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Communications Cellphones Government Iphone Software The Media Your Rights Online Apple

Syrian Protesters Roll Out New iPhone Apps 105

Posted by samzenpus
from the the-people's-app dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Protesters in Syria, dealing with a strict media blackout, have rolled out new iPhone and iPad apps to share news, stories, and even jokes. Amid a brutal crackdown, rebels are fighting back on their iPhones. The Arab Spring's newest weapon keeps the opposition informed—and the regime in check."
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Syrian Protesters Roll Out New iPhone Apps

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  • by ClintJCL (264898) <clintjcl+slashdotNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @05:41PM (#38079476) Homepage Journal
    So you're saying it's okay to destroy property, but not lives. Funny -- the bill of rights seems to disagree with that. Police throwing 5,000 donated books into a dumpster is not a visage of democracy.
  • by arcite (661011) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @05:47PM (#38079578)
    Would be rather fitting if the iPhone helped along a revolution for freedom.
  • by perpenso (1613749) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @05:52PM (#38079640)

    praises of brave souls trying to bring democracy into their lives in 3,2,1 while at the same time making fun of the occupy protests in "free" countries.

    Very few people are making fun of "occupy" protesters. Its "occupy" campers that are being made fun of to some degree, even by supporters of the "occupy" protesters and the occupy movement in general.

    Camping in a public park despite regulations to the contrary is something quite separate and different from showing up on wall street carrying signs and speaking up about abusive practices. Get a room? Stay with a friend who lives in the city? Stay with a supporter who lives in the city? Camp in a *real* campsite outside the city and take a bus into the city? People I've spoken with who attended big protests in the 60s did these sort of things. Is there a lack or organization and planning today compared to the 60s, or is there a lack of supporters offering their couch or living room floor?

  • by perpenso (1613749) on Wednesday November 16, 2011 @06:11PM (#38079890)

    So you're saying it's okay to destroy property, but not lives. Funny -- the bill of rights seems to disagree with that.

    The Bill of Rights speaks of due process. Setting up a camp in a public park against regulations, being *notified* to remove your property, being *warned* that property left in the park will be thrown out, might be considered a constitutionally acceptable due process. Requiring a permit to camp may also be considered a constitutionally acceptable practice.

    To be fair everyone was given notice that the park had to be cleared for cleanup. If a person chooses to leave their stuff there despite such announcements and warning there is an argument that the property was abandoned in a legal sense. It is a public park where camping is not allowed, is there not an inherent risk in setting up a tent? Personally I suspect may of those tents were left there in the hope they would get tossed, they were more valuable as PR tools than shelter. The cold weather is going to shut this thing down real soon and the tents will not be needed much longer.

    Police throwing 5,000 donated books into a dumpster is not a visage of democracy.

    The Mayor's office is reporting that Sanitation workers, not police, cleaned up things and that they handled books separately from trash. Books are being held at a city garage and may be picked up.

If a 6600 used paper tape instead of core memory, it would use up tape at about 30 miles/second. -- Grishman, Assembly Language Programming

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