more toxic to work with, there's a reason why GaAs isn't leading.

  • Apple does not like to be reminded but the original iPhone was made by Motorola and it was called the ROKR. [wikipedia.org]
    • by Henriok ( 6762 )
      Nothing about that makes any sense.
      • then we'll explain it to you young-uns. The first smartphone to work with iTunes was made by Motorola. the iPhone was revolutionary because of...exactly nothing.

      • Apple does not like to be reminded but the original iPhone was made by Motorola and it was called the ROKR. [wikipedia.org]

        Nothing about that makes any sense.

        Well the ROKR did have a castrated version of iTunes installed and if you are a girlfriendless cellar dweller who's only purpose in life is to cook up conspiracy theories about Apple you can probably rationalise that into some kind of conspiracy. You might have to dink a keg of beer and smoke a bunch of weed and maybe finish by dropping some acid but you'd get into the zone eventually.

    • That's just it. Between Motorola and LG there was a definite trend towards removing the buttons, and making a phone that is all screen.

      What Apple did do was jump in head first without checking the water depth or looking for sharks. They took a gamble going straight to the end rather than slowly edging the market in this direction, and it paid off for them.

  • "...After 10 years, not a single serious malware case. It's not just luck; we need to congratulate Apple on this." --- And remind Apple this includes people who have legally jailbroken their iPhones. Something Apple said 'would' lead to serious malware problems.

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