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Apple Technology

Private Collector Builds Apple Pop-Up Museum 73

Posted by samzenpus
from the exhibit-in-the-hallway dept.
David Greelish, Founder of the Atlanta Historical Computing Society, has taken it upon himself to "tell the story of Apple.” Greelish partnered with Lonnie Mimms, a local computer collector, with a museum-quality exhibit dubbed the "Apple Pop-Up Museum." From the article: "...Mimms wanted to focus specifically on Apple—partly because of Steve Jobs' recent passing, but also because of Apple's 'overwhelming success and stardom.' And so the two teamed together to create the Apple Pop-Up Museum, which will be part of the Vintage Computer Festival Southeast 1.0 when it opens in Atlanta on April 20 and 21, 2013. In a twist of historical fate, the show will be held in an old CompUSA store, with 6,000 feet of the CompUSA regional corporate offices being used for the Apple Pop-Up museum. '[Mimms] and his staff are literally building a museum within the separate rooms,' Greelish told Ars."
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Private Collector Builds Apple Pop-Up Museum

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  • Historical or not, who is going to pay $15 to look at a bunch on old Apple computers?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by sixminuteabs (1452973)
      I can start with all of the jackasses who have the stickers on their rear windshield. After that, the dumbasses who wait in line for more than 24 hours to get the iphone 4s. Add anyone ever stupid enough to pay $100 for MobileMe service. This guy is going to make a fortune.
      • by Sponge Bath (413667) on Friday March 29, 2013 @10:49AM (#43311485)
        Did someone owning an Apple product hurt you? You are displaying a bizarre obsession.
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by jedidiah (1196)

          It's 2013. Standing in line for days for some consumer product that you can have shipped to your door the moment it's available is just retarded. It's like some kind of throwback to the 70s.

          It's pretty much the opposite of the trendiness that Apple is trying to sell.

          • by Golddess (1361003)

            Standing in line for days for some consumer product that you can have shipped to your door the moment it's available is just retarded.

            Maybe I misunderstand something, but I thought it wouldn't be shipped the moment it's released. That due to the volume of pre-orders, it could several weeks before the person gets their shiney if they were to order online vs waiting out in the cold rain.

            Now whether the shortage is an actual shortage, or a manufactured shortage, I don't know.

          • Actually, standing in line, even camping out overnight, was retarded in the '70's. Maybe if you're starving, and you're waiting to get into a soup kitchen, then it might be justified.

          • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

            You get to hang out with the other hipsters. It's mutual masturbation.

    • And don't forget paying to be lied to. My museum would be just as biased, just in a more realistic direction, towards all their hundreds of law suits they lost, law violations, unfair practices, unfair pricing, bad staff, bad support, bad design, illegal design and materials, horrible product flops, monopoly abuse, and how impossible to work with Steve Jobs was and how much other employees hated him. Oh and don't forget his 25 year long obsession with not putting fans into things which caused horrible ove
  • by Anonymous Coward

    It's a good thing the author made it clear that they were building a museum in the literal sense of the phrase. Otherwise, I might have needed to look at the context of the article about museum building to determine that 'museum building' in this case was not the oft-used figurative sense of 'museum building'.

  • popup? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by anagama (611277) <obamaisaneocon@nothingchanged.org> on Friday March 29, 2013 @10:37AM (#43311385) Homepage

    What the hell is a popup museum. It could have been explained in the summary.

  • Website (Score:5, Funny)

    by Dan East (318230) on Friday March 29, 2013 @10:39AM (#43311403) Homepage Journal

    The Apple Popup Museum website does not load correctly on an Apple iPad. Mildly ironic.

  • A hipster popping wood anytime a new iDevice is rumored to be in the works?
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Slashdot, where nerds strut around being smug and hip by blaming the users of Apple products of being smug and hip.

  • I've got some toast with the image of Steve Jobs on it.

  • by sl4shd0rk (755837) on Friday March 29, 2013 @11:25AM (#43311739)

    People seem to think personal microcomputing started wtih Jobs, Wozniak and Apple and want to adorn history with misinformation. Yeah, the old Apples were pretty revolutaionary however The Home Brew Computer Club[1] was where it all started. With the Altair 88[0] and many other people besides Jobs and Wozniak [bambi.net].

    [0] - http://www.techrepublic.com/photos/inside-the-altair-8800-vintage-computer/1453?seq=15 [techrepublic.com]
    [1] - http://www.silicon-valley-story.de/sv/pc_homebrew.html [silicon-valley-story.de]

    • by Anonymous Coward

      People seem to think personal microcomputing started wtih Jobs, Wozniak and Apple and want to adorn history with misinformation. Yeah, the old Apples were pretty revolutaionary however The Home Brew Computer Club[1] was where it all started. With the Altair 88[0] and many other people besides Jobs and Wozniak [bambi.net].

      [0] - http://www.techrepublic.com/photos/inside-the-altair-8800-vintage-computer/1453?seq=15 [techrepublic.com]
      [1] - http://www.silicon-valley-story.de/sv/pc_homebrew.html [silicon-valley-story.de]

      The Altair was a kit, not a complete PC; they mostly selected components that hobbyists could already buy and assemble...and sold them to hobbyists to assemble.

      The Apple II (the Apple I was also a kit) was a finished product that regular people could buy. Of course, it beat the Commodore and other early PCs to market by a matter of months, essentially no time at all.

      A better counterexample would be the IBM 5100 (complicated by the fact that it cost more than the average house at the time, so it wasn't reall

    • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

      This happens all the time. The first computer was British, the first guy to fly faster than sound in level flight was a German in the 1940s. If you do something first you need a good PR agent or someone else will duplicate it, and not necessarily with any malice, claim credit.

    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      People seem to think personal microcomputing started wtih Jobs, Wozniak and Apple and want to adorn history with misinformation. Yeah, the old Apples were pretty revolutaionary however The Home Brew Computer Club[1] was where it all started. With the Altair 88[0] and many other people besides Jobs and Wozniak.

      It depends how you define personal computing. You're correct if you're referring to a computer people can own. If you want to talk about computers that are, well, computers with keyboards and screens

  • At lot of people worked in those buildings and got the shaft when the company collapsed under the weight of its own corporate stupidity. We shouldn't be celebrating someone making use of the buildings if they aren't doing anything to help the retail slaves find work.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Hey, you win some, you lose some. Deal with it. CompUSA (in its original form) died at least four years ago. The "retail slaves" have had those four years to find a new job, a task which shouldn't be hard, given your dismissive labeling of them. It is NOT the responsibility of anybody using any property once touched by CompUSA to pay tribute to ex-employees until the end of time. What, are you assuming the offices are haunted by the ghosts of "retail slaves", except they're alive and just lazy? Funny,

    • by tgd (2822)

      At lot of people worked in those buildings and got the shaft when the company collapsed under the weight of its own corporate stupidity. We shouldn't be celebrating someone making use of the buildings if they aren't doing anything to help the retail slaves find work.

      A corporation is the sum of its employees... and their failure wasn't just executive stupidity.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        At lot of people worked in those buildings and got the shaft when the company collapsed under the weight of its own corporate stupidity. We shouldn't be celebrating someone making use of the buildings if they aren't doing anything to help the retail slaves find work.

        A corporation is the sum of its employees... and their failure wasn't just executive stupidity.

        I worked at CompUSA for quite some time back when they were doing well as a company (before they were bought out by Carlos Slim). I can tell you that the hands of myself and other retail slaves in that company were shackled by stupidity from middle and upper management (to be fair, our store managers were actually quite good but they were also restrained by cluelessness from district and corporate). The employees worked hard and still faced the consequences of those up above who seldom - if ever - entere

        • they were told "you get to keep your jobs".

          There isn't a surer sign that a job isn't worth keeping.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          So what's your point? You're seriously still bitter four years later? You haven't found a different job in all that time? You want fucking shrines built on the sites of every old CompUSA store and office to preserve the memory of Yet Another Store Screwed By Management? What, are all the former Crazy Eddies now historical monuments? That was another electronics retailer that collapsed due to management and ownership doing stupid shit.

          If that's not what you're after, then what IS your point? Has your m

          • They have built shrines at most of the old CompUSA stores here in Atlanta. They call them "Total Wine." I feel they make a much better use of the space.
          • If that's not what you're after, then what IS your point?

            My point is that there were jobs there, and now there are none. There were hardworking and smart employees there, and they lost their jobs because of their inept corporate overlords. The retail slaves busted their asses and were given pinkslips in return. The corporate bigwigs ruined a company and took big bonuses in return.

            Do you seriously dedicate that much of your life to re-living that fateful day when you no longer had a single particular retail slave job?

            No. I left the company before it was bought out by Carlos Slim. Even at that time it was clear that corporate management was utterly clueless and didn't give a shit.

            Its effect on the world was minimal, as it had strong competition and didn't do much unique and new.

            At the time, i

        • by anagama (611277)

          I remember my first and last experience at CommyUSA as I named it -- some bastard at the door asking to check my bag against my receipt. I asked him if he had a reasonably articulable suspicion that I was shoplifting. He said no. So I said "no you can't check my bag."

          Never went back. Glad they died. This same policy is why I WorstBuy has lost thousands of dollars in sales it could have made to me, and I learned a little patience to boot in waiting for my NewEgg packages.

      • by MrTester (860336)
        Wow. Im thinking you dont have much real world experience. Either that or your just not paying attention.
        It doesnt matter how talented your workforce is if management is bound and determined to ignore their skills.
  • by wiredlogic (135348) on Friday March 29, 2013 @12:04PM (#43311963)

    Jobs had a massive personality disorder and treated most people like shit. He made it to the top because we have a society that rewards narcissists. For this he deserves to have the history books rewritten to paint him as a saint?

  • ...before the first stupid apple fanboy will take his/her tent to be the fist in line to visit that museum.
  • He's got a LOT of old computers, not just Apples, including TWO (Qty 2) Cray 1 computers! I think I'd rather see one of those operating than all the rest of his stuff, including his two Apple 1's. Check out this interview from a few months back:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Fu5wcgWdJQI [youtube.com]

    Also, this popup museum is only PART (though it's looking like the biggest part) of the Vintage Computer Festival Southeast 1.0 (hope I got that name right). There will be plenty of classic compute

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