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OS X Operating Systems

Tiger's 200 New Features 903

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the spotlight-is-still-to-slow dept.
An anonymous reader writes "If this hasn't already been posted, Apple set up a page listing, by software section, all of the new features for OS X.4, or Tiger. Given that every upgrade touts over a hundred features, it is interesting to see all of the enhancements to this upgrade to see what adopters get out of the box. There are a lot which are tweaks, some new non-Spotlight oriented features and a few that are interesting, mostly security related features. 2 words: stealth mode. "
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Tiger's 200 New Features

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  • Awsome. (Score:5, Informative)

    by Pooldraft (756431) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @08:48AM (#12261306)
    It seems to run a bit quicker with every release, unlike my poor SP2 machine. Go OSX.
    • Re:Awsome. (Score:3, Funny)

      by Rico_Suave (147634)
      Considering how horribly slow 10.0 was, it could only get faster.
  • by empty drum (876694) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @08:49AM (#12261315) Homepage Journal
    Every time Apple improves upon OSX, Microsoft delays the release
    of Longhorn another 6 months.

    Coincidence?

    I think not!

    :)

    • by gstoddart (321705) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:32AM (#12261593) Homepage
      Every time Apple improves upon OSX, Microsoft delays the release

      of Longhorn another 6 months.

      Don't forget removing 5 more features. :-P
  • 200+? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by plumby (179557) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @08:54AM (#12261340)
    There looks like there will be some great new features in Tiger, but I think they are stretching it with things like "Import contacts into Address Book in a variety of formats, including tab-delimited and comma-separated text." and "Print a handy pocket address book to take with you anywhere."

    By including this type of thing in the list it threatens to swallow all of the real new features like Dashboard and Spotlight.
    • Re:200+? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by patsalov (710245) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:01AM (#12261384)
      Some of the new features may be a stretch, but you must also admit that there are hundreds of new features in Xcode 2 alone, which is only mentioned once.
    • Re:200+? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by sabinm (447146) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:18AM (#12261497) Homepage Journal
      While I'd be inclined to agree with you on a lot of these points, what I'd add as some justification is that a lot of the features that will be included as _default_ in Tiger are not available by default in a ready-made usable form in windows. A quality photo manager, excellent chat client, a usable mail application, decent file management (the one thing all modern OS lack), dvd playback, multimedia playback suite, all these things microsoft sells as a additional product (did anyone go out and buy XP Plus)? Or you must download or buy as stand-alone anyway. So, yeah. Saves me tons of time and money by purchasing Tiger for the program suite alone, and makes the improvements worth the time, money and effort. (Where I live bandwidth is metered and capped at 2gig so I don't try all the quality free software or even quality commercial downloadable software I want). Once a year and a half I upgrade my OS for a hundred and thirty bucks. I think it's worth it. Plus, I know that if I don't upgrade, no one is slowly trying to push me out of usability of my old programs by making them imcompatible with the next version of whatever the that company decides to push.
    • Re:200+? (Score:3, Funny)

      by Tim Browse (9263)

      How about:

      Dashboard Keyboard Activation Preference
      Easily change the default key that activates the Dashboard.

      That's my favourite so far :)

    • Re:200+? (Score:4, Interesting)

      by telbij (465356) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @02:42PM (#12263562)
      By including this type of thing in the list it threatens to swallow all of the real new features like Dashboard and Spotlight.

      If you read the overview page or read any of the thousands of reviews around the net you'll get the major features. Of course, everyone here already knows them...

      This is exactly the kind of detailed list that geeks should appreciate. All the Apple haters want to spin it as propaganda, but those of us seriously considering the upgrade might like to know these things. For instance, I don't consider OpenEXR support in Preview to be a major feature by any stretch, but it's something I'll use every day.

      Now if they said 200+ new features and didn't list them then there would be a problem. Let the people judge for themselves I say.
  • by Jugalator (259273) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @08:56AM (#12261349) Journal
    It's essential for any respectable firewall, and both e.g. Kerio and ZA even for Windows should have this, and both are available in free versions.

    And firewall log?? Hmm, excuse me, but is the news Tiger just got a standard quality firewall or what? That's be more reason to blush than be overjoyed IMHO.
    • by remahl (698283) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:02AM (#12261386)
      OS X's firewall is very competent (ipfw). However, Apple's GUI for it was quite rudimentary, for good and for bad. It basically had a button to turn it on or off and one to open ports.

      Most consumer-oriented firewalls overdo the configurability and impose the log on users who would be better of not knowing how many malicious and non-malicious "attacks" are directed towards their computers, as long as the firewall blocks them. It's the attacks that aren't blocked / logged that should be interesting.

      Apple always strives to strike a balance between "user-friendliness" and power. Apparently they decided they should give stealth mode to those who need it and make it easier to view a log.
    • The news is that they just got built-in tools to configure it. In comparison to Windows, third-party programs have been available to configure (not really install, since OS X uses IPFW from FreeBSD) the firewall in a user-friendly way since its release. The firewall has always been available in OS X, its just that you had to use the UNIX underpinnings or find a third-party program to use advanced features.
    • Client firewalls are of limited utility. I don't understand why people bother with them.

      If you need to provide access to a service, then you have to open its matching ports anyway. If you need to protect a port/daemon/service/wakilix from attack, just don't run it. The only reason for a firewall is to protect you when you can't turn one off for some reason, and if that's the case then you're probably using Windows.
      • by nahdude812 (88157) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:56AM (#12261760) Homepage
        Well, yours is an optomistic view. Refreshing :-).

        The idea isn't to protect against attack on all those services you have running but don't use, it's to minimise potential damage if you are compromised. If the firewall blocks port 31337 on a windows box, and BackOrifice gets installed, the user is compromised but not exposed.

        Also, as another user mentioned, there's the issue of spyware that might set up a listening port, or just any other software which fails to protect itself well, but which you need to run locally. Put holes in the firewall only for those things you know for sure you want the outside having access to, and no matter what crap happens on the client machine, its exposure is still the same.

        Also, there's selective access that happens on a client firewall. My database server has a firewall in place to protect its copy of MySQL. Only my http server can connect on that port, anyone else, the OS simply drops the packet (which is the old term for this fancy new "stealth mode").

        Firewalls do more than simply provide all or none access to the world, even client firewalls.
      • I don't understand why people bother with them.

        If you need to provide access to a service, then you have to open its matching ports anyway. If you need to protect a port/daemon/service/wakilix from attack, just don't run it.

        Because most people don't understand that a firewall should only be a secondary protection mechanism for your computer or network. It shouldn't be your sole line of defense.

        Personally, I make sure my machines don't have anything running or listening that doesn't need to be. Really,

    • by cortana (588495) <sam.robots@org@uk> on Sunday April 17, 2005 @10:05AM (#12261811) Homepage
      Stealth mode essential? Please. It doesn't make you much more secure--it just pisses off legitimate users of the network.

      http://homepage.ntlworld.com/robin.d.h.walker/cm ti ps/security.html#stealth
  • iptables -A INPUT -m state --state NEW -i ! eth0 -j ACCEPT
    iptables -P INPUT DROP
    /bin/echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/icmp_echo_ignore_all
  • Password Helper (Score:5, Insightful)

    by SuperBanana (662181) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:02AM (#12261389)
    a few that are interesting, mostly security related features

    I think a lot of network admins will breath a sigh of partial relief when they see the Password Helper. There will always be the "[kids_name]123" password people, but there are a decent number of users who want something secure but easy to remember, and to know roughly how secure a particular password is.

    • by rastakid (648791) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:30AM (#12261581) Homepage Journal
      I think a lot of network admins will breath a sigh of partial relief when they see the Password Helper. There will always be the "[kids_name]123" password people, but there are a decent number of users who want something secure but easy to remember, and to know roughly how secure a particular password is.

      No, you don't understand. This tool asks you the name of your child and then adds a number from a certain pool to it. The pool contains numbers like '111','321' and '123'.
  • WoW.... (Score:4, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:04AM (#12261408)
    If it's a tiger, shouldn't it have Prowl mode?

    Cats rock!

  • by Tibor the Hun (143056) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:04AM (#12261413)
    I was just sitting at my freelance gig, reading some online encyclopedia (win supersite, I believe) and the scientist there said that there are only 2 features: spotlight and something else. He stated that all other ones are pretty much nothing.

    He also said, and I'll have to agree with him on this one, that SP 2 is a much better update than Tiger, and it's FREE!

    I don't even know what you MAC people are cheering about, you're not even getting a firewall OR pop-up blocker, not to mention malicious software detector with you're upgrade your paying $$ 4! LOL!

  • by doon (23278) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:07AM (#12261426) Homepage
    From the list:

    Use command line file commands on HFS+ items with proper results -- utilities such as cp, mv, tar, rsync now use the same standard APIs as Spotlight and access control lists to handle resource forks.

    Being both a Mac User and a Command LIne Junky. This makes me happy.
  • by nguyenhm (577058) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:07AM (#12261428)
    I think the most interesting new features of Tiger are under the hood. Those four new frameworks add an incredible amount of functionality into the base OS, which can be easily used by future applications. For examle, CoreImage adds tons of image processing features a la Photoshop, is extensible, and uses the GPU.
    • by Queer Boy (451309) * <`dragon.76' `at' `mac.com'> on Sunday April 17, 2005 @10:45AM (#12262087)
      CoreImage adds tons of image processing features a la Photoshop

      No, CoreImage goes WAY beyond Photoshop because the effects are real-time GPU accelerated and non-destructive. The developer tools comes with an application called CoreImage funhouse which is rudimentary but works. I look for GraphicConvertor to add CoreImage to the next version and really put a hurt on Photoshop Elements.

      It's amazing to perform filters in realtime and scrub the centerpoint to watch the image change. These are effects that were only available to high-end applications like Photoshop that now every shareware author has direct access to.

    • by totoanihilation (782326) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @10:46AM (#12262088)
      The image units are really cool indeed. Not only will there be a standard for "filters" built into the OS, but every app will be able to use them (including AdobeCS, iPhoto, Office, etc)
      But where it becomes interesting is in the freeware domain. These image units greatly level the playing field. It will become excessively easy to build an image manipulation app in Cocoa that not only uses all these same filters (+ the third party ones) but also uses the hardware to its full potential (i.e. GPU-accelerated filters). Adobe will face some serious competition (specially if we look at PS Elements). I can also see The Gimp having a hard time competing on the Mac without some serious remodeling of their design philosophy.

      In all, these new APIs will make it A LOT easier for the next killer-app(s) to be developed on OSX. And that, to me, is the biggest feature of Tiger.
  • Too expensive.... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Rick Zeman (15628) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:09AM (#12261444)
    ...at $129 yet again, but I've got the family pack on pre-order, so amortize the $150 after the Amazon rebate across 4 Macs and it's quite the bargain. They should really provide upgrade pricing, but the $129 list is still wayyyyy cheaper than XP Pro, but twice as expensive as my SUSE 9.2 boxed set.
  • moderating here... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mike_scheck (512662) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:17AM (#12261488)
    I just wanted to point out that I have been on slashdot for a while now, and I have *never* seen a thread with so many posts moderated as "troll", "flamebait" or "offtopic". Many of the posts are valid points, and if they were discussing microsoft, they would be modded +5 funny, or +5 informative. It seems to me someone is taking things a little too defensively.

    For the record, I hate microsoft, and I am a unix guy at heart. That doesn't mean that everyting apple feeds to me I have to love. A little healthy criticism does everyone good, including apple.
    • by Queer Boy (451309) * <`dragon.76' `at' `mac.com'> on Sunday April 17, 2005 @10:53AM (#12262125)
      The point of the moderation system is for people to have a choice when browsing. You can turn the noise up or down in preferences. Moderation is meaningless unless you use it.

      Brash criticism from people whose opinion of the subject is basically worthless to me (they don't have a Mac, have never had a Mac, are never going to get a Mac) is best ignored. That's the bulk of the noise that's been modded out of my threshold.

      It's akin to a black person discussing being Asian. They're not Asian and have never been Asian and are never going to be Asian. Why do I care what they think about being Asian?

    • by node 3 (115640) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @11:03AM (#12262182)
      just wanted to point out that I have been on slashdot for a while now, and I have *never* seen a thread with so many posts moderated as "troll", "flamebait" or "offtopic".

      That's because there are many posts that are trolls, flamebait, and offtopic. These are the same ol' ignorant things over and over again...

      Some highlights:

      Apple is just like MS, only smaller!

      $129? For a point release?!

      Forget OS X, install Linux!

      200 features? I counted like, 3, tops.

      Spotlight? How lame, "ooh, I can search now."

      The only thing missing is the "1-button mouse" complaint.

      if they were discussing microsoft

      But they aren't. Context really is important. It's fully rational to treat MS cynically. That's just the sort of company MS is. That's like saying a post that questioned IBM's open sourcing of a program is just as valid as a post questioning MS's doing the same. IBM has proven they really do support FS/OSS, while MS has truly open sourced all of something like two trivial things.

      Apple products truly do get better with each new release. MS products, for the most part, just get different. Why? Is it Jobs vs Gates? Is it underdog vs monopoly? Is it good vs evil? Probably some of each, and much more, I don't know. But time and again, the two companies really do act in very different ways, deserving very different opinions.

  • Entourage/Spotlight (Score:5, Interesting)

    by dimer0 (461593) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:21AM (#12261523)
    One of the new features is that Mail.app supports Exchange servers - but I have a feeling this is just imap support and won't handle meeting invites, etc.

    So, I'm stuck using Entourage. Does anyone know if Spotlight will be indexing Entourage emails, etc? I sure hope so! My corporation has ignorantly banned Google Desktop search on the windows machines, so I no longer have a way of finding emails I need in a snap. Entourage + Spotlight puts me back in the game on that front.
    • by ruiner13 (527499) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @01:13PM (#12262986) Homepage
      " One of the new features is that Mail.app supports Exchange servers - but I have a feeling this is just imap support and won't handle meeting invites, etc."

      Actually, mail handles it correctly even in 10.3. Meeting invites open iCal and place it on your calendar (if you accept, of course). It has worked perfectly thus far for my mac. We have POP3 access turned on in our exchange server, and I have been using it as such. The new feature is that I don't have to use POP3 any more, I can connect natively, and access my address book and such, I assume.

  • Stupid Macs (Score:4, Funny)

    by Wylfing (144940) <brian@wyGAUSSlfing.net minus math_god> on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:23AM (#12261538) Homepage Journal
    While Apple fiddles around with ridiculous improvements like these, Microsoft is hard at work breaking new ground in computing. I hear they're going to make it so icons act like previews of the document! You can keep your toy Macs, I'll wait for a real operating system, thank you.

  • ACL (Score:4, Interesting)

    by 3770 (560838) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:24AM (#12261542) Homepage
    I'm surprised that they have Access Control Lists as one of the features.

    I mean, that is something I've been wanting standard on Linux for a long time (I haven't used Linux in a while now so let me know if it is standard now).

    I'm also surprised that the /. community isn't all over that feature.

    I would have expected apple to bang the drum a lot more on that feature. But I guess that apples target group aren't that enamored with technical points.
  • by CoffeePlease (596791) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:39AM (#12261653) Homepage
    ..as advertised. This is what graphic artists have been waiting for, a font manager that's STABLE with thousands of fonts. Suitcase is, but the interface is pitiful. FontAgent is easy to browse, but unstable with lots of fonts and if you turn on WYSIWYG in some views. There's been a big hole in the font management area for a long time now. http://www.apple.com/macosx/features/fontbook/ [apple.com]
  • Feature? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Zebra_X (13249) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:45AM (#12261699)
    FTFA - How is this a feature?

    Buy Printing Supplies
    Easily purchase supplies for your printer right from Mac OS X Tiger.


    I (and I think many others) don't want their operating system selling them crap.
  • by EvilStein (414640) <spam@@@pbp...net> on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:46AM (#12261704) Homepage
    RSS feeds as a screen saver. It's actually pretty cool. :)
  • by ryan_fung (610676) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @09:47AM (#12261707)
    Apple also posted a more readable comparison table with Panther and Jaguar at http://www.apple.com/macosx/upgrade/compare.html .
  • by mbaciarello (800433) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @10:07AM (#12261823)

    One thing sorely missing from Panther was the ability to AppleScript power management features. It would come in handy for putting your Mac to sleep after a long task, or to wake it up upon certain conditions.

    In order to do that, IIRC, you had to buy a third party extension/dictionary/API. A workaround was also to script at the UI level and simulate clicks in the menus - very inelegant, prone to failure and useless for waking up the machine.

    The new features list in TFA doesn't cite this addition. Does it mean users will still have to resort to third-party software for this basic ability? Automator might help, but still it's not the same as a full-fledged AppleScript dictionary...

  • by theolein (316044) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @10:37AM (#12262038) Journal
    I notice quite a lot of the usual complaining about Apple charging for a point release of an operating system where Microsoft would give it for free.

    While those people are right in that they are likely to get modded down by Mac fans, the complaints seldom offer much insight into what is a point release, what is a service pack and what is a full version number. To be fair, the OS vendors, both Apple and Microsoft, don't make it easy on the consumer either.

    Apple generally gives out their version of point releases (10.x.x) for free, but those point releases usually don't offer much or any new functionality. (Currently I'm on OSX 10.3.9) which includes a new version of the Safari browser (1.3) but that is unusual. Apple also usually gives out point releases of the various software accompanying the OS for free (iTunes, QuickTime, iSight, iPod, Bluetooth etc) and they provide specific security patches as new exploits become available.(although there are currently about two hanging security issues that Apple really needs to fix)

    Apple usually includes quite a lot of new extra functionality in the version upgrades (10.x). In the 10.3 Panther upgrade it was Expose, Fast User Switching, iChatAV and XCode and under the hood new APIs (Cocoa Bindings etc). in 10.4, it's Dashboard, Spotlight, XCode 2, Safari 2, Mail 2, Automator and a lot of new APIs (Core Data, Core Image etc.)

    Microsoft is a little less consistent with its OS upgrades, pathces and service packs, but also follows a certain strategy. Generally, Microsoft offers API changes and some minor functionality changes in service packs, but rarely major new features. For example, WinNT went from sp1 to sp6 and actually gained a lot of the functionality that was in the Win98 and Win2k userspace, and NT users got those for free. Active Desktop for example (one can argue about how useful that was). Moving from NTSP6 to Win2k would not have entailed major changes for the common user, but, obviously, there was a lot that changed under the hood. Better security model, more stable, some minor UI changes, better networking etc. Obviously, for a user, it was worth paying for.

    All the while, Microsoft also offered generally free upgrades to its bundled applications, such as IE, Outlook and WMP, although there was an outcry about the mp3 quality and MS' charging for better quality.

    But can the same be said for the Win98SE to WinME upgrade? WinMe had a terrible reputation and was seen by many as an excuse by Microsoft to generate revenue.

    And the Win2k to WinXP move, while also having some big under the hood changes (firewall, signed drivers etc), mostly had big UI changes (themes) and Fast User Switching, Automatic Updates (also in 2kSp3 onwards) etc. For the user, and the developer, it was probably worth the price. Since then Microsoft has offered two service packs, both free. SP1 had no visible change but fixed some glaring security and stability issues. During this time Microsoft has released literally hundreds of security patches, thankfully, free.

    Now comes the part to argue over. XPSP2 offers a new security center and a firewall on by default. It also upgrades IE. SP2 is free. BUT, the security enhancements for SP2, including the IE upgrade, are not available for Win2k. Microsoft was getting a terrible rap with WinXP up to SP1. It was almost impossible to install a new machine on the net (activation) without getting hit by some of the rabid attacks going on within a few minutes. Microsoft HAD to do something, and, if they had charged for SP2, there would have been an even bigger outcry by an extremely digruntled public.

    My personal opinion about Microsoft is that Microsoft, in a way that only Microsoft does well, decided to use the opportunity to both garner some lost respect by including the new security features, but also enforce upgrades amongst its userbase by excluding Win2k. This, I think, is something that Microsoft specialises at, prodding its userbase with new features, but including a catch somew
    • by argent (18001)
      And the Win2k to WinXP move, while also having some big under the hood changes (firewall, signed drivers etc), mostly had big UI changes (themes) and Fast User Switching, Automatic Updates (also in 2kSp3 onwards) etc. For the user, and the developer, it was probably worth the price.

      Was it? I've eventually backed Windows XP out of every machine that came with XP installed, because it doesn't seem to have any useful functionality not already provided by Windows 2000. The big difference between 2000 and XP i
    • I notice quite a lot of the usual complaining about Apple charging for a point release of an operating system where Microsoft would give it for free.

      I think the flaw is right there.
      1) This isn't a point release, it is a major release. Consider the "10" as fixed, like the "2" in Solaris. Would you expect Sun to give Solaris 2.10 for free, since it's just a point release from 2.9 (or by extension, 2.0)?

      2) What goes into a release is arbitrary, what consitutes enoughto make a point release is arbitrary, t
    • I notice quite a lot of the usual complaining about Apple charging for a point release of an operating system where Microsoft would give it for free.
      I hate to double post a reply to the same parent, but I forgot to mention in my other response...

      XP is marked as 5.1, NT2000 is 5.0, so XP is a point release, and MS certainly charged for it.
  • by TempusMagus (723668) * on Sunday April 17, 2005 @11:05AM (#12262196) Homepage Journal
    I hope I'm not blasting my NDA saying this, but we've been using seed builds for a while and the one thing that I think many people will be pleasantly surprised with is the sense of responsiveness/speed. I'm using a spanking new G4 laptop and using Tiger on it makes it feel like I have an ever faster machine (which is what I said about 10.3!). Everything is more responsive; screen redraws, directory listings, quicktime videos, etc. It's on-par with my AMD64 box with XP in terms of GUI resposiveness now!
  • by Qbertino (265505) on Sunday April 17, 2005 @11:23AM (#12262328)
    I actually expect this release to be a milestone in GUI operating systems. Not only is inter-programm communication fully developed, it also gets a easy to use point-and-click interface to access these functions (Automator).
    What would really rock is if someday Apple had the guts to actually drop the desktop metaphor and introduce some non-overlaping full screen realestate using workspace and application management. Something like blender has - only more accessable of course.

    How long have knowledgable users of Windows, Linux and Mac OS dreamed of easy cross-program automation via visual graphical pipes. Once again it's OS X that's years ahead of anything else.

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