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Open Source Apple

Apple Releases macOS 10.12 Sierra Open Source Darwin Code (9to5mac.com) 134

An anonymous reader writes:Apple has released the open source Darwin code for macOS 10.12 Sierra. The code, located on Apple's open source website, can be accessed via direct link now, although it doesn't yet appear on the site's home page. The release builds on a long-standing library of open source code that dates all the way back to OS X 10.0. There, you'll also find the Open Source Reference Library, developer tools, along with iOS and OS X Server resources. The lowest layers of macOS, including the kernel, BSD portions, and drivers are based mainly on open source technologies, collectively called Darwin. As such, Apple provides download links to the latest versions of these technologies for the open source community to learn and to use.
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Apple Releases macOS 10.12 Sierra Open Source Darwin Code

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  • by nimbius ( 983462 ) on Thursday November 24, 2016 @03:05PM (#53355627) Homepage
    I know several friends plagued with the latest macbook and looking for an alternative, but dont want to sacrifice the reliability of the OS. BSD is an excellent choice, and Darwin helps to inform the more inquisitive mac user that there are alternatives if you can tolerate reimaging the machine, or buying different and sometimes less sexy hardware.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      BSD might be work somewhat acceptably if you're willing to accept certain hassles. As far as I know no one has gotten the built-in wifi on newer Macs or the new Touch Bar on 2016 MacBook Pro to work properly. Good luck getting Apple to release drivers for those.

      But if you own a shiny Apple device and have a desperate need to run Linux you can probably afford to buy an equivalently specced PC laptop that costs 1/2 as much and has better compatibility and run Linux/BSD on that. Either that or use Parallels/Fu

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Apple's still sitting on serious bugs. Examples: One that's been around for many revisions of the OS is the abjectly borken UDP implementation; Apple's version of a supposedly broadcast protocol... that can only have one listener... brilliant. Linux and windows handle this just fine, too. One new in 10.12 is they borked Qt's tooltips and menus, which have worked since 10.6.8 through 10.11... and are now blank. There are plenty more. Those are just recently (and still) irritating here, so they're on my mind.

        • One new in 10.12 is they borked Qt's tooltips and menus, which have worked since 10.6.8 through 10.11

          Dunno. Tooltips work fine for me.

          But, then, I don't use Qt. And one reason I don't is that something like this will happen.

        • One new in 10.12 is they borked Qt's tooltips and menus, which have worked since 10.6.8 through 10.11

          You have always been able to spot Qt apps on OS X: they're the ones that look ugly and where even basic things such as text fields don't respect the HIGs (for years, they managed to have different keyboard shortcuts for skipping words / lines in a text field to every other OS X app), so you'll forgive me if I suspect that this is more likely to be Qt's fault.

        • Personally I never worry about borken shit. The only stuff that bothers me is broken shit!

        • Or they could pull their thumbs out of their asses and put in the dozen lines of code that would be needed for a volume limit. Don't tell me it's already there, it isn't. Headphones != speakers.
        • by sl3xd ( 111641 )

          One that's been around for many revisions of the OS is the abjectly borken UDP implementation; Apple's version of a supposedly broadcast protocol... that can only have one listener...

          Apple doesn't have their own network stack. Their network stack is the BSD stack [wikipedia.org], and has been for every version of OS X.

          Apple still absorbs code from FreeBSD, and contributes code back to FreeBSD.

          One new in 10.12 is they borked Qt's tooltips and menus

          So a broken 3rd party open source library is Apple's problem?

          There was an ex

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Open source is fine and dandy, but the real killer feature is being able to easily fix a bug in the OS yourself, deploy and test to yourself, and share with others.

    How easy is it to do that with Apple's OS these days?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday November 24, 2016 @03:53PM (#53355885)

      The other side of this is that Linux developers can use it to gain insight to making your favorite Linux distribution run – or run better – on Mac hardware.

      Whether you love or hate Mac hardware, there are a lot of people who want to run Linux on it.

      • The other side of this is that Linux developers can use it to gain insight to making your favorite Linux distribution run – or run better – on Mac hardware.

        ...assuming that the code to support the Mac hardware in question is in the kernel, or an open-source kernel extension ("loadable kernel module" in Linux-speak), rather than in a non-open-source kernel extension.

    • Open source is fine and dandy, but the real killer feature is being able to easily fix a bug in the OS yourself, deploy and test to yourself, and share with others.

      That's the killer feature of "Free Software" (or at least that's the idea), this is Open Source. Though of course it's a bit of a moving target for Free Software what with things like Tivoization (addressed with GPLv3) and "cloud computing" (Affero GPL) so what is and isn't "Free Software" can be a bit confusing in itself.

    • by jeremyp ( 130771 )

      Well if it's in a bit that Apple open sourced, it's as easy as you would expect, although, obviously, building and installing kernels is not a game for beginners.

      Getting Apple to accept your patches might be a whole other story.

  • I remember about 15 years ago when I downloaded the darwin ISO and installed it on a machine. It was a basic unix-like system, similar to installing a NetBSD base install. Probably pkgsrc would be portable to it, so it could be a complete freenix solution to install and just use.

    But my understanding is that Apple quit supporting or even allowing an installable Darwin ISO. So this is just bits and pieces out of their code repository that you can look at but not do much with unless you buy their stuff.

    I'm

    • by sl3xd ( 111641 )

      Apple doesn't care if somebody makes a Darwin ISO. There's nothing they can do to prevent it anyway.

      The bottom line is nobody wants to go to the significant amount of time and energy required to produce a Darwin ISO.

      A huge part of the problem is supporting non-Apple hardware (drivers), and you need a significant amount of skill to do it, even if you are re-using code from FreeBSD. They can't use any of the drivers from Linux for the same reason FreeBSD can't use Linux drivers.

      Back when there was a community

  • No It does not compile due to unreleased source code.... Thanks Apple!

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