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iPhone Tops Windows Mobile Share; MS Releases iPhone App 269

Posted by kdawson
from the late-to-the-party-but-getting-ahead dept.
walterbyrd notes that new data from Gartner indicates that the successful launch of the iPhone 3G was enough to push iPhone market share over that of Windows Mobile devices — the entire range of them. And reader Spy Hunter writes: "Seadragon Mobile is Microsoft's first iPhone application. Seadragon is a technology for streaming zoomable user interfaces, and this iPhone incarnation allows viewing huge collections of gigapixel-sized images over WiFi or 3G. If you don't have an iPhone, you can also try Seadragon in your browser via Seadragon Ajax."
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iPhone Tops Windows Mobile Share; MS Releases iPhone App

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  • Innovation pays (Score:5, Interesting)

    by alain94040 (785132) * on Monday December 15, 2008 @07:55PM (#26126729) Homepage

    When Apple launched the iPhone two years ago, they announced that their goal was to ship 10 million iPhones by year end. Frankly, no one had any clue how many or how few would sell. It was just a guess on the part of Apple management (really!).

    And somehow, they hit the number and blew past Microsoft smartphones, Nokia and blackberry. For once innovation pays, I love it. In he last 5 years I was involved as an engineer with some of the companies designing cell phones. Ground-breaking innovation is not in their DNA. Instead, they take last year's technology and make it 20% better and faster. Middle management has no clue how to foster innovation.

    You need those companies around because they drive down cost and make technology accessible. But you also need a few Apples that forego incremental improvements and shoot for the moon.

    --
    French iPhone Apps review site applicationiphone.com [applicationiphone.com] looking for contributors

    • Re:Innovation pays (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Midnight Thunder (17205) on Monday December 15, 2008 @08:07PM (#26126869) Homepage Journal

      Yup, it really is amazing. I don't think anyone could have guessed it would have done so well.

      I wonder how much this says something about the iPhone and how much this says of the competition. Of the competition, the way I see them:
        - For me Windows mobile suffers from the fact it feel like a desktop OS shoe horned into a mobile device.
        - Palm lost focus and the separation of hardware into two separate companies that caused more problems than it solved. Then there was the fact they decided to go with Windows mobile.
        - RIM is still the better contender, but maybe purely focusing on a business solution limits the potential size of the market.
        - Android suffers from the fact they don't control the hardware, so the quality of the experience depends as much on the device manufacturers as the work Google does.

      • Re:Innovation pays (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Cyberax (705495) on Monday December 15, 2008 @08:24PM (#26127017)

        Android has good chances, but it has arrived a bit late. For most practical purposes it STILL has not arrived (G1 device is too 'niche').

        • Huh. Who cares about MS creating an iPhone app. I'm more interested in that Visa Mobile ad just above this post (mobile/micro payements)

          And it's only available on the G1!

        • Re:Innovation pays (Score:5, Interesting)

          by initialE (758110) on Tuesday December 16, 2008 @12:38AM (#26129037)

          Well the iPhone didn't stand a chance against Windows Mobile, because there were apps and apps for WM. There were apps for every kind of conceivable thing you could put on a mobile device. It was like... windows... You know you don't want it, you just don't have a choice because you needed your apps supported. Never mind it crashes all the time. Never mind you might miss important calls and never know it. It had app support.
          Then what happened? Apple releases an SDK that enables rapid app development. They produce a storefront that enables you to hang out your hat almost immediately. They even provide back-end infrastructure for apps that need to do background communication. Once again, they are a major contender. And in record time.
          My question is this: Do you see this happening for Android?

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Ash-Fox (726320)

        I don't think anyone could have guessed it would have done so well.

        What? Beat one of the most niche market shares (Windows mobile) in the mobile phone market?

        I could of guessed that, it's got a Apple logo.

        • Re:Innovation pays (Score:4, Insightful)

          by mdwh2 (535323) on Tuesday December 16, 2008 @09:56AM (#26131833) Journal

          What? Beat one of the most niche market shares (Windows mobile) in the mobile phone market?

          I agree. I'm not sure why you got modded down - this statement is to the point of the matter. The other day, there was an article where people were saying how great the Iphone because it had sold more than the only just released Android. I don't know if it's true that the Iphone is more popular than Windows Mobile - if it is, then that's bad for Windows mobile, but comments on this story are as if people think that these are the only two phones that exist!

          Wake me up when they're competing with the likes of Motorola and Nokia - why don't we ever get stories about them?

          (Trying to claim that the Iphone is a "smart" phone, and then restrict the market they are looking at, doesn't really help - most phones these days can do the things that were once the domain of smartphones; other new phones by major manufacturers such as Nokia have just as much right to claim the "smartphone" label as the Iphone does.)

      • Re:Innovation pays (Score:5, Insightful)

        by SoupIsGoodFood_42 (521389) on Monday December 15, 2008 @09:45PM (#26127747)

        Yup, it really is amazing. I don't think anyone could have guessed it would have done so well.

        Some of use knew right from the moment we saw the demo that it would become incredibly popular. Of course, many of us also get ignored when we start ranting about how important usability is and how there is more to design than aesthetics.

      • Android suffers from the fact they don't control the hardware, so the quality of the experience depends as much on the device manufacturers as the work Google does.

        Totally. The Android phone T-Mobile is selling is kinda under-specced. One of my bosses at a MS-centric organization got one (because it's cooler than the Windows Mobile phones he had before, which he never talked smack about until he got the Android... and yet, very importantly for him, it is not from Apple, who he hates for reasons I don't know). MS-centric organizations of course have Exchange servers, and his Android can't do jack with ours (except Outlook Web Access, maybe)... funny, those of us who

      • Re:Innovation pays (Score:5, Insightful)

        by HonkyLips (654494) on Tuesday December 16, 2008 @06:36AM (#26130769)

        I always felt like most of the hype around the iPhone's launch missed the point. The hype was deserved, but everyone was hyping the wrong part.
        What I saw was Apple not launching a cell-phone, they were launching a new mobile computing platform that could also be used as a cell-phone. It's a fundamental paradigm shift. Even now when I read rumours of Apple launching a netbook I think to myself that they've already done it- the iPhone. Back then journalists scoffed at the price and laughed at suggestions that Apple might worry giants like Nokia but they simply didn't get it. The iPhone isn't simply a phone, it's the first of the next-generation in mobile computing.
        Comparing Apple's market share to Nokia's or other established phone manufacturers misses the point, because they are simply making phones. Even RIM just makes phones - call them smart phones if you prefer, but the basic way in which RIM have approached the Blackberry is the same as the way Nokia approaches the design of their phones. They do different things in different ways, but they are, first and foremost, phones. The parent poster is spot on when he refers to a new phone simply being the old phone but 20% faster etc etc etc. It's like car manufacturing, where many of today's cars are just the result of decades of incremental improvements on an old and outdated design.
        In some ways the iPhone is a technical trojan horse but with a sophistication beyond Sony using the PS3 to get BluRay players into living rooms. The iPhone is getting real mobile computers into people's hands, with the 'real' internet (ignoring the Flash issue), and a real operating system. If people think it's just a phone that can play games, or a combination of a phone and an iPod then fine- Apple have done their job. They've made a mobile computer that is so easy to use people take it for granted...
        I always thought that the iPhone deserved every bit of hype it received when it was launched, but not for the glossy interface or slick design. It was taking on industry giants such as Nokia and instantly making their corporate model obsolete, and offering instead a new paradigm in regards to mobile personal computers.

        • This is exactly what I saw. It's putting OS X on a phone, but in a way that doesn't feel like you are using a desktop OS. That's why I sprang for the iTouch. With the WiFi I essentially have a "netbook" in my hands!
          Not to mention a development platform that shares a great deal of functionality with the iPhone.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by digitalchinky (650880)

      Apple fanboy? Dude, at least read the summary. Nokia are still leaps and bounds ahead of Apple. It's doubtful they'll lose that spot anywhere in the next few years. If you were 'really' involved with any cell phone company, particularly as an engineer, you'd know that almost every hardware function of either of the two iPhone models thus far has been a knock off of stuff Nokia (and many others) have been doing for several years already. So it has a cute little finger sensitive display, this is not new eithe

      • Re:Innovation pays (Score:5, Insightful)

        by dogmatixpsych (786818) on Monday December 15, 2008 @09:11PM (#26127437) Homepage Journal
        There are two types of creativity (innovation) - thinking up things no one has done before and taking what a bunch of people have done before and putting it all together. Apple does some of the first but mostly does the second type. They not only put it all together, they do so in an attractive package that usually works well.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by boredhacker (1103107)

      somehow, they hit the number and blew past Microsoft smartphones, Nokia and blackberry

      I would *love* to see something that backs up this assertion.

      Last I checked, Nokia has way more overall market share AS WELL more 'smartphone' market share.

    • What's so innovative about the iphone? Not trolling, I really am curious what is so innovative about it.

      • by Lars T. (470328)
        Well, there is one (physical!) button to put it in "quiet" ring-mode - judging from many rings where there shouldn't be any, that must be a real tough one on other phones.
      • Re:Innovation pays (Score:5, Insightful)

        by LibertineR (591918) on Monday December 15, 2008 @09:35PM (#26127643)
        Well, I am no Apple Fan-boy, but I'll say this about the iPhone.

        I have never come across a device that allows me to use it how I LIVE, more than the iPhone does. Most every device forces you to adapt to how it works, make changes to how you like to do things in order to get productive use out of the device. The iPhone just seems to fit like a glove to how I like to do things with a smartphone.

        I dont have to compromise, I just use it, it works, especially the GPS feature.

      • by cgenman (325138)

        The iPhone was the first phone I haven't wanted to throw out the window immediately. A touch screen interface to a phone works much more intuitively than a pen or small trackball, and the multi-touch allows you to really maneuver around oversized data without too much hassle. The e-mail / phone / internet / ipod integration is simple and straightforward. And how phones had gotten by without Google maps prior to the iPhone is befuddling.

        Really, what makes the iPhone good is how all of the steps of the pro

      • Re:Innovation pays (Score:4, Insightful)

        by MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) on Tuesday December 16, 2008 @12:03AM (#26128819)

        What's so innovative about the iphone? Not trolling, I really am curious what is so innovative about it.

        They made it work like a phone with web functionality, as opposed to making it work like a PDA with cell phone functionality.

        It's difficult to explain until you've sat down and used it. It's not about feature comparisons, it's more like comparing a regular coffee cup to one of those fancy thermal mugs that have a thicker handle, a lid, and a flap to close it. They both do the same job but the latter was a little more thought out for a coffee drinker. (It's also more expensive and lots of people find ways to make due without it.)

    • When Apple launched the iPhone two years ago, they announced that their goal was to ship 10 million iPhones by year end. Frankly, no one had any clue how many or how few would sell. It was just a guess on the part of Apple management (really!). And somehow, they hit the number and blew past Microsoft smartphones, Nokia and blackberry.

      Pardon? They did what? From TFA:

      Nokia, meanwhile, maintained its number 1 spot with 42.4% in market share. iPhone market share jumped up to 12.9% during the third quarter of 2

    • The article linked in the summary is misleading and borderline outright false.

      The suggestion in the summary, that the iPhone now has a bigger marketshare than the full range of Windows mobile devices is wrong. For starters, the stats available are only relevant to Windows mobile phones- this does not include say Windows mobile PDAs without phone features so to suggest the iPhone has outsold all Windows mobile devices simply isn't true.

      More importantly though is the suggestion that the iPhone has a bigger ma

  • congratulations (Score:5, Insightful)

    by larry bagina (561269) on Monday December 15, 2008 @08:00PM (#26126805) Journal

    You can complain about cut and paste or how the iphone is locked down or too expensive or doesn't run linux, but it's been a real donkey punch to the industry, and even rival companies acknowledge (and applaud) it for raising the bar (at least in the US).

    • Re:congratulations (Score:5, Informative)

      by Anthony_Cargile (1336739) on Monday December 15, 2008 @08:10PM (#26126893) Homepage
      Well they ported some portions of Linux [insanelymac.com](sorry fanboys) to the iPhone, apparently enough to at least boot it and use it without sound, touch, wireless or any other major iPhone pluses.

      And as far as it being a 'real donkey punch' to the industry, MS actually writing an app for it pretty much confirms this, although they have also written ads in Flash despite marketing Silverlight :p.
    • Re:congratulations (Score:5, Insightful)

      by roc97007 (608802) on Monday December 15, 2008 @08:54PM (#26127311) Journal

      > You can complain about cut and paste or how the iphone is locked down or too expensive or doesn't run linux, but it's been a real donkey punch to the industry, and even rival companies acknowledge (and applaud) it for raising the bar (at least in the US).

      Yes, I can, (except, who cares if it runs linux?) and also complain about 3G/Edge issues, dropped calls, and lack of MMS and flash and java. But despite all that it demonstrably kicks Windows Mobile's butt. (In fairness, from a technical standpoint, it was an easy butt to kick.)

      The biggest lesson the industry needs to take from this is: People use Windows Mobile devices because they have to. People use i-Phones because they want to.

      Microsoft promotes the "have to" mentality by selling interoperability and similar look-and-feel with Winders and Winders-related services. As more and more people (and corporations) realize that the Start button is not a good paradigm for a phone, and sufficient interoperability can be achieved without having to put up with the Windows Mobile code base, Windows Mobile will diminish to an also-ran and, like Disco, we'll all look back and wonder what madness made us think we liked it.

      However, these other issues still need to be fixed. Here's hoping that Apple isn't so arrogant to believe that they can innovate *once* and retain the market. Nokia and RIM now have offerings that are similar in concept, without the drawbacks. Apple set the bar -- now they need to show us how to rise above it. Merely increasing the memory in the next model will not be good enough.

      Personally, I'm still clinging to my old beat-up Palm-based phone whilst I see how Apple fixes the problems enumerated here in the next release. Or if someone catches up to them in the meantime.

      For example, my daughter is a rabid user of MMS with her Blackberry Curve. On an i-phone, I'd not be able to receive her messages. That is not acceptable. Having a cool interface is not an acceptable substitute. Apple, give us the features we really want, instead of the features you think we should be using, and there will be no stopping you.

      • by gutter (27465)

        However, these other issues still need to be fixed. Here's hoping that Apple isn't so arrogant to believe that they can innovate *once* and retain the market. Nokia and RIM now have offerings that are similar in concept, without the drawbacks. Apple set the bar -- now they need to show us how to rise above it. Merely increasing the memory in the next model will not be good enough.

        Judging from their actions with the iPod, I don't think you'll have to worry about them standing still. For all the talk about about people catching up to the iPod, Apple generally improved it faster than the competitors caught up, improving capacity, form factor, and interface at an impressive pace while keeping prices flat or decreasing them.

        Considering that they did the same thing from the first iPhone to the second, I think it's unlikely they're going to stand still and wait for the industry to catch u

      • by kklein (900361)

        Just as an n-size of one, I'd like to say I've had no connection problems at all here in Japan on SoftBank's 3G network. None at all. I really suspect that its an infrastructure problem in other countries. Japan's had 3G the longest of anyone, and I live in the Tokyo area.

        The lack of copy/paste is the only thing that has irked me.

      • by KanSer (558891)

        Sorry to be a prick but why doesn't your daughter just e-mail you instead? I'd rather e-mail than MMS, but I'm not much of an MMS'er so I'm mostly clueless.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by roc97007 (608802)

          > Sorry to be a prick but why doesn't your daughter just e-mail you instead? I'd rather e-mail than MMS, but I'm not much of an MMS'er so I'm mostly clueless.

          I don't think you're being a prick. She uses MMS because that's what all her friends use. There doesn't need to be any other reason. That's the point, really. It's not up to Apple to change in what way we communicate with each other. They can provide a different, more positive experience, and have. But that doesn't give them the right to di

  • Interesting (Score:2, Informative)

    by boyter (964910)
    The most interesting thing is that Seadragon must use Javascript or something similar but not Silverlight for the deep zoom it provides.... I just came out of a Silverlight presentation and deepzoom was hailed as its party piece... hmmm
    • by ceoyoyo (59147)

      Why must it use Javascript?

      Seadragon on the iPhone is a native app. I suppose they could have made it work through one of the existing web-oriented interfaces, but they certainly didn't have to.

  • According to several reports, Microsoft released a broken app called Seadragon. [yahoo.com] Apparently Microsoft achieved its expected quality goal.
    • it's a technology! So says their website!

      Microsoft seems to be less about programmers and more about wordsmiths. Technology instead of application, innovation instead of stealing an idea...

    • by KanSer (558891)

      I just downloaded the app. Photosynth works perfectly fine.

      You quoted one source, not multiple. Did you try it for yourself?

  • Hmm... (Score:5, Informative)

    by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Monday December 15, 2008 @08:07PM (#26126871) Journal
    Remember, remember. [youtube.com]

    Now, the iPhone isn't my cup of tea at all; but I believe the term is "p0wn3d."
  • by hattig (47930) on Monday December 15, 2008 @08:14PM (#26126935) Journal

    Is it surprising?

    WinCE was originally developed as a PalmOS competitor/beater, running on fat Psion 5 look-a-likes with dire keyboards, snail-like interfaces and the stability of Mount Etna.

    Since that time the platform has remained the same. The browser is still ancient, and their best promises for the next version are "IE 6" quality, i.e., irrelevant. Sure, there are new interfaces, the software is a little more up to date, the kernel has been switched to a more modern variant, it does wireless, bluetooth, 3G, etc, but it's still the same at heart. Rubbish.

    Microsoft - you could sell iPhone Office for $99 and make a mint. Or you could sell licenses to WinMob+Pocket Office to manufacturers for cents. Microsoft have always said they'll develop where the market is. If the iPhone and iPod Touch ecosystem continues to grow, surely it is but a matter of time before they develop iPhone viewers, and then editors, for their file formats - before the formats become irrelevant... Pocket Project for iPhone would result in many a fevered brow in managers' offices around the world.

  • by mevets (322601) on Monday December 15, 2008 @08:16PM (#26126955)

    can we expect an onslaught of viruses? It is much easier to attack a single platform, if I understand the virus marketing info properly.

    • can we expect an onslaught of viruses? It is much easier to attack a single platform, if I understand the virus marketing info properly.
      No, that is the reason Apple won't let you run an iTunes competitor. If I understand the Apple marketing properly...
    • by cgenman (325138)

      We've never had a properly secured platform as a monolithic target. It will be interesting to see whether or not the iPhone can prove or disprove the old addage that the #1 platform will inherently be virus prone, or if that was just excusing poor programming.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by ceoyoyo (59147)

        Sure we have. Apache has approached 70% of all webservers at various times. It seems to have fewer in-the-wild exploits than the underdog IIS.

  • Mr. Sid part deux? (Score:2, Informative)

    by Foldarn (1152051)
    That Seadragon stuff is old. When I was in the Marines, it was a technology called Mr. Sid. It was pyramid-based layers of an image that allowed you to zoom seamlessly all the way down to the natural resolution of an image... and could be handled on a 500 MHz Pentium 3 with easy. My PC here at work was kinda struggling with the Seadragon bit.
  • by ignavus (213578)

    The iPhone is not at the top of the Windows share, it is a non-Windows mobile phone that exceeds the Windows share.

    If I top the class in a subject, I am the best student doing that subject. So if the iPhone tops the Windows share, it would be the highest-selling Windows-based mobile phone. Which is false.

    So the title is misleading and/or confusing.

  • by caywen (942955) on Monday December 15, 2008 @08:51PM (#26127261)
    I think the iPhone has one major achilles' heel which is Apple's ludicrous approval process. Developer frustration is beginning to boil over as many go weeks and months without so much as a peep as to where their hard work stands. And then after waiting for so long, they get notified that there's a misspelling, or that Apple doesn't like your icon. If they continue to alienate developers like this, and if Google, RIM, Nokia, and Microsoft provide a far more open experience, I think you'll start to see this juggernaut start to slow down. Other factors include just how much stupid stuff an AppStore user has to wade through to get to the good apps, and the extreme fragility of the Xcode code signing / deployment system is (sudden 0xE8000001 errors with the SDK 2.2 update, anyone?) iPhone is a good platform to develop for, but Apple's inability to get its SDK tools solid and its completely confusing, inconsistent, and nebulous approval system are just plain painful.
    • by Gordo_1 (256312) on Monday December 15, 2008 @10:57PM (#26128309)

      Well, you know you're probably right to an extent. But the flip side to the arrogance shown developers is that Apple has managed to centralize, simplify and ensure a certain quality of apps for users. Apple has the upper hand right now because they've attracted a lot of eyeballs by addressing problems that no other cell phone company seemed able to address. Time will tell whether their arrogance will hinder them.

      As a dedicated Blackberry Bold user myself (who regularly plays around with his girlfriend's iPhone 3G) I am left with a distinct 'last-generation' feeling when it comes to finding, installing and using apps designed for the blackberry. Of the ones that I manage to install (typically OTA via sms-sent URLs), many are designed for last-generation low-rez BBs or are converted java-midp apps that don't map navigation keys the same way RIM does... Or they're very buggy, or cause the OS to crash. Don't get me wrong, it's a plenty usable email device and good mobile phone, but it's missing a certain attention to detail when it comes to end-to-end user experience that Apple seems to have achieved with the iPhone and App Store.

  • Seadragon, huh? Mozilla called and they want their naming scheme back.
  • by DJRumpy (1345787) on Monday December 15, 2008 @09:02PM (#26127377)
    I originally laughed at the folks who stood in line days before the release to be sure to get the first ones out of the store. I thought it was insane to pay that much for a phone or to treat it like the latest Star Wars movie. That is until I got curious and watched a few demos on the apple site a few months after it's release. I had no idea that touch technology had gone so far, or that the folks at Apple had done it so well. I was simply floored.

    The techie in me took over shortly after that, and I began losing sleep until I chose to go to the store and buy one (1st gen 2G).

    It's been an odd journey for me. I was a Windows guy. Not a fan by any means as their pricing and licensing infuriates me, but I didn't use any other OS as a primary.

    Since my iPhone purchase, I have since purchased my first Macbook Pro, and bought my second 3G iPhone. Don't get me wrong. I see the same sort of corporate headedness from Apple that I saw from MS. Maybe not as extreme in most cases, but it's there. That being said, Apple does do things in a very polished manner which makes the attempts to lock you into Apple much less 'painful'. I just don't know how else to describe it.

    All because I had to get curious about what the fascination was all about.

    Kudos on what has to be one of the most innovative and most duplicated pieces of tech for the last few years running.
  • Oh how we bitched and mocked about the iPhone V1, (me included). Locked down, no 3G, GPS... 'Geeks' users I know were all disppointed by their purchases.

    But the market is not geeks; it's my wife, teenage kids and other technical 'don't care' or illiterates - I think the iPod is poor value, (and don't get me started on iTunes) - but they all rejected the (cheaper, more functional) mp3/4 players I offered them and wanted iPods. (Although they do prefer MediaMonkey to iTunes).

    So the market did not listen to

  • I'm seriously debating whether I want to stick with the iPhone myself. Its a great phone... when it works. I've already had to have it replaced by Apple four times for myriads of issues, including the negative black problem, dead zones on the touch screen rendering menus unusable, and consistent lock-ups during boot that would make my phone unusable for 12-hour stretches of time. I'd really like a phone with a great interface that just worked.

    It doesn't help my opinion of Apple that my MacBook's internal

    • by abigor (540274)

      You have incredibly terrible luck. My Macbook has taken a beating, including being dropped onto cement and accidently left inside a smoking hot metal trunk, and not a peep. Not one iPhone that I use or that anyone I know owns has failed for any reason, and some of these things see massive usage (movie industry people). And my iPod Nano has been through hell and back due to my travels - dropped more times than I can remember, left lying in super hot direct sunlight, buried in sand - and it works fine, althou

  • by ClosedSource (238333) on Monday December 15, 2008 @10:52PM (#26128265)

    "The success of iPhone 3G sales in the third quarter of 2008 propelled the Mac OS X to the No. 3 position in the global OS provider rankings. For the first time, iPhone sales exceeded sales of Microsoft Windows Mobile devices worldwide and in North America."

    So in the 3rd quarter of this year, iPhone sales exceeded sales of MS mobile devices in the same period. Unless you define "market share" in terms of the last quarter sales only, MS devices still have a larger market share than the iPhone.

  • First, just because Gardner says it doesn't make it gospel. Gardner DOES blackmail companies to include them in their surveys and they have a bias towards US companies. I suspect this survey basically excludes the Asian market. So the results are highly suspect.

    Second, the article on Edible Apple is highly misleading in implying the marketshare of the iPhone is greater than that of Windows Mobile. It is not. The marketshare of PHONES SOLD IN Q308 ONLY is 12.9% vs. MS' 11.1% in a quarter when Apple introduce

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