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Intel Portables (Apple) Apple

Apple To Unveil Light Peak, New MacBook Pros This Week? 311

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the because-they-can dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Apple will reportedly soon make an announcement regarding a new high-speed connection technology. And as luck would have it, this comes hot on the heels of a report that Apple will release a slew of new MacBook Pros later this week. For some time now, reports have abounded detailing Apple and Intel's cooperation on a new transfer technology dubbed Light Peak capable of transferring data at 10GB/s both up and down. Could this find its way into Apple's new lineup of MacBook Pros as has been previously rumored?"
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Apple To Unveil Light Peak, New MacBook Pros This Week?

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  • by jacks smirking reven (909048) on Monday February 21, 2011 @12:06PM (#35268390)
    From what I've read it's not fast enough to replace HDMI/Displayport and not as cheap to integrate as USB 3.0 (will Apple retain a royalty on the connector ala Firewire?) I do understand the need to have a universal, optical interconnect but I'm not so sure i want Apple being the one pushing it...
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      No they won't get royalties. It's Intel's baby, not theirs.

    • by JesseDegenerate (936699) on Monday February 21, 2011 @12:16PM (#35268516)
      First, it's intel's tech, not apples. Second, apple's pushed alot of good tech forward, maybe it's just that i'm not a bigot, but who cares who's pushing it? Would you rather sony push it and rename it ilink2? I'm sure you wouldn't have a problem with Google pushing it? which makes your post, infuriating to me. Any company that brings it, even in a proprietary form will spur on innovation. I didn't hear anything about DLNA until Apple started pushing airplay. The rise of android can be easily traced to apple's iphone, and a very worried verizon wireless. it's good for us all, ffs.
      • by Nursie (632944)

        When was that?

        'cos the rest of us got interested back when the ps3 was released and used it for media streaming.

    • by jo_ham (604554)

      No royalties to Apple - it's Intel's.

      As far as royalties on the firewire connector, it's $0.25 per device (regardless of ports) and the money is split between several companies, including Apple. I suppose Intel and Apple could do something similar here, but given the way Apple took mini-Displayport (it's royalty free), I think they learned their lesson on port royalties. No idea what Intel will do though.

    • I do understand the need to have a universal, optical interconnect

      Just keep in mind that the first generation of Light Peak isn't optical, it's copper [computerworld.com].

    • I would take any Apple rumors with a grain of salt until Apple announces. From what I've read, some of these rumor site reporting that Light Peak will be used in the iPad 2 which makes even less sense than a MacBook Pro. Some of these site are merely speculating on some one's speculation and have no inherent understanding of the technology. So I would be skeptical.
    • So Intel's idea (Light Peak is Intel's technology, not Apple's) is for Light Peak to become a universal connector replacement. USB, DVI/HDMI, even SATA. One connector that you can use for everything. Make things simpler and hopefully cheaper in the long run.

      Now at the present time it isn't fast enough for all of that. It runs at 10gbps right now. Not suitable for a SATA replacement. However Intel believes they'll be able to scale it to 100gbps in time, which would work.

      In terms of display it is enough in mo

  • by necro81 (917438) on Monday February 21, 2011 @12:09PM (#35268436) Journal
    The new connection tech is called Light Peak. The summary has it right; the title has it wrong.
    • Actually, the headline is correct. Apple is going to unveil a new light speed this week. It turns out that the reality distortion field allows light to travel up to 100 times faster. There will also be an announcement of a partnership with Virgin Galactic.
      • by rubycodez (864176)
        that's good they're upping the light speed, I'm tired of flipping the switch in the bathroom and having time to squat down on the john before the light from my old CFL bulbs illuminates the room.
  • by Andy Dodd (701) <atd7@corne[ ]edu ['ll.' in gap]> on Monday February 21, 2011 @12:11PM (#35268452) Homepage

    The article makes claims that Intel "Is delaying" USB 3.0 "until 2010" to help Light Peak get off the ground.

    Problem 1: It's 2011. You can't be "delaying something until 2010" in 2011...
    Problem 2: USB 3.0 is deployed already. So they clearly can't be delaying it.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Problem 2: USB 3.0 is deployed already. So they clearly can't be delaying it.

      Intel has yet to release a USB 3.0 chipset themselves - other companies have released them, which is why there are products on the market, but Intel hasn't. That's why you see it on such few computers at this point - it isn't incredibly high end, but Intel is withholding because they want to give LightPeak a fighting chance. (At least that's the theory) Once Intel comes out with a USB 3.0 chipset, it will be much more prevalent.

    • Before the Sandy Bridge bug forced a recall, Intel SB boards shipped with USB 3 ports on them.

      Now what they may be talking about is that USB 3 isn't part of the current Intel chipsets, you have to add a chip on the board to get it. Ok well that is a different issue, and has nothing to do with trying to hold it back and everything to do with design and implementation time.

      Please remember USB is Intel's spec. If they wanted to "hold USB 3 back" or something they could just not release it. They just aren't int

      • by makomk (752139)

        Please remember USB is Intel's spec. If they wanted to "hold USB 3 back" or something they could just not release it.

        They tried doing that too. In fact, I'm not sure if the spec for USB host controllers has officially been released even now, though the other OEMs did try and strong-arm Intel into releasing it.

  • just what we need $30+ adapters and maybe powered hubs. One cable for E-net, Video, sound, and mouse / keyboard? so you need a hub or
    daisy chaining.

    also HOW will light-peak tie in to ATI and NVIDIA video? On a desktop will we see a voodoo 2 like loop back cable?

    apple better keep the E-NET ports as lightpeak to E-NET cables are point less and just have much higher costs.

    keyboard and mouse will stay USB as they don't need high speed cables.

    • From what I understand (i.e. what i read the last time this technology was discussed on Slashdot), what makes Lightpeak so interesting is that you can run basically anything else over it. I'm running mad looking for an HDMI-to-RCA downscaler - my laptop has HDMI and DVI outputs, but my church's $12,000 switching/scaling system only does composite. Since replacing literally every piece of gear in the chain would be required to plug in an HDMI natively and the church isn't looking to spend around $100,000 for

      • by Junta (36770)

        The idea is to encapsulate a number of digital protocols (nothing unique to Light Peak, Displayport in theory supports ethernet and usb packets in addition to audio and video data, for example.

        You will need something to convert it to analog, and that will remain a niche market with high prices as a result. You won't get a magical RCA out from this.

        I also doubt you can't replace the display portion of your churches setup with something that would accept both displayport *and* RCA in (not requiring replacing

      • by MoonBuggy (611105)

        I'm running mad looking for an HDMI-to-RCA downscaler - my laptop has HDMI and DVI outputs, but my church's $12,000 switching/scaling system only does composite.

        If your laptop has DVI-I rather than DVI-D (and I've never seen one with only DVI-D), it's already capable of outputting analog component RGB, but not composite. If your input equipment only takes composite, converters go for about $100 [hdtvsupply.com].

        • by MoonBuggy (611105)

          I'm an idiot - converters I linked work in the wrong direction. What you need is $150 from the same site [hdtvsupply.com] or $50 from eBay [ebay.com] (the two devices look identical, except for the price - whether they are or not it anybody's guess).

      • by vux984 (928602)

        I'm running mad looking for an HDMI-to-RCA downscaler

        http://www.svideo.com/hdmi2svideo.html [svideo.com]

      • I'm curious, what's the difference between this [dinodirect.com] and this [atlona.com]? I haven't had to convert HDMI or DVI to RCA before so I'm wondering why the first link is ~$13 and the second is ~$300
    • by jimicus (737525)

      If it's a choice between:

        - A £20 adaptor on your desk and the cheapest laptop we could find OR
        - A £150 docking station and an expensive laptop that supports docking stations

      Guess what you'll be getting.

      • Theres a third choice-- USB 2.0 docking stations.

        Have fun getting them to not flip out every 2 weeks and break your scanner, video, etc, though.

    • by jo_ham (604554)

      Apple won't be dropping ethernet just because light peak can also carry ethernet data. They didn't drop it when they introduced firewire (which also does IP networking if you want it to), did they?

      This (and this is a rumour article, and in no way constitutes a press release from Apple, but assuming that light peak on MPBs is what will happen) is just the new high speed external I/O. USB keyboards will still be USB, Bluetooth keyboards will still be Bluetooth, ethernet cables will still be RJ-45.

      It could mak

  • Mind your B's (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    10G[B]/s or 10G[b]/s? Wikipedia says 10Gb/s.

    • But does that mean gibibits or gigabits?
    • by jandrese (485)
      Since it is a communication tech, almost certainly 10Gb/s. 10GB/s would be right at the edge of what a full power modern PC can keep up with (assuming you're not doing anything with the data). Dedicated bit blasters like video cards can run faster but even super high resolution 3D displays though (WQXGA at 120hz with 32bit color would be pushing 15Gb/s. The point is, nothing on the consumer level is even close to 80Gb/s (10GB/s), so it would be gross overkill and very expensive on modern machines.
  • by dclozier (1002772) on Monday February 21, 2011 @12:24PM (#35268590)
    Microsoft has announced Ludicrous Speed!
  • It can go right along side the PC Express card slot and other worthless port technologies pock marking notebooks.
  • by 1u3hr (530656) on Monday February 21, 2011 @01:49PM (#35269482)
    I'm pretty tired of Slashdot allowing any twat to plagiarise a story, (in this case from CNET at http://news.cnet.com/8301-13924_3-20033940-64.html [cnet.com] )and screw up a few facts (eg, they confuse Gigabits with Gigabytes; only out by a factor of 8), submit it "anonymously" and then drive traffic to their crummy site.
    • CNet appears to have snarfed this from AppleInsider.com, and augmented by reading the Intel web site on LightPeak. I'm normally inclined to agree with your complaint, but in this case it's not clear that you've traced the story back to it's origination.
      • by 1u3hr (530656)

        but in this case it's not clear that you've traced the story back to it's origination.

        It's is clear though that the blog cited by the submitter and endorsed by Slashdot isn't it.

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