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Apple

Apple Hires Away TAG Heuer's VP of Global Sales 67

Posted by timothy
from the but-they-only-make-watches dept.
An anonymous reader writes With Apple rumored to be entering the wearables market this Fall, the company's string of notable hires continues. CNBC is reporting today that Apple recently poached Patrick Pruniaux away from TAG Heuer where he served as the company's VP of global sales for the past five years. TAG Heuer, in case you're unfamiliar, is a Swiss-based manufacturer of luxury watches. Word of the Pruniaux hire comes just shortly after it was discovered that Apple hired the lead software engineer away from Atlas Wearables, a company working on a fitness tracker capable of measuring a plethora of exercise related data.
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Apple Hires Away TAG Heuer's VP of Global Sales

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  • Up to now I haven't been convinced by the stories of Apple's next category being a smart-watch. But this is pretty convincing.

  • Hiring a non-computer executive? What's next, will they hire one from a soft drink company?

    • hire one from a soft drink company?

      Not soft drinks, again, but maybe someone from LVMH (Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy).

      Apple is transforming itself into a luxury goods conglomerate.

      Now what are they planning to counter Google Glasses . . . ?

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Scot Seese (137975)

        This. I have been saying this for years.

        Apple is, and day by day, more and more - a boutique brand. Their pricing is incompatible with all but a handful of wealthy nations, and within those nations, upper income consumers. Their market share is very, very small.

        They make high quality, beautifully designed, well thought out products that include luxury differentiators that are unnecessary for most users' needs. Billeted unibody aluminum cases in a world of plastic. Very high resolution laptop & des

        • by rtb61 (674572)

          Problem is, when it is a tech product it has technological outperform all rivals, think, supercars. If they don't people will laugh at the idiots that buy them and as they are bought neither for use or comfort but for poseur value it kind of defeats the purpose.

          The internet already is doing a lot of damage to the poseur value of products. Why supercar if you can't drive it like one, why branded clothing if you could spend less going to a tailor and get the same thing custom made and custom fitted, why si

          • Are you saying the Reality Distortion Field is slipping? ; ]

            Well, look at Beats. They really are horrible quality headphones, but they have extremely effective lifestyle marketing driven by hip-hop royalty & superstar athletes.

            Their actual differentiators are the very thick, colored silicon rubber coated headphone cord that "feels substantial" and the softness of their ear cups, and the head rest foam. Granted, a pair of Klipsch headphones for half the price are better headphones, but "Dr. Dre" isn't

            • by rtb61 (674572)

              Yeah, nut everyone with half a brain who reads the reviews knows that Beats suck for the price. So point and laugh at the suckers and teach the a lesson they need to learn, don't believe anything coming out of the mouths of pseudo celebrity douche bags, they are full of it. I as a rule steer clear of any product with a psuedo celebrity endorsement, the immediate thought is they have wasted money spending it on the douche nozzle rather than on making a quality product. Now that's the lesson that needs to be

        • Apple makes virtually nothing themselves - they design, and use a slew of Asian contract manufacturers to build their products

          Isn't that the case with pretty much every PC maker out there?

          Anyway, Apple these days makes me sad. I like OS X, but I don't really like their hardware anymore. Remember the original iMac, or the sunflower one? The clamshell iBook? The G4 Cube? They had such interesting and unique designs. Their current stuff, though... most of what they have is some slight variation of a featureless slab. So refined, so minimalistic, so elegant, so chic, so skull-numbingly boring.

          • Remember the original iMac, or the sunflower one? The clamshell iBook? The G4 Cube? They had such interesting and unique designs. Their current stuff, though... most of what they have is some slight variation of a featureless slab. So refined, so minimalistic, so elegant, so chic, so skull-numbingly boring.

            totally agree. like the new mac pro? totally lame! asleep at the switch! practically a beige box.

            • That is one of the few exceptions, along with certain colorful iPhone and iPod models. Everything else is boring metal slabs.

              • I would agree with you to a certain extent - they have definitely optimized the aluminum unibody chassis. I think in recent years they have focused much more on industrial design and product design than outward shells. But no less innovative. Consider retina notebooks, 12 hr battery life, multitouch trackpad, PCI ssds, thunderbolt, getting rid of DVD drives, many price drops due to manufacturing efficiencies without sacrificing the product, Mac Pro manufactured by apple in USA. Next time you go to the apple
              • Reading your original post, I see you weren't talking about innovation, you were talking about boring. Again, true to a certain extent. Their designs used to be much more fanciful. In college my wife had one of those second gen CRT iMacs, the purple one. She called it Aurora, after the princess in Sleeping Beauty. The matching usb printer she called Prints Phillip. There was a certain whimsy in their products that is largely gone. Like the happy-go-lucky youth who grows into the stern and ruthlessly effecti
            • There are references out in the wild as to Ives' design influences. I can't remember if it was from the Walter Isaacson "Jobs" biography or elsewhere, but I read that both Jobs & Ives were huge devotees of Braun and their product design from the 1960s -1980s.

              Lots of stainless steel, flat surfaces, needless but visually appealing accent holes, etc. It was joked that the old Mac Pro - the "Cheese Grater" looked exactly like an old Braun electric shaver, and the holes on the front resembled the foil shav

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          > Their pricing is incompatible with all but a handful of wealthy nations,...

          You clearly haven't priced Lenovo X0 Carbons or Toshiba Kiras. Apple is hardly alone in offering high quality products. And the beauty of it is, nobody is twisting anyone's arm to buy them. Yet they still fly off the shelves faster than X0 Carbons or Kiras.

          > They make high quality, beautifully designed, well thought out products that include
          > luxury differentiators that are unnecessary for most users' needs. Billeted unibo

          • Sorry,no - I typed my post on a fully loaded i7 15" rMBP w/16 gb RAM.

            Just calling it like I see it. And as I see it, Apple is a boutique design company that makes expensive products with often superfluous differentiators. Truly the "carbon fiber and burled walnut" of tech products.

            Your iPhone 4 does not have Gorilla Glass 2, or Gorilla Glass 3 on it.

            The laptops you mentioned aren't selling well because consumers are repelled by Windows 8, the design of most Windows laptops right now is dreadful, and Appl

            • by Mr_Silver (213637)

              The laptops you mentioned aren't selling well because consumers are repelled by Windows 8, the design of most Windows laptops right now is dreadful, and Apple's marketing is ferocious.

              Sales of computers running Windows have been in decline for may years now. In April, IDC reported that world-wide shipments of laptops and desktops fell 14% in the first quarter from a year earlier. That is the sharpest drop since IDC began tracking this data in 1994 and marks the fourth straight quarter of declines.

              Even if

        • by Anonymous Coward

          I'm not in love with a lot of iOS, but I have to say Android is shit. For a lot of same reasons that windows is shit when delivered by the average computer manufacterer with all their "helpful" tweaks (OSX wins here completely, but I hate OSX and build my own PC running Linux or Win7).

          Apple can deliver a good experience for most out of the box without people having to root their phone/tablet and install a fresh OS. Few competing manufacturers can say that, surprisingly. The urge for shitware is too stron

        • by aralin (107264)

          Let's assume that Apple computer costs $500 more than a PC computer, I don't think so, but that's giving you the most on the difference, Over the course of 3 years, which is the average life of a computer, you need to amortize those $500 in some sort of benefit. For me it is easy, I use a computer 60 hours a week, on PC I would accomplish the same tasks in about 62 hours. Those 2 hours a week, over 150 weeks are 300 hours I save. So for a heavy user like me, if you make more than $1.66 an hour, this is a no

        • Re:What's next (Score:5, Insightful)

          by phantomfive (622387) on Saturday July 05, 2014 @01:46AM (#47387141) Journal

          And, Apple makes virtually nothing themselves - they design, and use a slew of Asian contract manufacturers to build their products - making them something of an analogue for European high fashion clothing brands.

          This is silly.....every computer company does this. The surprising thing with Apple is how much they actually design themselves, compared to, say, Dell.

          • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

            Much of the tech is designed by other companies, which sometimes they buy. It isn't a product of their own long term r&d as such.

            • They've been hiring CPU and GPU designers for the last few years and their last CPU was their own design and outperformed rival CPU's at the time.
            • Much of the tech is designed by other companies, which sometimes they buy. It isn't a product of their own long term r&d as such.

              Again, what has DELL ever designed themselves?

        • Re:What's next (Score:4, Informative)

          by tlhIngan (30335) <[ten.frow] [ta] [todhsals]> on Saturday July 05, 2014 @02:35AM (#47387215)

          "Sapphire display glass." A Red Herring. The Corning "Gorilla Glass" product currently available is incredibly scratch resistant and costs 1/10th the price.

          Guess what the glass on an iPhone is? Yes, Gorilla Glass!

          Ever since the very first iPhone - Apple actually was the company that got Corning to resurrect it (Corning actually shelved the idea because it wasn't commercially viable), and the glass has been Gorilla Glass ever since then.

        • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

          They make high quality, beautifully designed, well thought out products that include luxury differentiators that are unnecessary for most users' needs. Billeted unibody aluminum cases in a world of plastic. Very high resolution laptop & desktop displays in a world of commodity 1920x1080.

          That was true years ago, but these days they have been surpassed in most areas. The iPhone and iPad in particular are looking decidedly mid range now, especially the iPhone screen and body. Other manufacturers offer just as good quality, design and high end production but with more features and a better price.

          Jobs knew that was inevitable and kept pushing hard to innovate and come out with new features. Sometimes they were half-baked, but that didn't matter because the hype sold them anyway. Cook doesn't se

          • "but these days they have been surpassed in most areas" - their last CPU outperformed rival phone CPUs.
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by BasilBrush (643681)

          Their market share is very, very small.

          What Apple has the sense to realise is that it's profit share that matters, not market share.

          As regards the brand thing, a brand is a promise of quality. And so you only get to be a premium brand by delivering premium quality. Marketing and expensive prices alone don't cut it for long.

        • This. I have been saying this for years.

          Apple is, and day by day, more and more - a boutique brand.

          http://www.cnet.com/news/samsung-adds-swarovski-bling-and-bedazzle-to-its-galaxy-s5/ [cnet.com] - Samsung is the boutique-meister.

    • Hiring a non-computer executive? What's next, will they hire one from a soft drink company?

      more like, hiring a tag heuer exec for iwatches, hiring the burberry CEO to be SVP retail, hiring a YSL exec for "special projects". apple is going high fashion!

    • Hiring a non-computer executive? What's next, will they hire one from a soft drink company?

      More importantly: Apple hiring anybody? Must be about iWatch. Apple on medical tech hiring spree, a possible hint of iWatch plans [reuters.com].

      Apple hires somebody who worked for high-end fashion house Yves Saint Laurent? Let's ignore that YSL hired somebody formerly working at Apple and didn't go into making computers or smartphones - coincidently the same guy.

      Apple hires anybody: pundits say its a replacement for Tim Cook.

    • by gstoddart (321705)

      Hiring a non-computer executive? What's next, will they hire one from a soft drink company?

      He comes from a company which makes and sells watches. He knows about making and selling watches, and what people look for in a watch.

      Apple is rumored to be getting into the business of making smart watches.

      I don't think this is nearly as crazy as you seem to think it is.

  • That Apple sells overpriced shit for posers.

  • Great so now I can get a smart watch that is 1mm thinner and twice the price and one piece of aluminum, big deal!

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