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iOS 6 Adoption Tops 25% After Just 48 Hours 513

Posted by timothy
from the must've-hated-the-last-version dept.
An anonymous reader writes "iOS 6 has seen rapid adoption among iPhone and iPad users, reports developer David Smith. Smith's applications like Audiobooks get around 100k downloads weekly and he's taken to mapping the adoption of Apple's software releases over the last couple of years. This update's data shows a 35.4% adoption of iOS 6, with iOS 5.x holding court at 71.5% adoption. That's a pretty rapid pace, eclipsing Android Jelly Bean's 2-month adoption levels of 1.2% easily."
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iOS 6 Adoption Tops 25% After Just 48 Hours

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 22, 2012 @11:09PM (#41425559)

    Yes, because comparing the release of Jelly Bean on a multitude of manufacturer, carrier, and hardware platforms is an entirely reasonable comparison to the release of an iOS locked to specific hardware, from one manufacturer.

    • by MBCook (132727) <foobarsoft@foobarsoft.com> on Saturday September 22, 2012 @11:32PM (#41425655) Homepage

      According to c|net [cnet.com], as of yesterday Verizon Galaxy Nexus users could download Jelly Bean. Within 24 hours, Apple had 15% penetration across all their devices. I wonder what the percentage is of Galaxy Nexus users?

      Are there any very popular Android phones that have received an update in the last year or so that had the update adopted that fast?

      I don't know what the Android process is like, but I can say that the iOS process is really slick. At this point, Apple has it down to a science. The update was trivial to install, didn't take too long, and was easily configured on first boot. The 5.1 update process (which was the first delta update, so it was only ~50 MB instead of 700+) was especially fast.

      • by Nemyst (1383049) on Saturday September 22, 2012 @11:56PM (#41425761) Homepage

        Apple controls the hardware and software. You're singling out a specific version of the Galaxy Nexus which is renown for having compatibility issues (different antenna if I'm not mistaken) and for being bogged down by Verizon's stupid involvement.

        My Nexus S has had Jelly Bean since roughly two weeks after it was announced. OTA updates were available worldwide within the same timeframe. My Transformer received it a month or so later, and that's to account for the docking station support, specific drivers, etc.

        You just can't compare the two platforms. If what you want is a closed, smooth environment, go for Apple. If you want an open environment, with both the good and bad that that implies, go Android. It's simple really.

        • Maybe you should look at the roll out history for ICS on the Nexus S. Most variations lagged >6 months behind the release. This isn't an isolated problem, and it's not one you can avoid by getting a Nexus device.
        • by ceoyoyo (59147) on Sunday September 23, 2012 @12:26PM (#41428875)

          Unfortunately, particularly where updates are concerned, Android doesn't seem very open. You yourself cite "Verizon's stupid involvement" as an excuse.

          iOS is closed, but it's maintained by a company that has a vested interest in having it work well. Android itself is (mostly) open, but most of the actual implementations you can buy are considerably less so, and are maintained by companies that have demonstrated they couldn't care less about how well it works.

      • by shutdown -p now (807394) on Sunday September 23, 2012 @12:12AM (#41425803) Journal

        The Android process is OTA, same as iOS - and, unlike iOS, it has been that way since forever. Your phone will tell you that there is an update via the notification drawer. You tap the notification, it asks if you want to install it. You tap "yes", then go make some coffee, and in about 5 minutes or so your phone is updated.

        • by jamesh (87723) on Sunday September 23, 2012 @01:10AM (#41426001)

          The Android process is OTA, same as iOS - and, unlike iOS, it has been that way since forever. Your phone will tell you that there is an update via the notification drawer. You tap the notification, it asks if you want to install it. You tap "yes", then go make some coffee, and in about 5 minutes or so your phone is updated.

          You're talking about it from a theoretical point of view. My phone doesn't even have Jelly Bean available yet (SGII on Optus in Australia) - I could install it via various methods but that doesn't count as OTA. When I first put ICS on it it the install seemed to go okay, but then nothing worked properly until I did a factory reset. I don't know anyone who didn't have to do a factory reset. A few days ago it told me about another update (4.0.4) but it failed to install on the first attempt (after taking the prescribed 5 minutes to fail). After powering off then on again it re-downloaded the update, then failed to install it again. I had to install it using Keis, which took ages (seemed like 30 minutes... maybe it wasn't that long but it was way more than 5). After the update everything seems to be working though.

          All the iPhone's i've ever updated (lots) have worked first time every time.

      • by Tough Love (215404) on Sunday September 23, 2012 @01:35AM (#41426125)

        Are there any very popular Android phones that have received an update in the last year or so that had the update adopted that fast?

        Did anybody care enough to measure or report it? Seems to me, some iFans are grasping at straws here. Android OTA updates are slick, fast and easy. Just say "yes" to the update prompt and a short time later the device reboots to an even more deco 3D light show.

        It's possible Android users don't update as fast because they aren't as desparate. I don't know, I haven't seen any figures, except for these ones that seem basically irrelevant to me. Maybe if it was a security update or something that actually mattered. I don't know. It must be different being an iFan. Maybe they just need something to focus on to distract from that market share thing, which continues to slip, slip, slip away.

    • by jxander (2605655) on Sunday September 23, 2012 @03:03AM (#41426441)

      Yes, because comparing the release of Jelly Bean on a multitude of manufacturer, carrier, and hardware platforms is an entirely reasonable comparison to the release of an iOS locked to specific hardware, from one manufacturer.

      Quoth the Joker : That's the point

      Clearly a walled garden system like Apple will have quicker adoption of new software. What's somewhat surprising -and imo newsworthy- is the magnitude. In less than 2 days, iOS 6 has reached over 1/3 of potential clients. Going back a version, iOS 5 (or better) has a saturation level well over 95% in the year since release. That's incredible, compared to Android OS devices, over 75% of which are running 2.x variants, released in late 2010.

      The fact that is happened : Not surprising.
      The level to which it happened : Moderately surprising
      Data : Useful

  • by Darkness404 (1287218) on Saturday September 22, 2012 @11:09PM (#41425563)

    That's a pretty rapid pace, eclipsing Android Jelly Bean's 2-month adoption levels of 1.2% easily

    Of course Jelly Bean's adoption level is very low because what, 3-4 devices support Jelly Bean officially? And those 3-4 devices are a small percentage of all Android devices. Heck, even the "flagship" Android phone the Galaxy S III won't be getting Jelly Bean until the end of September or later. While all iOS devices are Apple phones/tablets/media players and the iOS 6 update is available for all of them made within the past couple of years.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      While all iOS devices are Apple phones/tablets/media players and the iOS 6 update is available for all of them made within the past couple of years.

      Apple has auto-update enabled and often forced on their products and their target audience is not the technically adept. The average person doesn't go into options or configuration menus often, if ever. A lot of techies disable auto-update for a number of reasons, including hacking their phones so that leaving auto-update enabled could cause accidental bricking. As well, Apple's product line is, as you mentioned, rather exclusive: iOS only runs on one company's hardware. Android runs on dozens.

      Anyway, let'

      • by puto (533470) on Saturday September 22, 2012 @11:53PM (#41425737) Homepage
        i work for ATT which arguably has the largest number of Idevices, and as an escalation manager, I have to handle problems from both platforms. IOS6 has caused me quite a bit of headaches since its release, since the majority of Apple users are non technical users and do not live by the mantra if it aint broke, dont fix it. So they update from apple and it suddenly is the carriers problem.... when in reality any software, hardware update should be shunned for at least six months. As far as vendor support, when something goes wrong with an iphone that is an inherent problem with ios, the apple geniuses blame it on the carrier. Apple always gives a resounding fuck you to the carrier because they do not like to admit they are wrong. So in my daily workload I have to explain the "geniuses" are not geniuses". I run jellybean on a 2 year old Motorola.... Iphone users will update to whatever, not realizing that something is a beta needs to be fully baked. I took 40 escalations today over I)S 6...
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          So they update from apple and it suddenly is the carriers problem....

          Uh.. yeah, let's talk about this for a sec. The iOS6 update caused my wife's phone to indicate that it was on wi-fi when it was not. She went to re-download her apps and, before long, she got a text from AT&T saying her data for the month was nearly used up and that they were going to add a $15 charge to the bill if she kept going.

          So is this Apple's fault? Absolutely. So that means that AT&T is absolved of any responsibility, right? Nope. You see, I asked AT&T to put a limit on her data. I

      • by Nemyst (1383049)

        I'd be agreeing with you if you hadn't put that last paragraph. Saying that Android won't gain much market share is not only foolish, it's entirely false. By now Android's taken a significant share of the market and I don't see that shrinking anytime soon. If Google can step their game up and fix some the glaring issues such as inconsistent updates from manufacturers, they'll be well on their way to take the dominant position.

      • Apple has auto-update enabled and often forced on their products and their target audience is not the technically adept.

        False. No iOS products even have an "auto-update" ability. OS X has the option, but it is off by default.

    • Of course Jelly Bean's adoption level is very low because what, 3-4 devices support Jelly Bean officially? And those 3-4 devices are a small percentage of all Android devices. Heck, even the "flagship" Android phone the Galaxy S III won't be getting Jelly Bean until the end of September or later. While all iOS devices are Apple phones/tablets/media players and the iOS 6 update is available for all of them made within the past couple of years.

      What about Ice Cream Sandwich then? iOS6 adoption is well past it as well, and it's been out for around a year and has much wider support, including on the very flagship device that you cited.

      Look, the fact is, this is an apples and oranges comparison of sorts. Pretty much any iOS devcie from the last three years can be updated (though not all, notably the first iPad), so the number of eligible devices makes up a very large percentage of the pool, meaning that adoption rates should be fast. In contrast, the

  • Get a Jobs (Score:5, Insightful)

    by fm6 (162816) on Saturday September 22, 2012 @11:10PM (#41425565) Homepage Journal

    The good news about living in a walled garden is that you benefit from Steve Jobs's obsessive need for state of the art. The bad news about living in a walled garden is that you have to live with his obsession for control.

    And yes, I know he's dead. But his obsessions live!

  • Not always smooth (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Grayhand (2610049) on Saturday September 22, 2012 @11:10PM (#41425569)
    I hate doing updates for my iOS devices. Every time I've ever done it it kills the device and I wind up wiping it and doing a reinstall. It has always worked so far but why does an update brick the device every time? It's happened with every touch I've ever owned and the tradition is alive and well with my "New" iPad/iPad 3. You'd think Apple who normally has a reputation for seamless upgrades would be better than this?
  • Customer focus (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Microlith (54737) on Saturday September 22, 2012 @11:10PM (#41425573)

    Well when you're Apple and have a unique position among the handset vendors where the carrier doesn't insist on fucking with your device software and lets you treat the end user as the customer, and interact with them directly to provide support, then it's a lot easier.

    When you have the mistaken perspective (easy to make in the US) that the carrier is your customer and you should cater to them, shit happens like ancient devices without updates. Not that it'd help blatantly irresponsible companies like Motorola, who repeatedly abandon handsets after a year or so, but may be they'd be more willing to do a better job (or more directly feel the effects) if they weren't protected by contracts and buffered from reality by the carriers.

    • by Nemyst (1383049)

      Yes, and I'm seriously hoping that now that Motorola is officially part of Google, their support will improve, if not for current phones, then at least for the next models. It's entirely unacceptable that so many phones are left with ancient versions of the OS. Google should put it in the licensing agreement for getting access to the Market and Google apps that they need to support their phones for a certain period of time.

      Fewer, better phones, I say.

    • by puto (533470)
      i work for ATT, as stated in a previous post, and the carrier does let you fuck with your device software, like ATT customers cannot use Facetime over the network unless they are are on certain data plans, which is flag created by apple, because they get a percentage of the cost of the data plans, and stand to make more money... not the US but Apple... And Apple rules at ATT is that if you want to upgrade before you contract is over, you pay 250 bucks plus the cost of the upgrade. But then I know shite a
      • Re:Customer focus (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Rosyna (80334) on Sunday September 23, 2012 @01:15AM (#41426029) Homepage

        i work for ATT, as stated in a previous post, and the carrier does let you fuck with your device software, like ATT customers cannot use Facetime over the network unless they are are on certain data plans, which is flag created by apple, because they get a percentage of the cost of the data plans, and stand to make more money... not the US but Apple...

        And Apple rules at ATT is that if you want to upgrade before you contract is over, you pay 250 bucks plus the cost of the upgrade.

        But then I know shite about Apple...

        And this is why people hate AT&T with a passion. It's even worse when employees of AT&T actually believe this crap. "It's Apple's fault we have to charge more for FaceTime over cellular" when AT&T is the ONLY carrier in the US to do this. Sprint, T-Mobile (see Unlocked & Unlimited promo), and Verizon have all made it clear they don't charge extra for FaceTime.

        Data is data.

    • by Cinder6 (894572)

      The Android update situation raises an interesting question: Who should wear "the pants" in the carrier/vendor relationship? I can see arguments for both sides, but I have to think it would be better if the vendors had a bigger say in things.

      • by Microlith (54737)

        No one, frankly. They should be wholly separate. With the move to LTE and, from the looks of things, multi-band and multi-format basebands coming early in the technology's lifecycle, it might actually be viable to buy a handset and pick from the carriers.

        The stupid thing is letting them try to be more than dumb pipes and put up barriers to customer mobility between them.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 22, 2012 @11:17PM (#41425609)

    >35.4% adoption of iOS 6, with iOS 5.x holding court at 71.5% adoption

    So, iOS 5.x and 6.0 have reached 106.9% adoption on his site? That's impressive.

  • Actually... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by sootman (158191) on Saturday September 22, 2012 @11:30PM (#41425647) Homepage Journal

    ... the really funny part is it also eclipses the over-one-year-old Ice Cream Sandwich (4.0) [informationweek.com] as well.

    • Re:Actually... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by farkus888 (1103903) on Sunday September 23, 2012 @12:24AM (#41425883)
      You, like everyone else so far in this conversation, are making a false equivalence fallacy. The only thing this article points out is adoption rates by users when the software became available to the users. The only actual apples to apples comparison to android would require a by carrier and by device breakdown because that is how android users get updates. What was the adoption rate of Jelly Bean on the Galaxy Nexus on VZ the same amount of time after VZ started pushing it to users? I know my android phone was updated less than 8 hours after its most recent update became available to me. Considering most people just click ok on everything that pops up in front of them I imagine the adoption rate is high, since all it takes to update an android phone is to click ok on the notification and wait 5 minutes for it to do its thing and then reboot. My last iphone took longer to run its updates than my android phones have and it required far more user interaction and effort to get those updates started in the first place.

      If I wanted polarized arguments with neither side bothering to think at all I'd go read about politics. It is a statistic, not grounds for a holy war. Why isn't anyone here talking about a technical solution to increase that adoption rate? That is what this real nerd was hoping to see here. I wonder what percentage of those are new devices that shipped with ios6? Did his math account for people with new devices being forced to re-download his app? This clearly doesn't show any indication of software upgrade rates on old hardware, but mathematically they must be lower than overall adoption rates since 100% of new iphones are on ios6.
      • Re:Actually... (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Rich0 (548339) on Sunday September 23, 2012 @08:14AM (#41427215) Homepage

        I think you're missing the point. Sure, the article is talking about deployment rates, but the bigger issue is that there is even an update to be deployed. With iOS you get updates for years after getting your device, period. With Android you're lucky to get an update while the thing is still being sold in stores. The actual deployments are reasonably fast (though generally slower with Android - which I think is sane from a QA perspective). They just never happen unless you buy a Nexus device, and even then only for 1.5 years after they are FIRST sold.

        If you bought a brand new Nexus phone two years ago, you wouldn't even be running ICS, let alone Jelly Bean. A brand new Nexus phone two years ago would have been the Nexus One. If you bought a brand new Nexus phone a year before that you wouldn't have gotten a single software update - that would have been the ADP and it never even got Eclair.

  • Caching Problem (Score:5, Interesting)

    by johnkoer (163434) <johnkoer@nOspAM.yahoo.com> on Sunday September 23, 2012 @12:47AM (#41425945) Homepage Journal

    Apparently there is a bug in Safari for IO6 [stackoverflow.com] that causes caching of POST requests, which is causing all sorts of web developers to scramble like crazy to implement cache busting in their apps.

    Thanks apple.

  • by rueger (210566) * on Sunday September 23, 2012 @03:53AM (#41426583) Homepage
    All I can guess is that IOS5 must have REALLY, REALLY sucked!

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