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Techrights Recommends An Apple Boycott 542

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the competition-is-bad-for-business dept.
walterbyrd writes with a quote from an article at Techrights: "Given the latest actions from Apple we cannot help recommending that people buy nothing from Apple. Boycott the company for being a threat to the IT landscape and also to common sense." More from the article: "...Apple has been working hard to embargo — not just sue — the competition. Apple disregards the notion of fair competition..."
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Techrights Recommends An Apple Boycott

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  • Give me a break (Score:4, Insightful)

    by bonch (38532) * on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @04:18AM (#38500658)

    Could this be any more biased? Why is Slashdot posting this crap?

    The article claims that "Apple fan sites celebrate Apple patents," but all he does is link to one site, Patently Apple. That site exists to track Apple patent applications "in search of future features and secrets," as the site puts it [patentlyapple.com]. It's not celebrating patents; it's just reporting on them in hopes of predicting upcoming product plans.

    It also repeats the old troll meme about PARC, claiming that "Apple disregards the notion of fair competition, which takes a lot of nerve for a company that built itself on knockoffs (e.g. Xerox PARC)." Overlapping windows and pulldown menus did come from PARC, but Apple is the one who invented the File-Edit-View-Window-Help standard menu layout, the phrase "cut-and-paste," and several other common GUI paradigms that are taken for granted today. Not to mention that many of those Xerox PARC employees went on to work on the Macintosh project at Apple!

    If we're throwing around knock-off accusations, Android used to look like this [imgur.com] until the iPhone came out, and then Android suddenly started looking and behaving a lot more like iOS, right down to the pinch-zoom gestures that originated with the iPhone. For crying out loud, Samsung outright stole Apple's icon artwork and used it in their stores [allthingsd.com]. TechRights, of course, ignores all this. It's no surprise at all that Apple is going to try to hinder competitors' efforts to ride the coattails of its design work. It went through this before with Windows in the 1980s and only lost its court case against Microsoft because of a previous licensing agreement.

    Obnoxious Android fanboyism has reached a fever pitch. Android fanboys are now officially more annoying than Apple fanboys. They've adopted this idea that they are freedom fighters and that their tribe is under threat from evil. It's embarrassing and is a resurrection of the worst elements of the desktop Linux movement from 10 years ago.

    Exploring the rest of the site, it calls itself "a progressive site which supports software freedom and advocates digital diversity through standardisation." Most of its stories are anti-Microsoft, pro-Linux, and present a one-sided view of tech news that's intended to rile up its readers (not unlike Slashdot, to be honest). It also claims to be against monopolies but says nothing about Google's monopoly in web advertising nor the fact it's using its monopoly revenues to pump a new market with a free product (Android), just like Microsoft did with Windows and Internet Explorer in the 1990s. For some reason, Android advocates

    For crying out loud, Techrights' Twitter account is called @boycottnovell. Boycott Novell is associated with Roy Schestowitz, an infamous Usenet troll who spams the advocacy newsgroups with pro-Linux news links and used to astroturf Slashdot with multiple accounts.

    If nerds on Tech Rights and Slashdot want to boycott Apple, go ahead. None of them were using Apple products anyway--they are Linux advocacy sites. Apple wouldn't even notice [seekingalpha.com].

    Can we get some actual tech news? Or is Slashdot forever lost to its current role of flamboyant baiting for ad views? Ugh.

    • Re:Give me a break (Score:4, Insightful)

      by bonch (38532) * on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @04:23AM (#38500676)

      For some reason, Android advocates

      Should be: "For some reason, Android advocates who trashed Microsoft for the same behavior ignore it when it comes from a multibillion dollar advertising company that happens to push Linux."

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by ThorGod (456163)

        For some reason, Android advocates

        Should be: "For some reason, Android advocates who trashed Microsoft for the same behavior ignore it when it comes from a multibillion dollar advertising company that happens to push Linux."

        Wow, I'm sorry you and the above got modded down so much.

        Your comments aren't over rational and contain no foul language...yours, particularly, contains nothing remotely like a personal attack. (The GP does discuss one person directly, but in a brief and mostly objective way.)

    • Re:Give me a break (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Nursie (632944) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @04:30AM (#38500716)

      "For crying out loud, Samsung outright stole Apple's icon artwork and used it in their stores."

      Calling bullshit on that. It looks like the background decor, not the samsung stand, in a larger store. In one place, in sicily.

      Apple's design work is not extraordinary enough that they should be able to get away with claiming rights over the 'rounded rectangle'.

      This recent round of getting competitors products banned from sale in various countries is sickening. Call it a failure in the patent systems, the legal systems, whatever, but it's sickening. If you can't see that then you might want to take the apple stickers off your eyeballs. They are not the only company guilty of mass abuse of the legal system to avoid competition, but they have been behaving like total assholes.

      And no, I don't own an android or iOS device, I'm not invested in either.

      • by stephanruby (542433) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @06:11AM (#38501168)

        Calling bullshit on that. It looks like the background decor, not the samsung stand, in a larger store. In one place, in sicily.

        Not to mention, there are also three icons for McDonald and three icons for Google TV.

        Thankfully, there are not too many fanboys of McDonald/Google TV on here, otherwise we'd be hearing conspiracy theories about how Samsung wants to go into the cheap silicon-based fast food business in Italy using the super popular Google TV logo.

        • Actually, those are the icons for the McDonald's and Google+ apps in the iOS app store. Per the GP, I don't know that the folks who put up the Samsung display were also responsible for the icons in the background, although the first time I saw that picture, it was accompanied by an article which indicated that the whole thing was indeed Samsung's space. But even if they weren't responsible, you'd think they'd take steps to make sure that their store identity wasn't overwhelmed by another company's.

          Bush
      • Re:Give me a break (Score:5, Informative)

        by AmiMoJo (196126) <mojoNO@SPAMworld3.net> on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @06:41AM (#38501294) Homepage

        Nothing is created in a vacuum, there is always inspiration drawn from what already exists. Bizarrely companies think that they shouldn't have to acknowledge this but at the same time retain full and exclusive rights to their stuff and prevent anyone from doing something similar. The degree to which this is enforced varies from not at all in fashion to a sometimes in music (unless you actually sample someone else) to in any way at all with corporate branding.

        The brightly lit white Apple stores look like the similarly minimal and bright shops they have had in Japan for ages. In fact Steve Job's trademark polo neck clothing came about because he visited a factory in Japan where the workers wore uniforms. He wanted Apple employees to do the same but they resisted, so he decided to just do it himself and asked a Japanese designer to come up with one for him. She sent him 100 black polo neck tops.

        • Re:Give me a break (Score:4, Informative)

          by CheerfulMacFanboy (1900788) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @02:24PM (#38505072) Journal

          Nothing is created in a vacuum, there is always inspiration drawn from what already exists. Bizarrely companies think that they shouldn't have to acknowledge this but at the same time retain full and exclusive rights to their stuff and prevent anyone from doing something similar.

          Funny you should mention: Samsung sued several companies because they supposedly copied their phones. Yeah, Samsung!

    • by toriver (11308)

      Argh, mod point where art thou? The "Techrights" blog entry is definitely full of holes, promoting lies and substituting emotion for any attempt at proof for his claims.

    • Re:Give me a break (Score:5, Insightful)

      by LordLimecat (1103839) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @04:54AM (#38500832)

      but says nothing about Google's monopoly in web advertising nor the fact it's using its monopoly revenues to pump a new market with a free product (Android),

      I was with you till here. In what way is Google leveraging its search engine de-facto monopoly to push android? I am unaware of any way in which Android is unfairly pushed. You can get google apps for any of the major phone OSes, and they dont sell Android at Google.com.

      You were on a roll, but thats just too much of a stretch.

    • by the_B0fh (208483)

      damn, thanks for the links and the research.

    • by yuhong (1378501)

      Yea, I never agreed with everything on Techrights and hasn't read it recently. That being said, it is funny that the server version of Windows 7 is called Windows Server 2008 R2 (look up the support lifecycle of both!). I still remember when they were the first to cover the MS-Nokia-Elop fiasco (even mentioned it in this thread [ycombinator.com]. AFAIK last time Slashdot posted an article from what was then called Boycott Novell was years ago.

    • Re:Give me a break (Score:5, Informative)

      by psergiu (67614) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @06:06AM (#38501148)

      To add:

      In EU stores, the Samsung tablets are advertised by the floor sales people as "The Samsung iPad, it's better because it has flash" - part of the Samsung sales training. Seen it in multiple places in a couple of countries.

      Samsung is betting of the same marketing principles used by the following "well known" bands: Powasonic, Panascanic, Sunny, SQNY, Nokla & Adibas and let's not forget the "famous" aPad & ePad Android tablets. Their frigging lawyers could not tell apart a iPad and a Galaxy Tab. http://www.geek.com/articles/gadgets/judge-holds-up-ipad-2-and-galaxy-tab-in-court-samsung-lawyers-cant-tell-the-difference-20111014/ [geek.com]

      • Re:Give me a break (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @06:47AM (#38501318)

        Here in Australia, they're marketing it as "The tablet that Apple tried to stop".

      • by arose (644256)

        In EU stores, the Samsung tablets are advertised by the floor sales people as "The Samsung iPad, it's better because it has flash" - part of the Samsung sales training. Seen it in multiple places in a couple of countries.

        And generic drugs in the US advise you to compare the active ingredients of the brand name. There is nothing wrong with comparative marketing outside of the minds of companies with monopoly hard-ons and their fanboys.

    • Re:Give me a break (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Taagehornet (984739) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @07:32AM (#38501496)

      If we're throwing around knock-off accusations, Android used to look like this until the iPhone came out, and then Android suddenly started looking and behaving a lot more like iOS, right down to the pinch-zoom gestures that originated with the iPhone.

      Please stop perpetuating this myth. There was no mad rush to change Android after the iPhone was announced. [arstechnica.com] Feel free to look up Dianne Hackborn yourself; her word should carry a lot more weight than a picture carefully crafted by some Apple apologist.

      It's no surprise at all that Apple is going to try to hinder competitors' efforts to ride the coattails of its design work.

      Oh God, please stop repeating Jobs tiring drivel. It serves no purpose, and only make you look like a tool. Let Apple do their own dirty marketing. Apple has no noble agenda, they're fighting increasingly dirty to protect their bottom-line, abusing the patent system to hinder competition, attempting to subvert the work of W3C [arstechnica.com] threatening the very openness of the web.

      Their actions are hurting the industry. Yet, you can still find people on a technical forum like this feeling the need to support their actions, modded +5 Insightful no less. I'm appalled.

      • Re:Give me a break (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Dixie_Flatline (5077) <vincent DOT jan DOT goh AT gmail DOT com> on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @10:30AM (#38502460) Homepage

        I've got no beef against Ms. Hackborn in particular, but it's clear that she has a dog in this hunt. Take her words with as big a grain of salt as you would from someone that works at Apple.

        In any case, the fact that Samsung is copying design elements when making its tablet is unrelated to Android. Samsung's own lawyers couldn't differentiate the two devices in court at a distance of 3m. http://apple.slashdot.org/story/11/10/14/2051219/samsung-lawyer-fails-to-differentiate-ipad-and-galaxy-tab-in-court [slashdot.org]

        But putting aside the practical matters (i.e., whether any boycott could even be reasonably mustered), would an Apple boycott really help matters? Let's consider that until Apple got into the iPod business, the music players were all pretty uninspiring. Apple made that a viable bit of industry. The iTunes music store brought us prices for mainstream music that were effectively unheard of previously, and for those of us that were interested in buying digital music instead of finding, er...alternate sources, it finally gave us a place to go.

        The iPhone is remarkable mainly in the power it wrested away from the telecoms. Now Samsung can show up and say, "This is the phone we designed. Take it or leave it." Previously, the specs would have been given to Samsung and they would have done the best they could with very little latitude of their own.

        Apple disrupts markets. Maybe they shouldn't be such dicks about it after they've wedged themselves into a space, but they're making markets that either don't exist or exist only as a poorly exploited niche.

        • Can you tell the difference between a JooJoo [wikipedia.org] and an iPad?

          That thing came out before the iPad, and it had been discussed on slashdot for years before either were released thanks to all of Fusion Garage's problems (and the fact that it runs Linux). Not that I think they should have a claim either. "Screen without a keyboard" is not a non-obvious design or improvement, and similar devices had been tried several times before and failed. Technology not there, lacking Apple's brand and marketing team, etc.

    • Re:Give me a break (Score:5, Informative)

      by chrb (1083577) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @07:44AM (#38501540)

      That site exists to track Apple patent applications "in search of future features and secrets," as the site puts it [patentlyapple.com]. It's not celebrating patents

      Did you even look at the site? Their slogan, which you can't miss because it's in the page header, is "Celebrating Apple's Spirit of Invention. They Imagine. They Explore. They Inspire and Invent." It's hard to interpret that as not celebrating Apple's patents, in the context of a site which exists to list Apple's patents...

    • Android fanboys are now officially more annoying than Apple fanboys.

      Well, to be fair, I'd say that the two types of fanboy are officially equally annoying. However, Android fanboys have 75% of the market by unit, where Apple doesn't even hit 20%.

  • Boycotts (Score:5, Insightful)

    by From A Far Away Land (930780) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @04:23AM (#38500672) Homepage Journal

    Are boycotts ever really effective anymore? There's too much clout huge companies carry with their flashy advertising to reach consumers that are willing to break principle. People are not principled enough to rigourously hold to boycotts. I tell people not to bother with them, and focus on positive buying instead of negative buying. Don't avoid buying what you don't want to support, try to actively spend your available spending money with people and companies who support your vision of the world.

    • by AmiMoJo (196126)

      The trick is to get other corporations to join the boycott. When advertisers started to pull their ads from the News Of The World it was forced to shut down pretty much instantly. If say Google decided to pull it's apps, YouTube iOS support and all other iOS tailored web sites we might see some results. Or how about Visa refusing to process Apple payments? We can only dream of course.

      I wish the EU had followed through on its threat to force manufacturers to allow removal and replacement of batteries (for sa

      • Re:Boycotts (Score:5, Insightful)

        by hairyfeet (841228) <bassbeast1968@NOspaM.gmail.com> on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @06:18AM (#38501194) Journal

        Uhhh...I think Since Google has their own mobile OS in the game that kind of stunt would probably get the feds showing up demanding records for an antitrust investigation. That would be like hearing "To support freedom Microsoft has announced they will support the boycott of Apple with an update that makes sure that Windows isn't done unless iTunes don't run". Yeah i don't really think that would fly.

        As for TFA, yeah that site might as well have a trollface icon and a tag that reads "U Mad Bro?" but lets cut through the bullshit and be honest okay? Apple has ALWAYS been dickish, its not like this is some amazing news, anymore than the revelation that the Ballmer monkey is a shitty CEO that goes through underarm deodorant like its going out of style, Gates plays the little nerd while being a truly vicious businessman, Larry Ellison IS a rich asshole, Torvalds cares more about itch scratching than stability and RMS is a militant. Seriously is there ANYONE who doesn't know these things? Its like saying Bozo the clown wears big shoes!

        Jobs was a control freak, Jobs wanted Google DOA. He like Gates was a truly vicious competitor, total A personality and had no problem letting his lawyers off the chain. Now the new guy is simply copying the Jobs playbook like Ballmer would love nothing more than to be Gates with a bigger BMI. why is any of this shocking? Did you think Apple was a bunch of granola eating hippies wearing Birkenstocks and petting kittens? As the CEO of Commodore put it in the early 80s "business is war" and Apple is gonna do everything they can to crush any and all competitors. if you look at the list of companies they went after pretty much all the $500 tablets they went after because they know the iPad isn't competing with some $150 POS from China. And while i personally don't buy Apple because I've never liked the whole "one size fits all" and all the fashion design layouts being surprised at Apple being nasty is like being surprised when the sun shines or rain falls down instead of up.

        I'm old enough to have actually been around for the birth of the PC (IBM 5150) and frankly Apple really wasn't any different back then, at least going back to when Woz left. I mean for the love of Pete way back then Jobs screwed Woz by lying to him on how much Atari gave them for a game and NOW you expect them to play nice? Sheesh.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      People are not principled enough to rigourously hold to boycotts.

      It might have something to do with people not agreeing with your boycott, rather than a general lack of principles.

  • by GPLHost-Thomas (1330431) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @04:23AM (#38500674)
    Yes, it's easy to say "don't buy this product", but then what to buy? Certainly, I wont buy a windows phone. I don't like Android, hated the CarrierIQ story, and think that Google is as evil as Apple. What's remaining? Looks like I'm going to keep using my n900, let's hope it doesn't fail on me.
    • by Nursie (632944)

      N9?

      Not that I'll be getting one any time soon, but ther seem OK. It's just a shame that (hardware-power-wise) they're a good year behind Samsung and Apple. Pretty though, and apparently a good user experience.

      Lack of keyboard kills it for me though, they should have put the 950 on sale to the general public too.

      • by arogier (1250960)
        It's why I'm sticking with the older Blackberry. There may not be as many apps. It may be closed source. So long as I don't try to encrypt removable storage it is plenty secure though.

        You also can't get much more stable than tiny iterations of the same thing leading to something fairly intuitive and stable. Both iOS and Android may be a full generation or two ahead in terms of user interface, but Apple's too much of an asshat and Android updates are non-existent on most handsets.

        There is no reason why an An
        • by narcc (412956)

          So long as I don't try to encrypt removable storage it is plenty secure though.

          You still can, just use the stronger Device Password & Device Key option, like you should anyway.

          Both iOS and Android may be a full generation or two ahead in terms of user interface

          Not for long. RIM is already a generation ahead in terms of UI on their tablet. (They've been ahead of iOS on notifications and a few other things on phones basically forever :) ) The BB10 phones in 2012 should put BB phones well ahead of iOS and (current) Android phones in terms of UI sometime this coming fall. [Well, I think they're ahead now (I love the OS7 UI, the 9900 is about the best smartphone I'

    • by bluemonq (812827)

      You've got the Nokia N9, and... well, apparently HP is actually still pushing out updates to webOS on a semimonthly basis, so maybe pick up a Pre 3 off of eBay? Maybe a BBX device if RIM ever pulls its head out of its collective ass? Symbian is still going to be around for at least another 4 years, so why not an N8, E7, or 701?

    • Theres always blackberry.

  • Apple not alone (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Tablizer (95088) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @04:23AM (#38500680) Homepage Journal

    What about the other patent/IP assholes, such as Microsoft, Sony, and Oracle? Why target just one?

    • by arogier (1250960)
      Different problems require different solutions. The three you propose have been tested in either the courtroom or marketplace checking them against antitrust concerns. If Windows 8 can't work some tablet magic though, Apple is going to be in the same position for that market as late 90's Microsoft.

      Last year in my classrooms the most common computing device were netbooks (except on exam days when the TI-30 series came out). This year about a third of the students are sporting iPads, with the rest bringing co
  • In other words (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Sir Holo (531007) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @04:27AM (#38500702)
    Apple is asserting its patent rights.

    This is how the system works. Ask T. Edison.
    • Re:In other words (Score:4, Insightful)

      by AmiMoJo (196126) <mojoNO@SPAMworld3.net> on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @05:51AM (#38501094) Homepage

      Actually Edison shamelessly ripped off other people's intellectual property all the time. The most famous example was "Le Voyage dans la lune", a French special effects laden film he stole and sold in the US with the original producers not seeing a penny.

      The idea of patents seems good but the reality is they are mostly used to stifle legitimate competition and leech license fees from things other people made themselves. When there are legitimate license fees they tend not to be based on patents anyway because patents expire, e.g. CDDA and Dolby certification.

  • by SuperKendall (25149) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @04:37AM (#38500760)

    This article is 100% troll.

    Apple is as much a producer as anyone, and there are lots of arguments to be made that they are for more producers currently of innovations in hardware and software than many other companies.

    I find the patent activities Apple is engaging in absurd and evil also. But the whole industry is doing the same thing all over, Apple's actions just get elevated above others because it brings page views and Apple Haters push an anti-Apple agenda whenever possible.

    The solution is not to boycott Apple, for that helps no-one - the solution is to continue to battle absurd software patents however it is possible to do so.

    • by thegarbz (1787294)

      The solution is not to boycott Apple, for that helps no-one - the solution is to continue to battle absurd software patents however it is possible to do so.

      I'm on the fence about this comment. Yes a boycot of Apple doesn't solve the underlying problem, but it would send a clear message about HOW to fight your patent battles. For the most part the vast majority of the mobile patent wars have been about extracting licensing agreements between vendors. Apple on the other hand took their fight to a whole new level by actively getting products banned in some markets. This is now not only a war between manufacturers, but a war on choice for consumers.

      By boycotting A

      • by SuperKendall (25149) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @05:27AM (#38500994)

        For the most part the vast majority of the mobile patent wars have been about extracting licensing agreements between vendors.

        That was true, but that pact was broken when vendors starting deciding RAND patents in various standards did not apply to Apple and they were allowed to shake down Apple for extra money above the payments the rest of the industry was making.

        So if we are truly going to try and nip problems with agreements forming, Apple is not the company to go after (remember in the Samsung suit they even offered to sell a license to Samsung for use of some the patents they had, which Samsung declined).

        By boycotting Apple you would send a message that this shit is not on

        Boycots against any company are foolish because it's a very poor way to send any message. The signal is lost in a vast sea of noise of purchases. As noted, Apple isn't even the most egregious player here....

        The real thing to do is to attack the power that patents have over foolish aspects of computing they should not. Even if you could succeed against Apple other companies would continue to abuse them the same way. It's not even like Apple is a company with pure patent troll play as we are seeing these days.

        Attack flaws in the patent system and you wipe out ALL bad abuses of patents across ALL companies.

  • Too many boycotts (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Karmashock (2415832) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @04:43AM (#38500778)

    I don't use apple products because I don't believe in their "walled garden" philosophy. I was a big fan of apple back in the old hypercard and basic days when apple wanted to bring their users CLOSER to the computing experience and really make their users more powerful.

    But apple has done a complete 180 on that and won't ever come back to it. so for that reason, I won't buy their products. It isn't a boycott.

    People need to stop thinking anyone gives a damn what they think about anything. Because the reality is that in the real world people just don't care. Corporations don't care. Politicians don't care. Your next door neighbor doesn't care. And they have every right to not care.

    That said, you have the same right. So rather then trying to get some frothy public action thing together with promises to buy again if they change their ways. Just quietly buy what you believe in and let the marketing people figure out why sales dropped. Nothing preachy or pretentious. Just buy what you believe.

    Apple products make lots of people happy. Good for them. They're welcome to it. I won't be one of them and wish one and all well.

    • I don't use apple products because I don't believe in their "walled garden" philosophy.

      I hear this argument a lot, and it still doesn't make sense. iOS has a walled garden approach, sure, but the majority of Apple products are Macs. We're not discussing iPhones here. OS X have major parts of the OS as open source, you have as much "tinkering" control over your computer as most other linux flavors, you are free to download and install software from where ever you want, Apple has no control of what you can run or can remotely uninstall / block or in other ways control what you do, there are gr

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      Apple products make lots of people happy. Good for them. They're welcome to it.

      No, it's not good for them, and they don't even know it. They're funding the elimination of their choices in the future. For that reason alone we should all be telling everyone who will listen not to buy Apple products. They're hardly the worst company out there, I'd put much more effort into keeping someone from buying a Vaio than a Macbook, but that doesn't mean they don't work counter to the interests of humanity.

    • by Raenex (947668)

      So rather then trying to get some frothy public action thing together with promises to buy again if they change their ways. Just quietly buy what you believe in and let the marketing people figure out why sales dropped.

      Fuck that. Speaking out is a good thing to do. If people aren't interesting then they can just ignore it. People who are will benefit from the message.

  • by siddesu (698447) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @05:01AM (#38500868)

    If Apple decides that it is time to stop innovating their products (or successfully copying and integrating other people's designs in them, as some see it) and start suing and doing other dirty tricks instead, they would have already lost more than half the battle. Trying to squash competition has never worked well in the long run, and trying to squash it with dirty tricks has worked even worse.

    Apple cannot realistically threaten the rest of the industry long term. They aren't that big, their products aren't that pervasive and they simply cannot afford a wide enough product range to compete with everyone. Even if they could become the new Microsoft, in a decade or so everyone would have been tired enough of them to switch to something else.

    Besides, boycott may be counterproductive -- Apple left on its own can well generate more bad will than Apple pestered by boycotts. So, instead of recommending a boycott, inform your readers about the problems Apple is creating and help them make informed and rational decisions about their purchases. And if they decide Apple is good for them, then let them have it -- it is their choice, after all.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Joe Average will stop reading that article halfway the summary. It doesn't do a good job explain why an Apple boycott would be called for to a public that is immensely pro-Apple. Targeting non-Apple users with this is pointless since they won't buy Apple anyway, so your core audience is Apple users.
    And if an Apple user starts reading this at all (which is not a given - the title alone might scare him away) he will be going into it with "my Apple products all work, are easy to use and look nice; I don't want

  • Who run Bartertown?

    Seriously though I don't use Apple products anyway so I guess I'm already there.

  • Who cares? (Score:2, Insightful)

    If you want to be a fanboi, at least become one about something that matters - maybe people in your life? But devoting energy to things like this article proposes is simply a waste of precious time. A computer is a computer; a phone is a phone. You get one and you use it. It's not like any of them are particularly special. I don't see anyone obsessing over their toaster like this...

  • by sirdude (578412) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @09:11AM (#38501932)
    A comment [techrights.org] by "lkcl" on the techrights post reads:

    what apple don’t realise is that HTC, VIA and so on are backed by – and owned by – the Taiwanese Triads. i find it just absolutely staggering that any company would even contemplate taking on such powerful people. the Triads are the 800lb gorilla: leave them alone and they’ll leave you alone. cross them and they will put in a long-term plan to completely obliterate you.

    Gold :)

  • by RazorSharp (1418697) on Tuesday December 27, 2011 @10:51AM (#38502614)

    You can pry my MacBook from my cold dead hands.

    Fix the patent system. If you want to boycott companies that 'abuse' it then you'll end up boycotting all technology companies. Good luck with that luddite strategy. Every mobile phone maker is suing every other mobile phone maker. This is a systemic problem, not a localized one. If any of these companies try to take the moral high ground they will be put out of business. We should attack the root of the problem, the patent system, rather than the end result of the problem.

    If Apple was nothing but a patent troll then I would understand the argument. But if Apple was nothing but a patent troll they wouldn't have any products to boycott.

"And do you think (fop that I am) that I could be the Scarlet Pumpernickel?" -- Looney Tunes, The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950, Chuck Jones)

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