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Apple Deprecating Quicktime For Windows, Micro Trends Urges Users To Uninstall (trendmicro.com) 212

harryjohnston writes: Usually when a vendor deprecates a software product and stops releasing security updates, they provide some sort of advance notice that they're intending to do so. The least we would expect is for them to announce an unexpected end-of-life themselves. However, Trend Micro released a security advisory today describing two zero-day vulnerabilities for Quicktime for Windows, and according to them, Apple told Trend Micro -- but apparently nobody else -- that they have deprecated Quicktime for Windows and will not be releasing a patch. The Register has an article on the announcement. Apple did not respond to their request for comment.
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Apple Deprecating Quicktime For Windows, Micro Trends Urges Users To Uninstall

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  • by Richard_at_work ( 517087 ) <{richardprice} {at} {gmail.com}> on Friday April 15, 2016 @03:03AM (#51913467)

    Apple simply stopped updating Safari for Windows, no announcement or notice, just quietly stopped releasing updates.

    • by freeze128 ( 544774 ) on Friday April 15, 2016 @03:18AM (#51913515)
      What's next, iTunes?

      Oh please, oh please, oh pleeeeease.....
      • by shanen ( 462549 )

        What's next, Flash?

        Oh please, pretty please with sugar on top.

        Actually, I think there is an underlying philosophic problem there. Content below appearance, and from that perspective I sort of want to give Adobe more credit for at least picking a name for mindless flash that captures its essence. In contrast, Apple's "Quick" could be considered better as a distraction, a misdirection of interest, so to speak. Still evil, but I hate Adobe more precisely because they were more successful in imposing their thre

        • by TheReaperD ( 937405 ) on Friday April 15, 2016 @06:36AM (#51913913)

          Flash is being depreciated and Adobe has already given a timeline for the discontinuation of the product so that companies that currently rely on it will be able to migrate to a different product with a minimum of hassle. Of course, many will still wait until after it is discontinued and they get hit by a horrendous attack to try and migrate. I have no sympathy for them.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by CrankyFool ( 680025 )

          Technically, Flash was first a Macromedia product. Adobe got Flash when it purchased Macromedia in the early 2000s.

          (Possibly few people will care about the distinction -- I worked at Macromedia at the time, and Adobe was considered our singular nemesis, so I ... kinda like to remind people Adobe didn't come up with Flash. Of course Flash being what it is, I'm not sure that's a good thing :) )

        • Actually, Flash is a contraction of FutureSplash.

        • What would be even better would be for Adobe to drop Acrobat Reader, forcing Microsoft to embed PDF support in Windows, just like the Other Guys. Approximately one third of a Windows user's working day seems to be installing Acrobat updates.

        • by Etcetera ( 14711 )

          What's next, Flash?

          Actually, I think there is an underlying philosophic problem there. Content below appearance, and from that perspective I sort of want to give Adobe more credit for at least picking a name for mindless flash that captures its essence. In contrast, Apple's "Quick" could be considered better as a distraction, a misdirection of interest, so to speak.

          What are you talking about? The "Quick" in QuickTime is in parallel to QuickDraw [wikipedia.org], which dates back to the earliest, original Macintosh Toolbox and had concepts from the Lisa. The "Time" (obviously) is from its focus on time metadata in the .mov format. Data over time is the key concept within the original QuickTime API.

          And yes, things have moved on, but the container format was deemed flexible enough to be used virtually unchanged in MPEG4. Show some respect.

      • Don't throw me into that brier patch!

      • What's next, iTunes?

        Oh please, oh please, oh pleeeeease.....

        They are more aggresive with iTunes. Instead of just not updating it, they are updating it to make it worse. You are still supposed to get the hint though.

      • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

        What's next, iTunes?

        Oh please, oh please, oh pleeeeease.....

        Except there are valid uses for iTunes that you really should use it if you have an iOS device.

        Backups - iCloud works, but iTunes backups, especially encrypted ones, are far better and back up more data (encrypted backups will backup authentication information, for example, so you don't have to set up your email. Regular and iCloud backups don't capture that because Apple not only doesn't want that information, Apple doesn't want it to appe

        • When an app is removed from the App store, it continues to function where it's installed. (Apple so far has not disabled nor remotely removed any app from anyone's devices). if you sync with iTunes, iTunes will capture the app and save a copy locally.

          They removed this functionality. https://imazing.com/why-did-ap... [imazing.com]

    • Same with Hypercard. And MacDraw. And CyberDog. And Graphing Calculator.

      What, is my beard getting too long?

  • DUH! (Score:5, Funny)

    by freeze128 ( 544774 ) on Friday April 15, 2016 @03:04AM (#51913469)
    Do you know the difference between "Trend Micro" and "Micro Trends"?

    Neither does the submitter.
  • Editors? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 15, 2016 @03:06AM (#51913481)

    How do you manage to get the name of the company issuing the advisory wrong in the TITLE? You've got it right in the summary? Where did "Micro Trends" come from?

    • and the source link beside the title makes that fail about 1000 times worse. I'd say it's a spell check auto correct type thing but......... it can't be.
  • by advocate_one ( 662832 ) on Friday April 15, 2016 @03:19AM (#51913517)
    n/t
    • Interestingly yes. Major camera makers still use the Quicktime container to store MP4 video. Major editing vendors still require Quicktime installed to play videos.

      As for people using Quicktime to play videos... I don't think this was ever the case.

      • by Scoth ( 879800 )

        Certainly not for more than the five or ten seconds it takes to change the default back to your preferred media player because Quicktime stole the file association again, dammit.

      • As for people using Quicktime to play videos... I don't think this was ever the case.

        Back in the 90s and early 2000s this was often the case (see also files with the *.mov extension), but as time went on the requirement slowed.

        You don't see it as much these days because apps like VLC already have Quicktime decoders built-in to their product, and they just play it as a matter of course.

      • If it's an mp4 file, it's not using a quicktime container. The quicktime container is .mov.
    • by Malc ( 1751 )

      ProRes is really quite popular especially in the professional space. What are alternative solutions for decoding ProRes on Windows?

    • If you want to allow Unity Editor to import video formats it doesn't directly support (it only seems to support OGG) you need QuickTime installed. I just installed it less than a month ago on my work PC.
    • by PPH ( 736903 )

      People still use Windows?

  • by Ilgaz ( 86384 ) on Friday April 15, 2016 @03:23AM (#51913527) Homepage

    QuickTime does power a lot of professional video workload, perhaps Apple tried to say that they are dropping the browser plugin via removing it in an update which is seriously overdue. Apple wasted a great technology but whatever, days of plugins are long gone.

    If there is no misunderstanding, that should be a final wakeup call to creative professionals.

    • by myid ( 3783581 ) on Friday April 15, 2016 @03:50AM (#51913577)

      Regarding browser plug-ins, this article [apple.com] on Apple's website tells you how to remove QuickTime 7 for Windows. The article states,

      Uninstalling QuickTime 7 also removes the legacy QuickTime 7 web plug-in, if present. Websites increasingly use the HTML5 web standard for a better video-playback experience across a wide range of browsers and devices, without additional software or plug-ins. Removing legacy browser plug-ins enhances the security of your PC.

      • by Lumpy ( 12016 ) on Friday April 15, 2016 @06:16AM (#51913857) Homepage

        There is. The summary and the story is completely freaking wrong.

        It's the browser plugin only that is discontinued. Quicktime is still supported as it is a big part of video editing on both platforms. Hell my latest canon 4K pro camera writes video in MOV format natively.

        • by Solandri ( 704621 ) on Friday April 15, 2016 @11:07AM (#51915159)
          MOV is just a container format (as are MP4 and AVI and MKV and a bunch of others) . Containers wrap up separate video, audio, subtitles, chapter lists, etc. files into one package so it's easier to move them around. The actual video file is usually h.264 (almost everything new) or MPEG4, the sound usually AAC or AC3 or MP3, subtitles are .srt or .sub, chapter lists are usually just a text file, etc. There are a bunch of other supported formats as well. Read all about them here [wikipedia.org].

          When your computer "plays" a container file, it first demuxes (de-multiplexes, or separates out) the individual files, then uses the appropriate codec to play each one. That's why sometimes one MOV or AVI file will play fine while another does not - you are probably missing a required codec for the latter file, or your codec is out of date. "Support" for a container format is trivial, as it just amounts to what types of files are supported, what order you're putting the actual files in the container, and what kind of padding and indexing is added. Some containers add more features though, which is where you start getting into trouble with vulnerabilities. If you give your container format the ability to change the kitchen sink, then a browser extension which supports your container will allow a website to change the user's kitchen sink.

          A long, long time ago, back in the RealPlayer days, Quicktime was an actual video format. But it's long since been superseded (it was rolled into MPEG4).
    • QuickTime does power a lot of professional video workload

      Yeah, and they want to power that on the Mac. What do they gain if other video editing software is built on their backs and they don't get a dime?

    • QuickTime does power a lot of professional video workload, perhaps Apple tried to say that they are dropping the browser plugin via removing it in an update which is seriously overdue. Apple wasted a great technology but whatever, days of plugins are long gone.

      If there is no misunderstanding, that should be a final wakeup call to creative professionals.

      I just got a QuickTime for Windows Update for my Win 7 laptop offered to me by Apple's Software Update Service like less than a month ago; so it's not dead yet.

  • by wonkey_monkey ( 2592601 ) on Friday April 15, 2016 @03:29AM (#51913539) Homepage

    Apple Deprecating Quicktime For Windows, Micro Trends Urges Users To Uninstall

    However, Trend Micro released a security advisory today describing two zero-day vulnerabilities for Quicktime for Windows

    Is Slashdot now running on one of those "not always right" chips? Micro Trends, Trend Micro, close enough.

    Fasttime for Windoes deprecated by Pear.

  • Oh come on... Windows users have deprecated Quicktime ages ago!

  • Quicktime was shit.
  • Who the fuck was still using Quicktime in 2016?!?

    Off with their heads!

    • Who was using it in 2010 ?
    • by Ash-Fox ( 726320 )

      Who the fuck was still using Quicktime in 2016?!?

      Apple's iTunes.

    • Someone who never bothered removing it from their browser perhaps? I actually had it installed on my music workstation because so many music-related sites used it for their antiquated music sample players, etc, but that was years ago. I just now went and purged it all from my system.

    • Oh, like you're not playing Myst? Don't deny it, you love your 90's era, QT based, interactive screensavers.
    • by tom229 ( 1640685 )
      Maybe people that liked it, or people that assume it's still the only way to play an avi. I personally still see people install winzip with all it's glorious spyware the minute they encounter a zip file, even though Windows has had native zip support for years. The point is, you have to tell people when you stop supporting a product. Perhaps if they saw a way to improve their image in the media they would have told us. "FBI and trend micro wants backdoor in QuickTime so they can hurt your children". Missed
  • by Mr_Silver ( 213637 ) on Friday April 15, 2016 @06:17AM (#51913861)

    If Apple really have deprecated Quicktime then it would be nice if, in their next iTunes update, they remove the nag screen that keeps popping up telling you to install Quicktime.

    I ended up installing it to stop the damn thing appearing.

  • It seems like people don't really use Quicktime any more. Thankfully, I haven't actually seen a mov file in literally years. Are they going to stop pushing their stupid proprietary video format on their own platform as well? It seems like not bothering with the Windows software can only be part of recognizing that no one uses it, and that it's dead. If your format isn't cross-platform, nobody should care about it...

    • by Ash-Fox ( 726320 )

      Thankfully, I haven't actually seen a mov file in literally years.

      My Nikon SLR camera produces mov files for videos, but fortunately they're playable by pretty much everything, so it's not really a big issue.

      It seems like not bothering with the Windows software can only be part of recognizing that no one uses it

      Windows 7 and higher have had full native .mov support, so I don't think it's even necessary on Windows for a variety of reasons.

      • by tepples ( 727027 )

        My Nikon SLR camera produces mov files for videos, but fortunately they're playable by pretty much everything, so it's not really a big issue.

        If the mov files have MPEG-4 video and audio inside, you can rename them to mp4 and they'll still work. The MPEG-4 container is compatible with the QuickTime container.

        • by Ash-Fox ( 726320 )

          If the mov files have MPEG-4 video and audio inside, you can rename them to mp4 and they'll still work.

          But that doesn't mean that suddenly become MP4 files from what I can see here:

          $ file DSC_1731.MOV
          DSC_1731.MOV: ISO Media, Apple QuickTime movie, Apple QuickTime (.MOV/QT)
          $ cp DSC_1731.MOV DSC_1731.mp4
          $ file DSC_1731.mp4
          DSC_1731.mp4: ISO Media, Apple QuickTime movie, Apple QuickTime (.MOV/QT)

          Also doesn't appear to open in my mp4-only editing tools.

    • They got their container adopted as an ISO standard [wikipedia.org], albeit with a different filename (mp4). I wouldn't say it's dead. It's just so widely supported that the Quicktime Player itself isn't usually needed.

  • Knife the Baby (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Rob Lister ( 4174831 ) on Friday April 15, 2016 @07:46AM (#51914143)
    Blast from the past ...

    According to Tevanian, Apple executive Peter Hoddie asked Microsoft officials, "'Are you asking us to kill playback? Are you asking us to knife the baby?'" He said Microsoft official Christopher Phillips responded, "'Yes, we want you to knife the baby.' It was very clear."

    http://www.businessweek.com/mi... [businessweek.com]
    So the baby has finally been knifed, some 18 years later.

  • While I don't use Quicktime anymore, this just reminds me to donate more to the products that I DO use and rely on, like VLC.

  • Now how am I going to play The Daedalus Encounter? Oh, youtube. That's how.
  • I stopped using Quicktime long ago and switched to FFmpeg. I haven't looked back.
  • If you spit in a swamp, are you really obligated to put up a sign saying it might have germs?

  • I'm kind of sick of these billion dollar software vendors dropping support for stuff at the drop of a hat. There are plenty of community driven options, and frequently packages like VLC have far better support for legacy formats than the new whizbang stuff from Apple or Microsoft.
    (why would I need to play a legacy video format? probably because that's what I had available when I took videos of my childhood pets)

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