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Mac OS X Ruby/Objective-C Bridge Updated 35

phyxeld writes "RubyCocoa 0.4.0 is out. From the sf.net page: 'RubyCocoa is a Mac OS X framework that allows Cocoa programming in the Object-Oriented Scripting Language Ruby. RubyCocoa allows writing a Cocoa application in Ruby. It allows creating and using a Cocoa object in a Ruby script. In Cocoa application, mixture of program written by both Ruby and Objective-C is possible.' It's always nice to see more GPL software in the Mac OS X world."
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Mac OS X Ruby/Objective-C Bridge Updated

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  • by gl4ss ( 559668 ) on Monday December 30, 2002 @09:06PM (#4985307) Homepage Journal
    so, this makes doing ruby possible with cocoa or cocoa apps with ruby or cocoa possible with ruby.

    i may be tired but it was versed veerry confusing, something out of a bejeesus archaic journal v3.

    happy new years eve, k-suicide on.
  • by grammar nazi ( 197303 ) on Monday December 30, 2002 @09:06PM (#4985311) Journal
    The grammar nazi could have a field day with this one:
    RubyCocoa is a Mac OS X framework that allows Cocoa programming in the Object-Oriented Scripting Language Ruby. RubyCocoa allows writing a Cocoa application in Ruby. It allows creating and using a Cocoa object in a Ruby script. In Cocoa application, mixture of program written by both Ruby and Objective-C is possible.
    I heard that Ruby was mostly popular over in Japan, but I didn't expect this kind of Engrish at Sourceforge!
    • by Anonymous Coward
      "I heard that Ruby was mostly popular over in Japan, but I didn't expect this kind of Engrish at Sourceforge!"

      Sourceforge isn't US-only site. And you can't expect that every non-native writes English fluently.

      Maybe next time they will write the description in Japanese to get it perfect.

      ^rubic
    • As a native English speaker, I'd like to apologize to our Japanese friends for this remark and thank them for all their efforts.

      Devon
    • Hi, I'm from Japan. I have no ability to code like implementor of RubyCocoa, so I try to translate what he want to express with his words. I hope this will help.

      RubyCocoa is a Framework of OS X, which enables you to write Cocoa programs with Ruby, an object-oriented scripting language. It is also possible to use RubyCocoa to generate objects, whose function you may call from Objective-C.

      Below are some of my understandings about Ruby and RubyCocoa.
      1. RubyCocoa has basically no relation to Mr. Matsumoto, originator of Ruby.
      2. Ruby is a set of libraries, which are made from C. RubyCocoa is a set of libraries (frameworks), which are (may be) made from Objective-C.
      3. Both Ruby and Objective-C have a lot of influence from Smalltalk, so the way of method call looks similar.
      4. Even in Japan, Python may be more popular than Ruby in real business (it may be because of Zope).

  • by josephgrossberg ( 67732 ) on Monday December 30, 2002 @09:46PM (#4985461) Homepage Journal

    The fact Ruby is popular over there seems to be an oft-quoted tidbit.

    How common is this? Do programming languages vary that much in popularity from region to region? (O'Reilly's Ruby book [oreilly.co.jp] came out in Japan two years before the English-language Ruby in a Nutshell.)

    If so, why do you think that's the case? That influential programmers/managers give a particular language the nod early on? That documentation is published early in a particular language? That (OK, this is stretching it) Japanese syntax shares commonalities with Ruby?

    • In the case of ruby, I think it is primarily because the creator of the language, Yukihiro Matsumoto aka matz, is Japanese. As a result of this, ruby handles multibyte input natively, and has done so since it was created. I think led to its widespread adoption in Japan, since it would be easier to write scripts using native Japanese characters. (Disclaimer: I haven't personally worked with Japanese characters in other scripting languages)
      ---
    • I think documentation is a big reason. The first English book for Ruby only came out in October 2000. Before that, non-Japanese speakers that wanted to learn Ruby had to sift through source code and examples and that's something that few programmers are willing to do.

      Devon
      • Yes, very few people actually take the time to look at source code examples written by people who know what they're doing.

        Incidentally, there are very few really good programmers. Must just be coincidence.
    • In case you didn't know, the author of Ruby is Japanese and lives (IIRC) in Japan, and for a long time little-to-no documentation existed in English for that reason.

      --
      Mando
  • by Wonko42 ( 29194 ) <ryan+slashdot AT wonko DOT com> on Monday December 30, 2002 @10:07PM (#4985536) Homepage
    "RubyCocoa is a Mac OS X framework that allows Cocoa programming in the Object-Oriented Scripting Language Ruby. RubyCocoa allows writing a Cocoa application in Ruby. It allows creating and using a Cocoa object in a Ruby script."

    So, let me get this straight. You're saying I can (gasp!) write a Cocoa application in Ruby? Which is to say that I can write a Cocoa application in Ruby? Let me put this another way: I can write a Cocoa application in Ruby? So in other words, I can write a Cocoa application in Ruby? Wow, Cocoa apps written in Ruby, who would've thought. Did I mention that you can write Cocoa apps in Ruby?

    • No, dammit, you missed the point -- you can write Cocoa applications in Ruby.
      • It's not exactly redundant.
        RubyCocoa is a framework for Mac OS X that allows Cocoa programming in the object-oriented scripting language Ruby.
        That's the whole hog.
        RubyCocoa allows you to write a Cocoa application in Ruby.
        That's an entire application with all the crap that a Cocoa app needs to live. It's compiled.
        It allows you to create a Cocoa object in a Ruby script and to use it.
        That's writing a Cocoa object in Ruby, instead of Obj-C or Java or AppleScript. The resulting object is fully reusable. Note that it's just an object.
        In Cocoa application, mixture of program written by both Ruby and Objective-C is possible.
        And what's more you can reuse that Ruby/Cocoa object in any Cocoa project.
  • AppleScript Studio (Score:4, Informative)

    by TiMac ( 621390 ) on Tuesday December 31, 2002 @12:30AM (#4986178)
    Sounds a little like Applescript Studio [apple.com], from Apple themselves...which allows Cocoa applications to be written with a mix of Applescript and Objective-C. I like this system because sometimes its easier and faster to develop an interaction or automation application with a scripting language like Applescript.

    This RubyCocoa I've not used, but I bet it shims in and allows the same sort of thing.

That's the thing about people who think they hate computers. What they really hate is lousy programmers. - Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle in "Oath of Fealty"

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