Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
China Government Iphone Portables (Apple) Apple

China Bans iPad, MacBook Pro, Other Apple Products For Government Use 115

Posted by timothy
from the regulatory dept.
MojoKid (1002251) writes "China seems to be on a mission to isolate itself from the world, at least in terms of technology. After banning Windows 8 on government PCs and raiding several of Microsoft's offices in China as part of an anti-trust investigation, Chinese officials have now prohibited purchase of several Apple products for government use. The list of banned Apple products include the iPad, iPad Mini, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, and half a dozen other items, all of which were left off of a final government procurement list distributed in July. This is a potentially big hit to Apple, which generated around 16 percent of its $37.4 billion in revenue last quarter from China. Apple saw its iPad sales jump 51 percent and Mac sales boosted 39 percent in China."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

China Bans iPad, MacBook Pro, Other Apple Products For Government Use

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:43PM (#47617607)

    Blame the NSA

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Not really. Apple products are domestic products in China.
    • by Skarjak (3492305) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @06:36PM (#47618097)
      Good point. How can anyone trust hardware and software coming from the states? Although when it comes to software, I'm sure that the NSA's people will be quite busy with trying to find security holes into whatever the Chinese decide to go with.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Times have changed
      Our politicians are getting worse
      They won't obey liberty and freedom
      They just want to litigate and sue!

      Should we blame the government?

      Or blame society?

      Or should we blame the images on TV?

      No, blame NSA!

      Blame NSA!

      (etc)

    • Blame the NSA

      No, blame the cash management finance department. China does not want local currency leaving the country. Stop the bleeding.

      If Apple and Google had headquarters in China, we might have seen a different decision taken.

  • by Joe_Dragon (2206452) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:44PM (#47617617)

    we will just use an knock off made at the same factory as your own stuff.

  • by Meditato (1613545) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:44PM (#47617623)

    ...for cooperating with the Machiavellian pro-war, pro-surveillance, pro-torture old boy's club in the federal bureaucracy.

    • by Jeremi (14640)

      Totally true -- but it's probably less than the price they'd pay for not co-operating.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      are you referring to China?

    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Who? China or US?
  • by Skarjak (3492305) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:45PM (#47617631)
    Up to now, they've been banning proprietary products for the benefit of more open ones. I know that we like to show China as a country with isolationist tendencies, but I'm not sure the glove fits on this one. I don't think choosing not to get screwed by Microsoft or Apple is such a bad thing.
    • by armanox (826486)

      I also remember them moving away from Intel-based stuff in general, in favor of MIPS that they can design and build everything themselves.

    • by erikkemperman (252014) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @06:35PM (#47618087)

      Presumably they are choosing not to get screwed by NSA, through proxies such as Apple and MS. But otherwise I agree entirely.

      I wish headlines such as

      China seems to be on a mission to isolate itself from the world, at least in terms of technology.

      Would more often be accompanied by its root cause, something along the lines of

      America seems to be on a mission to antagonize the rest of the world, not least in terms of technology.

    • by rtb61 (674572)

      When the government pushes particular products, the education is forced to follow suit and industry then complies. So not isolationist at all but setting the pace. This will end up proving problematic for both M$ and Apple as it spreads throughout the China supply and procurement channel and inevitably influences the export channel. M$ has lots of other directions to go in but Apple is a marketing company pushing an overpriced fashion fad, this sort of thing can have a real impact on that 'marketing cache'

    • Not sure how much it makes sense to ban Apple, then, as opposed to Microsoft, considering that at least a portion of Apple products are open source [apple.com]

      • but, hi, there's something called Android that's well over 90% permissively licensed.

        • Android is a linux distribution put together by Google, with Google extensions and optimizations. Not sure with that has to do with the argument that Microsoft is less open source than Apple and was not "banned" from government procurement, therefore the motivation for China's action is probably not open sourc-y-ness.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    It isn't really that interesting when you consider the snowden leaks and our turn about with huwaei and zte in regards to US government infrastructure.

  • Once they get it, all will be forgotten
  • Nonsense (Score:5, Insightful)

    by xfizik (3491039) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:48PM (#47617669)
    "China seems to be on a mission to isolate itself from the world, at least in terms of technology."
    Why would they want to isolate themselves from the world? They may be looking to increase security (with the whole NSA mess, I wouldn't blame them) or trying to cut a better deal with Apple. There may be other rational reasons too.
    • Re:Nonsense (Score:5, Insightful)

      by steppin_razor_LA (236684) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:52PM (#47617705) Homepage Journal

      Agreed. The US refused to purchase equipment from Chinese technology companies because of security concerns. Now the tables have turned and we mock them for being isolationists?

    • I expect you're right... but actions like this could very well cause companies like Apple and Microsoft to start exploring other manufacturing options away from Foxconn.

      I know the camera makers and har drive manufacturers already have a significant presence in Thailand, so I can't imagine it would take much more than a willingness to invest sufficient capital in order to move iPhone manufacturing there.

      • Re:Nonsense (Score:5, Insightful)

        by mspohr (589790) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @06:26PM (#47618007)

        Apple and Microsoft (and most other corporations) pick manufacturing locations based on price and quality. They choose China because it offers the lowest cost and good quality. They aren't going to pick up and move (even if they could find another capable manufacturer) for political reasons.
        China is taking this step not to isolate themselves from the world but to isolate themselves from the NSA.

    • by AHuxley (892839)
      Carrying around, buying or installing another nations signals intelligence equipment is what most nations try to avoid.
      Recall GODSURGE, IRONCHEF, IRATEMONKEY, SOMBERKNAVE, VALIDATOR, OLYMPUS, COTTONMOUTH via ANT.
      http://cryptome.org/2014/01/ns... [cryptome.org]
      If you like a phone like device you have COTTONMOUTH, CANDYWIRE with some DROPOUTJEEP, TOTEGHOSTLY.
      Its not just the hardware as shipped or altered during shipment. Staff turn off a cell phone at a site and then turn it on 'outside' again - even that is intere
  • by ebusinessmedia1 (561777) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:48PM (#47617671)

    China has always been controlled from the center. In past eras, China has had technological and exploration advantages over the West that were wiped out by intrusion and isolation commanded from China's locus of concentrated power - whether via emperors, or the current regime.

    Long run (maybe, even near-long-term) this does not bode well for China's prospects, because when one is sealed off from outside ideas and innovation, one will ultimately fall behind and adapt only in suboptimal ways. What results is a waste of social and intellectual capital.

    • by ttsai (135075)

      Long run (maybe, even near-long-term) this does not bode well for China's prospects, because when one is sealed off from outside ideas and innovation, one will ultimately fall behind and adapt only in suboptimal ways. What results is a waste of social and intellectual capital.

      China is only refusing to buy some foreign products. There is no policy of isolation. I imagine there will still be a great deal of reverse engineering and other data gathering activities (interpret that how you wish). So, the idea is to negatively impact competitors financially while at the same time benefiting from their innovations.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      you have no idea of what you are talking about. Refusing to use Apple or Microsoft product for Government use has nothing to do with isolation.

      Its a wise move and any country who doesnt lick the a$$ of the US should do the same ASAP

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Nice talking, only problem is it doesn't mean a thing. It is the US that is increasingly alienating everyone else in the globe, while still burying the heads in the sand and pretending they run the show. You are the ones that should worry about isolation, and better start to worry about that FAST.

    • by misosoup7 (1673306) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @07:39PM (#47618427)

      China has always been controlled from the center. In past eras, China has had technological and exploration advantages over the West that were wiped out by intrusion and isolation commanded from China's locus of concentrated power - whether via emperors, or the current regime.

      Long run (maybe, even near-long-term) this does not bode well for China's prospects, because when one is sealed off from outside ideas and innovation, one will ultimately fall behind and adapt only in suboptimal ways. What results is a waste of social and intellectual capital.

      That makes no sense. China just banned its government from using Apple products, not Apple products in general. It hasn't sealed itself from outside ideas and innovations at all. Chinese citizens can still buy iPads and iPhones so Chinese smartphone manufactures still has to compete.

      Another reason why this may have happened that most people probably wouldn't think about is that this might be a move to fight corruption. iPads and iPhones have been vastly popular as "gifts" within the government. Banning the government from purchasing them as gifts would help to fight some of the corruption problem they're having.

      • Thank you for realizing the corruption problem. I'm pretty sure governmental workers don't have a need for a "work iPad", and it's pretty awkward doing the maintenance/change management when you have a fleet of PCs and then this department gets a bunch of Macs.

        Also I thought that on Slashdot we blame Apple for making expensive crap anyway, at which point not buying them would be wise buying policies for a government... ;)
    • by jandersen (462034)

      China has always been controlled from the center. In past eras, China has had technological and exploration advantages over the West that were wiped out by intrusion and isolation commanded from China's locus of concentrated power - whether via emperors, or the current regime.

      Long run (maybe, even near-long-term) this does not bode well for China's prospects, because when one is sealed off from outside ideas and innovation, one will ultimately fall behind and adapt only in suboptimal ways. What results is a waste of social and intellectual capital.

      Yes, the good old myths that I used to read about in the 70s, 80s, 90s, ... - and which have been promoted ever since the days of the British Empire. It's a load of nonsense, basically; racism dressed up with cheap self-flattery: 'Us in the West are much better because of "freedom" or "democracy" or whatever'.

      History shows us that China, like all other, great civilisations go through periods of progress and stagnation. Right now they are progressing at a staggering pace, while we are beginning to lag behind

  • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @05:55PM (#47617743)

    Since this only affects government purchases, we'd have to know whether a significant part of last quarter's Chinese sales involved government entities purchasing these products.

    I'd expect government sales - especially to China - aren't a huge part of Apple's business.

    • by thieh (3654731)
      Imagine you can't bring apple devices into your local government-operated buildings like library or DMV. That will be enough to make the hit huge because nobody wants to have that kind of inconvenience. Yet in a place where human rights is restricted, that is a totally forseeable development.
  • So lets get this right...China are investigating Microsoft for antitrust, and outright banning of Apple. Time is right and MIPS64 is looking ever so attractive.

    • So lets get this right...China are investigating Microsoft for antitrust, and outright banning of Apple. Time is right and MIPS64 is looking ever so attractive.

      You got that wrong. Some Apple products cannot be purchased for government use. All the Chinese people are free to buy iPhones, iPads and Macs for their own private use, or for business use. Just not inside the government. Well, the German government is said to be looking at mechanical typewriters for some purposes...

  • Good news everyone...
  • ...productivity in Chinese government offices rise sharply.

  • by CaptainDork (3678879) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @07:35PM (#47618409)

    "China seems to be on a mission to isolate itself from the world, at least in terms of technology."

    They didn't say that. They said they don't want GUBMINT to use APPLE stuff. That doesn't shut down China's entire technology capability.

    There are other people in China.

  • by MikeMo (521697) on Wednesday August 06, 2014 @07:52PM (#47618539)
    China has not banned any Apple products. Some were not included in the "green" catalog because Apple failed to submit data [macdailynews.com].
  • I mean, isn't all of Apples shit made in China anyway? That would be like the US government banning GM cars.
    • by mjwx (966435)

      That would be like the US government banning GM cars.

      The efficiency and reliability of the US Government fleet would increase whilst costs reduce?

  • It should be way easier for the US to conduct electronic espionage
  • I'm sure government purchases are a small fraction of the total purchased by the general public.

    There are many government agencies around the world which haven't approved Apple, Microsoft, Blackberry, or other particular products for their purchase lists. Government purchases are just a nice feather in the cap for most companies. They really could care less, other than some people amongst the general public who think government purchase approval is some sort of "security approval" for a device.

    They w

  • Xiaomi top seller in China [slashdot.org]

    I'm not saying it's 100% Xiaomi, but I'm sure it's somewhat related. Not even "hey we need to have Xiaomi #1" as much as "we need to have local tech #1".

  • "China seems to be on a mission to isolate itself from the NSA, at least in terms of technology. FTFY ;-)

Help stamp out Mickey-Mouse computer interfaces -- Menus are for Restaurants!

Working...