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Apple Hardware

Geekbench Confirms Ivy Bridge MacBook Pro and iMac 133

Posted by samzenpus
from the brand-spanking-new dept.
An anonymous reader writes "It was inevitable that Intel launching the 22nm Ivy Bridge processors would lead to Apple using them in its laptops and desktop machines. While Apple never leaks details early, someone using pre-release hardware has managed to upload details of the new machine to Geekbench's database. We can definitely expect a Core i7 Ivy Bridge MacBook Pro and iMac later this year."
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Geekbench Confirms Ivy Bridge MacBook Pro and iMac

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  • No ethernet... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by fewnorms (630720) on Monday May 14, 2012 @12:59PM (#39996393)
    Which is a major downside to all of this news for us in companies.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Uh, where did you see this?

      • by fewnorms (630720)
        Right here [9to5mac.com], if the rumors are true of course. I don't really doubt it, it seems to be in line with Apple's way of thinking these days.
        Then again, for now these are indeed all rumors. Here's hoping they do actually include a port.
        • by TheEldest (913804)

          I'm sure they're thinking is Thunderbolt docks. Full speed for all devices including displays. (not that I agree, just saying it's not a huge headache)

    • by gl4ss (559668)

      just put it on usb.. that's how apple rolls anyways.

      • Re:No ethernet... (Score:5, Informative)

        by Imagix (695350) on Monday May 14, 2012 @01:14PM (#39996579)
        Or Thunderbolt. Apple even has a TB monitor with an embedded ethernet port, as well as a power supply for the laptop.
        • I looked at that one... you can't hook up more than one computer and you can't hook up anything that's not thunderbolt. If you're going to spend $1000 on a monitor, get the Dell which has more screen space (area and pixels), and allows hooking up 5 computers and switching between them.

          • by Smurf (7981)

            I looked at that one... you can't hook up more than one computer and you can't hook up anything that's not thunderbolt.

            That last one is a lie. If you had actually seen one of those Thunderbolt monitors you would have noticed that on its back [apple.com] there are three USB ports, one FireWire 800 port, one Ethernet port, and one Thunderbolt port for daisy-chainning. So when you get to work with your laptop you can use a single TB cable to hook it up to external USB/FireWire/TB disks, printers, keyboard+mouse, the gigabit network, and two or more external monitors (if your laptop supports them... MacBook Pros do), all running through th

            • ...on its back [apple.com] there are...

              No VGA, DVI, HDMI, nor Displayport... That is what I meant... You can't hook up any computer that's not Thunderbolt

              I couldn't find that monitor that allows "hooking up 5 computers" in Dell's website

              Sorry, I was wrong; it's six [dell.com].

              Oh, nope, the five computer one is here [dell.com]

              I'm not a fan of Dell, but their monitors are cool.

        • by jovius (974690)

          A lot of people use a mobile network already too, or share one via their handset. I'd think that one reason why Apple is removing the ethernet connector is to further integrate (their) static and mobile computing. Being connected by a wire is to be seen as old, but you still have the possibility to do that if you wish. It's just one step further than before (and you'd have to pay for it).

    • by Anonymous Coward

      The redmond pie article here http://www.redmondpie.com/new-15-inch-macbook-pro-with-retina-display-usb-3.0-and-thinner-profile-almost-ready-for-launch/

      seems to have a ethernet port in the rendering. I don't think this was confirmed. I do think they are dropping the optical drive.

    • by the_B0fh (208483)

      I thought about that. Then I thought about my usage patterns - TBolt display at work, with GigE to my TBolt display, and wireless everywhere else.

      Also, while USB->Ethernet sucks, TBolt -> GigE adapter would work for me. Hell, with TBolt, we can do TBolt -> 10GigE

      • by willy_me (212994)

        Also, while USB->Ethernet sucks, TBolt -> GigE adapter would work for me. Hell, with TBolt, we can do TBolt -> 10GigE

        Well if the rumors are true it would be USB3->Ethernet, which would not suck. Considering how small the adapter is and how space is limited a small laptop, replacing Ethernet with USB3 sounds like a reasonable compromise. It is more common to be lacking a USB port (and not have a hub handy) then to require the speed of ethernet over wireless. But only if it's a USB3 port as USB2 is not sufficient to properly support GigE.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The Mac Pro is dead.

  • and the same goes for Mac products, except in the possibility there may be a 15 inch Air style MacBook Pro coming. So unless they have moved SSDs more mainstream in the iMac I really don't see any reason to move if you have a current or previous year model of those machines.

    Many have been very curious about the long time without update or hint thereof for the Mac Pro tower. There is a good amount of pent up demand for a newer model but even that number of people may not be sufficient to attract Apple much.

  • by CAIMLAS (41445) on Monday May 14, 2012 @02:11PM (#39997303) Homepage

    Why is this even remotely interesting? We know Intel has released Ivy Bridge. We know there are other companies already using Ivy Bridge. Apple's current offerings are a generation or two behind the existing status quo for high-end hardware on the laptop/desktop market. It is a no brainer that, yes, Apple would also use the next generation of hardware, too.

    This is not even remotely news worthy (though it might be for macrumours.com or whatever). Now, if they were changing architectures back to PPC or to ARM on the desktop, that might be something worth talking about!

    • Generally, some of the Intel processors the MacBooks use precedes not lags the current generation of mobile chips as Apple normally works extensively with Intel so that they have a head start from other competitors. In the past, Apple used stepped down Core 2 chips for power savings. Where Apple normally lags is that they don't refresh as often as their competitors. The MacBook Air concept in itself is what Intel is now calling "ultrabook" specifications. In other aspects like Thunderbolt, Apple is ahead
      • by gl4ss (559668)

        they had a negotiated 1 year headstart to tuberculosis.
        and these two cpu's mentioned here... have been out for a month, you can get them from ebay, so the only news here is that apple may be refreshing the cpu's.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      The only reason it would be interesting is due to the fact that it's Apple, and that it's a Mac Pro. The Mac Pro hasn't been updated since July of 2010, and in computer terms, that's ancient. In Apple terms, where they usually don't support something that is older than 3 years, July 2010 is fucking ancient.

    • by wfolta (603698)

      Why is this even remotely interesting? We know Intel has released Ivy Bridge. We know there are other companies already using Ivy Bridge. Apple's current offerings are a generation or two behind the existing status quo for high-end hardware on the laptop/desktop market. It is a no brainer that, yes, Apple would also use the next generation of hardware, too.

      In spite of being "a generation or two behind", people really like Mac laptops, so are excited about what might happen. (In actuality, as UnknowingFool points out, Apple is also ahead of competitors by years: Thunderbolt, Ultrabook, etc.) The fact that Apple will probably be releasing Mountain Lion at the same time, may have Air-ified the MacBook Pro lineup, might add full-width trackpad, etc, adds interest even if it's not directly related to Ivy Bridge.

    • by Wovel (964431)

      Apple is the the high end laptop market, so it is not possible for them to be a generation or two behind. No one else even really participates in a meaningful way.

  • iTunes peaks out at 100% of a single CPU usage in its single threaded mode.

    So I'm better off with 1/2 of two processors at 10,500 than 1/4 of 4 processors at 12,252

    5,250 crushes 3,083

    Any single threaded app wins huge on old gear.

    • You (and Geekbench) may not be taking turbo mode into account. Quad-cores generally turbo to the same frequency as duals when you're only using one core.

    • by mikael_j (106439)

      When do you manage to get iTunes to max out CPU usage?

      I'm genuinely curious as I have a 40+ GiB iTunes library (with the actual media files stored on another machine and mounted via NFS) and I can't remember the last time iTunes maxed out a single CPU core.

      • by gl4ss (559668)

        when it bugs.

        alternatively, drag a season of simpsons to your ipod. get a sixpack before you do.

      • by bgspence (155914)

        It bogs badly with 326,000 songs on an external 3TB drive using 2.5 TB for tracks on my modern MacBook Pro.

        iTunes likes to update its database with every little nit.

        I use one iTunes db to add albums and update metadata, then copy to the big iTunes with minimal metadata updating.

    • by Psyborgue (699890)
      You running it on windows? I've never had this problem in my c2d 2600 MBP or my i7 hackintosh. I have noticed it's a lot slower in windows, however, and far more buggy. I suspect this is at least in part by design so users get the idea this is Windows' fault.

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