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Apple Starts Assembling iPhones In India (techcrunch.com) 56

Apple has successfully completed its first trial run assembly of the iPhone SE in India, reports The Wall Street Journal. "We are beginning initial production of a small number of iPhone SE in Bengaluru," Apple said in a statement to TechCrunch. "iPhone SE is the most popular and powerful phone with a four-inch display in the world and we'll begin shipping to domestic customers this month." From the report: The four-inch SE is Apple's least expensive model, running $399 in the States. Some retailers in the country have managed to undercut the cost, lower the entry level price of the handset by around $80 -- but even at that price, it's still substantially more expensive than most. In spite of its relatively low pricing, the SE doesn't appear to have made quite the splash Apple was initially anticipating in the country. Apple has long been working to move production to the country, hoping, in part, to retake some of the market it has lost in China in recent years, as domestic handset sales have grown. Locals are hoping that such a move could reduce the retail cost of the SE even further, by as much as $100. But while $220 is certainly a lot more palatable, that still marks a substantial premium over the average handset price. It's the world's fastest growing market, having recently surpassed the U.S. to claim the number. The Indian market is expected to generate somewhere in the neighborhood of one billion smartphone sales over the next half-decade.

Apple Starts Assembling iPhones In India

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  • as markets mature and competitors' lower priced products with similar or better features gain currency, apple needs to find markets where there are still consumers who get fooled by hype to buy overpriced mediocre products.
    or abandon the hype and absurd overpricing, and just try to satisfy customers at lowest prices that are still profitable, as others do. but that would make fanbois cry.

    • by baker_tony ( 621742 ) on Wednesday May 17, 2017 @07:10PM (#54437683) Homepage

      As a Nexus, followed by Samsung and now Apple user, I have to say, you're a moron if you believe that dribble.
      Android is very flexible, get one if you want to tweak and customize stuff.
      Apple phones are consistent, fluid and reliable, get one if you want it to just work.
      Each to their own.

      • Amen to that. I've been given a 4S (needs a new battery), one of their best designs, Wish it was never upgraded beyond IOS6, I miss that interface, now it's all flat, feels like either Win3.11 or Win8. It currently runs on IOS 9.x (a little slow, but still runs)

      • Sounds like a fair description. But can you define what you mean by fluid? That adjective seems a bit less specific and meaningful than the others you gave.
        • My personal experience is that Android is more likely to stutter and freeze momentarily (even after updates and factory resets, they start off smooth then after a few days/weeks, seem to slow). I've found iOS to behave smooth like butter compared to smooth like margarine with a couple pinches of sand.

      • Apple phones are consistent, fluid and reliable, get one if you want it to just work.

        It just works, except when it doesn't.

      • by thsths ( 31372 )

        Exactly. Android is much more powerful in many ways, while iOS seems restrictive beyond reason. But it does work well, incredibly well (which I would not say for Android - it just works, kind of).

        • The irony is that I've found I've spent a lot of my time in Android trying to find stuff like texting apps which emulate iOS's :-)
          Some of the good things about the restriction, is that it forces app developers in to having to do it Apple's way, so restrictive, but makes things seamless/consistent.
          However the restriction is annoying, when I can't make Chrome and Google Maps the defaults, or have to manually trigger the lastpass extension to fill in logins.

    • A vertical supply chain, totally in house, with full automation at every step. All costs come from human labour so get rid of the humans and you can sell an Iphone for a dollar. Having all that money in the (offshore) bank means they can afford the massive cost to do this, and bury their competition.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    You expect them to lower price as their cost decreases?

    • by AHuxley ( 892839 )
      More just for local tax issues. Build a factory and the local product gets a local tax rate. Fully imported and its a different tax in some nations.
  • The race of global businesses to cut costs by exporting labor is just going to result in everyone living in a third world country.

    • by alvinrod ( 889928 ) on Wednesday May 17, 2017 @08:06PM (#54438055)
      Actually globalism and this offshoring of labor has lead to drastic increases in the middle class for both China and India. Eventually machines will replace a lot of that cheap foreign labor, but it won't really matter since it means that it's even less expensive to produce the different goods and services that people want or need. Cutting costs and driving down the cost of goods and services is the only real way to eradicate poverty.
      • Actually globalism and this offshoring of labor has lead to drastic increases in the middle class for both China and India.

        Yes it has and it's also resulted in suppressed wages in the US and thus moving the middle class in the US closer to poverty. My point is that if we keep going on at this pace that it will make us all equally poor.

        • Yes it has and it's also resulted in suppressed wages in the US and thus moving the middle class in the US closer to poverty.

          Manufacturing job losses in America have been driven more by automation than by outsourcing. Lower wages are offset by lower prices for products made by machines or Asians. So the cost to Americans has been far, far less than the gains in Asia. Living standards in China have gone up eight-fold over the last 30 years.

          My point is that if we keep going on at this pace that it will make us all equally poor.

          My point is that this is nonsense. Improvements in productivity do not lead to poverty.

        • by JBMcB ( 73720 )

          Yes it has and it's also resulted in suppressed wages in the US and thus moving the middle class in the US closer to poverty. My point is that if we keep going on at this pace that it will make us all equally poor.

          It's been going "at this pace" for decades, centuries in some markets. You're assuming a zero sum game, if they have something then we can't have it, too. The truth is that the more people are involved in a market, the more wealth is created.

          Also, nothing is stopping you from "buying American." You can buy made in the US shoes from Alden for $300, made in the US shirts from Brooks Brothers for $100, made in the US khakis from Bills for $100, made in the US jeans from Earnest Sewn for $200.

          If you don't like

          • You're assuming a zero sum game, if they have something then we can't have it, too.

            Parts of it a zero sum but obviously not all of it.

            The truth is that the more people are involved in a market, the more wealth is created.

            Ahh, the foolish armchair economist and his ideas about "wealth" that don't align with reality. Nice to meet you once more.

            Also, nothing is stopping you from "buying American." You can buy made in the US shoes from Alden for $300, made in the US shirts from Brooks Brothers for $100, made in the US khakis from Bills for $100, made in the US jeans from Earnest Sewn for $200.

            If you don't like paying that much, then you can't complain that much about globalism.

            That's the dumbest thing I've read on this subject. Congratulations on taking the title of fool.

            • Also, nothing is stopping you from "buying American." You can buy made in the US shoes from Alden for $300, made in the US shirts from Brooks Brothers for $100, made in the US khakis from Bills for $100, made in the US jeans from Earnest Sewn for $200.

              If you don't like paying that much, then you can't complain that much about globalism.

              That's the dumbest thing I've read on this subject. Congratulations on taking the title of fool.

              It's not dumb at all. Quite a few people here on /. argue that they would be happy to pay more for products, so companies should only hire Americans for everything. "Your local dairy farm shouldn't hire temporary farm workers from Mexico, because Americans would be willing to do that work if they paid a market wage." Well, here's your chance. Go ahead and pay 5-10 times the cost for a pair of blue jeans. Put your money where your mouth is.

        • Actually globalism and this offshoring of labor has lead to drastic increases in the middle class for both China and India.

          Yes it has and it's also resulted in suppressed wages in the US and thus moving the middle class in the US closer to poverty. My point is that if we keep going on at this pace that it will make us all equally poor.

          How so? It's not like "line worker in manufacturing" ever was a middle class job description.

      • Automation in places like the US, Canada or Europe will easily trounce manufacturing in places like China, India or Africa. Since those low wages won't offset the quality degradation that will necessarily happen when manufactured by cheap, rather than automated labor.
      • If a nation wants to help another nation then just charge an extra 10% tax to all citizens and send it over. It would be a great thing to do. Don't expect one small segment to do all the helping.
      • by AHuxley ( 892839 )
        Nets to catch workers?
  • TechCrunch wrote $220 (incorrect) instead of $320. WSJ got it right.
  • Not an Apples to well even a similar fruit comparison but GM appears to pass on the India masses temptation due to low margin low end models. The SE while still pricey by India ave consumer standards might trickle down from upper middle classes to masses in a year or to used so Apple might still succeed. At least it is still a standard model sort of. Apple still selling SE in Japan by budget brand Y mobile JP. If low tier autos make a come back as western world goes broke outsourcing to developing countrie

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