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Apple Hardware

MacBook Pro Specs Leaked, iPad Event March 2 368

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the busy-week-for-apple dept.
Stoobalou updates us on the various Apple rumors, saying, "Snaps of Apple's imminent update to the MacBook Pro range have been leaked, confirming most of the rumors doing the rounds." Light Peak looks like it will be called Thunderbolt. The 13" will feature 2.3ghz Dual Core i5s and 4 gigs of RAM. In addition to the MacBook Pro rumors, the iPad update rumors have been confirmed, with invitations going out to the formal announcement on March 2.
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MacBook Pro Specs Leaked, iPad Event March 2

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  • hmm (Score:4, Insightful)

    by rainmouse (1784278) on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @01:53PM (#35291806)
    It seems everything Apple is working on is leaked and it really is becomming a tiresome marketting ploy, perhaps moreso because it seems to work.
    • Re:hmm (Score:4, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @01:55PM (#35291822)

      But...but...I need to know about everything Apple!!!

      Oooooh. I just heard that Steve Jobs had a bowel movement! zOMG!!!!!1111eleventyone

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        But...but...I need to know about everything Apple!!!

        Oooooh. I just heard that Steve Jobs had a bowel movement! zOMG!!!!!1111eleventyone

        I'm so sick of the Apple news posted around here! So I'm gonna keep bitching about it over and over again on every Apple thread so this ad supported site knows just how annoyed I am! When Apple stories often reach 200+ comments, they'll surely back down one day!

        • by tsa (15680)

          Man all those people complaining about Apple news annoy the hell out of me. I will call them names and in that way display my superiority.

      • Oooooh. I just heard that Steve Jobs had a bowel movement! zOMG!!!!!1111eleventyone

        That's GREAT news! I'm buying Apple stock right now.

    • Re:hmm (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @02:05PM (#35291896)

      I bet it's some marketing ploy from Apple also when we have photos of sick Steve Jobs in front of a cancer treatment facility.

      It's also a marketing ploy when all the news site can't shut up about a smaller 6 inch iPad, and a "cloud iPhone that's half the size of iPhone" knowing full well it's bullshit.

      And it's marketing ploy when random outlets report that iPad 2 will be late for months because of production issues.

      Or maybe it's just that everyone can't stop reading about Apple, and therefore there's huge pressure for a leak to occur.

      The reason leaks don't occur in Oracle or Computer Associates is, no one gives a damn. And leaks do occur at Microsoft and Adobe too, but again, no one gives a damn.

      • The reason leaks don't occur in Oracle or Computer Associates is, no one gives a damn. And leaks do occur at Microsoft and Adobe too, but again, no one gives a damn.

        I agree with most of what you wrote about Apple, i.e., the idea of Steve "One More Thing, Leak And I'll Sue You" Jobs leaking is preposterous. I mean Jesus, he was just excoriated here for not giving more info on his health, and shareholders voted today on making their succession plans public (dumb idea, but it does tend to make my point). And there is so much speculation by the Apple blogosphere, somebody has to be right. And vendors and partners violate NDA's early.

        But I can speak to Oracle. My GF work

    • Re:hmm (Score:5, Insightful)

      by wandazulu (265281) on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @02:07PM (#35291916)

      What's interesting is that it seems Apple's product announcements are the only remaining tech that gets everyone talking, whether pro or against, people do talk about it. Dell might have released half a dozen new systems last week, but who'd know? I was in a tmobile store the other day and saw a number of Android-based handsets that I hadn't heard of. And even though I consider myself a geek, I have very little idea what the Xoom is, other than a Motorola tablet, and more to the point, why should I care?

      I'm not saying that we should care about Apple product announcements, but Apple seems to be the only ones who can generate any significant buzz about whatever it is they're announcing.

      • Re:hmm (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Dzimas (547818) on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @02:22PM (#35292076)
        Apple's marketing strategy is brilliant. Unlike other companies, they don't release products with incomprehensible names like the KDH-4001. They don't have to address a myriad of OS compatibility issues (for example, A4-based devices are eligible for iOS updates, the older ones aren't). They have streamlined product lines -- one iPad, one iPod Touch, one Apple TV. By reducing choice, they reduce buyer confusion and uncertainty. A side-effect of this zen marketing approach is that it's easy for the press to write about their products. When a new iPad is introduced, we know ahead of time what to expect, with the addition of a few easy-to-explain doodads (camera! Another camera! Faster! Thinner!). That makes for good copy and makes technophobic users feel somewhat comfortable.
        • I have a theory that this is why the Japanese automakers were so successful in North America too.

          • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

            by Nimey (114278)

            Isn't it odd how Japanese cars have just a few trim levels and no stand-alone options besides what you can get installed at the dealership? That /is/ very much like how Apple does things.

            • Re:hmm (Score:4, Interesting)

              by vlm (69642) on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @03:57PM (#35293044)

              Isn't it odd how Japanese cars have just a few trim levels and no stand-alone options besides what you can get installed at the dealership? That /is/ very much like how Apple does things.

              The "american car maker" way to sell electronics would be to sell the box for $100 and then mark up all the accessories, so the video cable and the gold plated cat seven ethernet cable each cost $75. Also they'd refuse to discuss prices and only talk how-much-a-month. And instead of spraying rustproofing they'd offer anti-virus installation. Actually that sounds very much like my last trip to Best Buy. Anyone know a good "Japanese style" place to buy electronics in the USA, other than apple?

              • Re:hmm (Score:4, Interesting)

                by guruevi (827432) <evi@@@smokingcube...be> on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @04:42PM (#35293464) Homepage

                If you want a decent computer that you don't have to assemble yourself, you pretty much only have Apple left these days - they're about the same price as counterpart Dell's a little more expensive than the others but less bulky (Toshiba's power supplies are about as large as the laptop for example) and you won't gore yourself when attempting to replace user-serviceable parts (HP, Gateway). I only buy Apple at work even if it's for a Windows computer because of the cheap 3 year on-site service (compared to Dell or HP) and the generally good quality of products. I made the mistake once buying HP for cheap and I had to buy my own video cards because they didn't come with one (why'd you sell a desktop without even an on-board video card is beyond me).

                • by MoonBuggy (611105)

                  ...and you won't gore yourself when attempting to replace user-serviceable parts...

                  Although, having done Apple repairs for a while, I can tell you that parts considered non-user serviceable (which used to include the hard drive in iMacs, don't know if it still does) are often hidden behind a matrix of bear traps and razor blades.

        • by adisakp (705706)
          “Make the impossible possible, the possible easy, and the easy elegant.”

          Feldenkrais was talking about physical movement but Apple applies it to their UI, products, and marketing.
      • What's interesting is that it seems Apple's product announcements are the only remaining tech that gets everyone talking, whether pro or against, people do talk about it. Dell might have released half a dozen new systems last week, but who'd know? I was in a tmobile store the other day and saw a number of Android-based handsets that I hadn't heard of. And even though I consider myself a geek, I have very little idea what the Xoom is, other than a Motorola tablet, and more to the point, why should I care?

        I'm not saying that we should care about Apple product announcements, but Apple seems to be the only ones who can generate any significant buzz about whatever it is they're announcing.

        Slashdot, as well as many other ad-supported tech news sites, make money from fanboyism. The people who truely dislike Apple news and products aren't doing themselves any favors by bitchbitchbitching.

      • Re:hmm (Score:5, Insightful)

        by JustinOpinion (1246824) on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @02:36PM (#35292216)

        I'm not saying that we should care about Apple product announcements, but Apple seems to be the only ones who can generate any significant buzz about whatever it is they're announcing.

        The hype can get out of hand, but I think Apple more or less earns this exposure. The reason is Apple is one of the only companies that really puts effort into design.

        Now, I say this despite not being much of a consumer of Apple products. My desktops (work and home) run Linux, though my laptop is a (4-year-old) Macbook Pro. But even though I have many reasons I don't like Apple products (lockin, etc.), I recognize the serious effort and skill they put into designing not just a product, but a successful user experience.

        One of the reasons journalists and bloggers and design professionals and design enthusiasts all watch Apple closely is that they are one of the only companies that actually carries a design through to its full conclusion. Other manufacturers can, and do, come up with innovative ideas and the beginnings of a good design, but they all ultimately compromise on that design (usually for money). Think of something as simple as putting all those "Optimized for Windows" and "Intel inside" stickers on a laptop: I suspect those were not there in the original artist renderings; they are a corruption of the design. The crapware that is loaded is another corruption. Trying to get the price down to competitive levels requires all kinds of compromises in terms of build details, quality, etc. Edges don't meet quite flush because of some engineering or price constraint (not because it makes the device more pleasing to the user). UI elements are not very responsive because it would have taken too long to optimize that code. They don't worry about there being a subtle (but satisfying) 'click' when plugging-in a cable. And so on. (Note that I'm using "design" as shorthand for "design of the user experience"... obviously these companies have successfully engineered/designed products for a certain constraint-set.)

        Apple makes its fair share of gaffes, and it's not obvious that all of their design choices are worth the premium costs. (Again, I mostly don't buy their stuff.) But as far as test cases to ponder, their products are the best around. One can really evaluate the pros and cons of a touch interface now that Apple put serious effort into designing a UI that is touch-centric (previously most touch interfaces were either crappy overlays on top of mousing UI (e.g. Windows tablets) or just terrible to begin win (e.g. a kiosk touch-UI)...).

        So, in short, by having a focused vision and seeing it through to the end, they create products that are not ugly mixtures of compromises (where when things don't work you're left wondering if it's because it was a bad idea or poorly executed); their products are consistent and cohesive (so that you can evaluate a given design choice, and copy/improve/ignore it as needed in designing other products). Even if you don't like (and don't buy) their stuff, it's worth watching what they produce.

        • by dch24 (904899)
          If this refresh of the Macbook Pro does not include a quad-core processor as an option, I won't buy it.

          - Looking for a laptop
          • by Matey-O (518004)

            Who you kiddin? Anybody making that kinda comment wasn't going to buy Apple anyway and you know it.

        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by Sepultura (150245)

          Apple makes its fair share of gaffes, and it's not obvious that all of their design choices are worth the premium costs.

          While I agree with much of what you say I have to ask: What "premium costs"?

          Why are we still hearing this even though it's been shown for YEARS now to be a fallacy - ie. other manufacturers aren't significantly less expensive when comparing similarly spec'd hardware, and often have horrid designs to boot?

          • Well, judging by what other manufacturers are promising to maybe think about possibly shipping one day real soon now, the iPad premium is roughly -$100 to -$150.
        • by Belial6 (794905)
          You are describing a mythical Apple that doesn't exist. I had never noticed "there being a subtle (but satisfying) 'click' when plugging-in a cable". So, I inspected the Mac Mini sitting on my desk. Nope. No click when I plug in the cables. Not even a little bit. The edges where the parts meet up also have gaps. They didn't even bother to put the power button on the front of the machine. All in all, it is a moderately attractive box. Nothing special, but moderately attractive, and a usability disas
      • by mosb1000 (710161) <mosb1000@mac.com> on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @02:52PM (#35292428)

        When Apple talks, it actually means something, unlike the empty promises made my other technology companies.

        It's because Apple doesn't announce products months or years before they are released. They only announce them when they are sure they'll have a product to ship. All you hear from other companies is hyped up initial announcements followed by delays and retracted features. From Apple you hear about new products that will actually ship as promised. It's not because Apple is better at shipping quality products on schedule (though they are). It's because they don't go on blabbing about every new technology they have in the works years before a working prototype has even seen the light of day.

      • by cyfer2000 (548592)
        Xoom?
      • by ukyoCE (106879)

        Absolutely right.

        One of the reasons is probably their comparatively sparse product lineup. I was looking at Sony Vaio laptops, recently, and they have a 10", 11", 12"... everything up to 17" laptops. Apple has 3, 13", 15", and 17". There are a hundred android handsets with every imaginable combination of hardware, but there only 2 iphones, the gsm and cdma ones. When apple changes their product lineup people know what product they're talking about even if they don't own one. It's not "the 12" version o

      • by Draek (916851)

        Not really. Remember the launch of Windows 7? tech event of the decade as far as I'm concerned, and those of the X360 or even the Kinect weren't so insignificant either.

        The reason Apple launches are news is the same reason Microsoft or Google product launches are news: they're an insanely big corporation with more devoted followers than most companies have plain old customers.

        Now, you could argue that other large corporations like IBM don't get that kind of media frenzy, but I'd say it's mostly due to their

      • by vlm (69642)

        I was in a tmobile store the other day and saw a number of Android-based handsets .... Apple seems to be the only ones who can generate any significant buzz about whatever it is they're announcing.

        Other products sit on the shelves, people actually buy apple products. Thats why they're important. Quantity has a quality all its own.

    • >>>leaks seem to work.

      The slashvertisements sure work.

      (hugs Apple G5) No I'm not upgrading yet! It still works! (pause) What do you mean the latest iTunes and safari require an Intel Mac? Oh crap.

      • by NekSnappa (803141)
        As unfortunate as it may be. The reason I finally put my G4 luxo lamp iMac out to pasture was the requirements for the iPad.
      • The slashvertisements sure work.

        Yeah, Apple'll make big bucks when the iPad 2 without the retina display goes on sale.

  • by MyCookie (1983480) on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @02:01PM (#35291866)
    ...and it's features to the non-Pro. I'm not going to pay for a 13" with a 1200x800 screen when it costs me any more than $1000. This one doesn't even have switchable graphics.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by AdrianKemp (1988748)

      You might not, but I an 7 other people I know did. Some of us like laptops that actually fit in your lap but still have good specs.

      You're right though, apple should drop the model because you don't personally want to buy it.

      • Why did you buy the 13" MBP instead of the 13" MB? His point is that the specs are almost the same, but the MBP costs significantly more.
        • The pro weighs less
          The pro is smaller but has the same screen size and keyboard
          The black border around the screen makes it look much better, and at night doesn't distract you from the actual screen.
          The pro has an SD slot and firewire (though I don't care about the firewire)
          The pro has a backlit keyboard (very important)
          The pro can take a better chip, and more memory (important, since I need the 8GB of ram for my 2 virtual machines)
          The pro has better sounding speakers (they may well be the same, it may just

        • Huh? Base 13-in MBP is only $200 more, comes with 4G instead of 2G and SD reader, slightly smaller and weighs a few g less.

          If you bring MB up to 4G, only $100 difference.

  • Oy (Score:4, Insightful)

    by tool462 (677306) on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @02:07PM (#35291914)

    Can we stop calling them leaks and start calling them press releases? Nobody is fooled by this anymore.

    • Can we stop calling them leaks and start calling them press releases? Nobody is fooled by this anymore.

      If Gizmodo is willing to pay several grand for a stolen phone, I don't think we can safely assume it's just marketing.

  • Of course I read earlier today that there were rumors that it was being pushed back a month or two. Everyone likes rumors because they seem illicit. You weren't supposed to know that! Much sexier than an official announcement of some kind.
  • No USB 3? (Score:4, Funny)

    by Tumbleweed (3706) * on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @02:11PM (#35291970)

    "Fuck them. Fuck them up their stupid asses."
    - Steve Jobs (may have been Jason Mewes)

    • It's got Light Peak on it (or Thunderbolt) so that's mostly irrelevant. eSATA, USB3, Firewire 1600 or whatever can all be hooked up through Thunderbolt which is really what makes this release interesting.

      • by Tumbleweed (3706) *

        It's got Light Peak on it (or Thunderbolt) so that's mostly irrelevant. eSATA, USB3, Firewire 1600 or whatever can all be hooked up through Thunderbolt which is really what makes this release interesting.

        Where is this info about Light Peak being able to do eSATA or USB 3 or Firewire coming from?

  • Light Peak looks like it will be called Thunderbolt.

    If that seriously is the final name for Light Peak, then I don't quite agree with their decision. What exactly does it have to do with thunder or bolts? "Thunderbolt port" sounds more like innuendo than an actual port you'd use, as opposed to "Light Peak port". At least "Light Peak" gave me a vague idea of how the tech works by the name alone, whereas Thunderbolt just sounds completely unrelated to the technology.

    I swear, marketing comes up with the worst names for everything these days. "Xfinity" et al.

    • ...and now I just read the article and it seems that "Thunderbolt" is just a variant of Light Peak. Not the "final name", hopefully.

    • by JPRelph (519032)

      ...At least "Light Peak" gave me a vague idea of how the tech works by the name alone, whereas Thunderbolt just sounds completely unrelated to the technology.

      It's worth bearing in mind that the version of Light Peak that we're likely to see tomorrow, is probably going to be copper-based rather than optical, so Light Peak would probably be just as unrelated as Thunderbolt

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      I'd agree, but I'm trying to find the extinguisher. The firewire port on my MacBook is acting up again.

    • by mini me (132455)

      Thunderbolt is apparently a copper interconnect, as opposed to Fibre, which the name Light Peak seems to imply. For that reason, I feel they made the right decision not making reference to light and the ties between thunderbolts and lightning does make some sense in this case.

    • by hawk (1151)

      >What exactly does it have to do with thunder or bolts?

      It's as new convenient way to zap your ram. :)

      hawk

  • by pandrijeczko (588093) on Wednesday February 23, 2011 @02:57PM (#35292486)

    ...but if you're a sandaled Free Software Foundation pornmonger who likes passing non-masturbatory time playing retrogame ROMs on emulators, then move along please. Nothing to see here!

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