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Apple WWDC 2014: Tim Cook Unveils Yosemite 411

Posted by samzenpus
from the latest-and-greatest dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) has started, and OS X 10.10, officially named Yosemite, and iOS 8 have been officially unveiled. Craig Federighi, senior vice president of software engineering, also highlighted iCloud Drive. Although a little late to the party, Apple hopes to compete with the likes of Dropbox and Google Drive."
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Apple WWDC 2014: Tim Cook Unveils Yosemite

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 02, 2014 @03:14PM (#47148605)

    I've just finished watching this. There were so many new features introduced that I have no idea how other companies are going to compete with this. I bet that one year in the future, they won't have even 25% of those features matched.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by tuppe666 (904118)

      I've just finished watching this. There were so many new features introduced that I have no idea how other companies are going to compete with this. I bet that one year in the future, they won't have even 25% of those features matched.

      I can only imagine this is sarcasm, many of these features are 8 years old or more on competing platforms. Widgets; Transparency, Cloud integration, (Real) Cross Platform tools (not single Platform, and updated mail and browser application oooh. those are the broad stokes...Look over there they now use Bing, Microsoft outbidded Google Apple users will be so happy.

      • by jovius (974690) on Monday June 02, 2014 @04:04PM (#47149105)

        Apple's strategy is not no overwhelm, but to keep the users on an IV drip. And it works; they seem to listen. It stirs up emotions from side to side. It keeps the old users using the products. And more and more it becomes easier for the users of the other platforms to make a switch. Just when the same features have grown old Apple introduces them with their own extra twist and as a companions of their design. There's nothing wrong with that, and judging from the bottom line many of those features were not profitably executed.

        Anyway it's not about the OS anymore, because anybody is able to seamlessly mix operating systems and their native applications together now. It's about the experience and the integration.

    • by NotDrWho (3543773)

      I almost came in my pants watching it. But then, I have a very specific GUI improvement fetish that most (especially YOU, Dr. Swartz!) just don't understand.

  • It's about time (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    The current implementation of iCloud is terrible.
     
    And Slashdot Beta still sucks.

  • by bradrum (1639141) on Monday June 02, 2014 @03:19PM (#47148647)

    I am tired of this every year release cycle. Wish they would take a couple of years and swing for the fences on their software.

    • Its Killer Feature (Score:4, Insightful)

      by tuppe666 (904118) on Monday June 02, 2014 @03:34PM (#47148815)

      I am tired of this every year release cycle. Wish they would take a couple of years and swing for the fences on their software.

      Actually I love the idea of regular releases...and free ones too. Ignoring my slights in my other posts the fact that upgrades are free and regular, makes overpriced Apple hardware seem a little more affordable...If I was a new Apple phone user, and found I liked a lot there...and there is a lot to like, I would be tempted to Migrate to a shiny machine...Although you would have to claw Linux running on commodity hardware out of my bleeding hands first.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        until recently the upgrades haven't been free, they brake compatibility too often.

        as the admin of a mac shop, i am constantly plauged by building working images for our corporate tools then finding when i go to get new hardware to replace damaged machines or accomodate new users, barely even older version of os x can't be installed on the newer hardware and you can count on apple not to release stand alone drivers.

        I used to love Apple, then i was forced to work with them they're fun toys but terrible tools

      • by bradrum (1639141)

        I like the idea of free regular releases too. But the reality is that they don't seem to be able to break much technical ground with these. Like moving to ZFS or integrating virtual reality (kinda serious) .

        • I like the idea of free regular releases too. But the reality is that they don't seem to be able to break much technical ground with these. Like moving to ZFS or integrating virtual reality (kinda serious) .

          Yes...but it allows those same large features to be rolled out sooner...regressions fixed...blah blah blah. In reality many programs are rolled out several times a year. Safari got a massive improvement this release(it had the largest share of news)...firefox/chrome will simply carry on adding features and releasing several times this year.

        • by Yaztromo (655250) <`yaztromo' `at' `mac.com'> on Monday June 02, 2014 @04:54PM (#47149569) Homepage Journal

          I like the idea of free regular releases too. But the reality is that they don't seem to be able to break much technical ground with these. Like moving to ZFS or integrating virtual reality (kinda serious) .

          While it is disappointing that their push towards ZFS fizzled and died, OS X 10.9 did make some serious technical improvements under the hood that go well beyond the competition.

          Compressing and decompressing memory pages on the fly being one of them. It's a much (much!) faster operation than paging to disk, and can significantly reduce memory pressure. Many users felt like they had received a free hardware upgrade -- it can be pretty dramatic. AFAIK neither Windows or Linux have transparent page compression like this. Timer coalescing was another significant kernel-level improvement (although certainly one that had been done before on other platforms). App Nap makes some significant adjustments to how threads and processes are allotted compute cycles. The overall effect can be significantly lessened power requirements, particularly on Apple's laptops, leading to increased battery life -- something no other OS vendor that I'm aware of is focussing on in the PC space (mobile being a bit of a different story, of course).

          Perhaps not whiz-bang flashy stuff that end users notice first, but some pretty solid under-the-hood technology none-the-less.

          Yaz

          • Do you know C? Any desire to implement such a feature in Linux? Seems like a good idea, and your claim of dramatic performance improvement has got me thinking. Perhaps this would be a good way to dip my toes into kernel hacking, and perhaps I'm not the only one thinking that.
            • by Yaztromo (655250) <`yaztromo' `at' `mac.com'> on Monday June 02, 2014 @05:49PM (#47150029) Homepage Journal

              Do you know C? Any desire to implement such a feature in Linux? Seems like a good idea, and your claim of dramatic performance improvement has got me thinking. Perhaps this would be a good way to dip my toes into kernel hacking, and perhaps I'm not the only one thinking that.

              Yup -- I even wrote an experimental real-time kernel for the Atmel AT90 a few years back.

              To be honest, I have considered it, as I'm also a Linux user (OS X makes a fantastic interface into a bunch of headless Linux servers that do the grunt work around here), and I'd love to have this support there as well. I currently have 285 processes running on my iMac, and while I'm not really putting a lot of memory pressure on the system (7.97GB used out of 8GB, with only 8.76GB of virtual memory active and no swap), however OS X has still managed to compress 395.6MB of memory, and I haven't noticed a thing. Indeed, it's probably saved me from having to page to disk at the moment to the tune of roughly 200MB. That's a lot of pages available for use pretty quickly without the need to load them from disk first.

              What's stopping me? Time. I used to do a lot of Open Source software development, and have had a few projects of my own over the years that have seen some moderate success, and would like to contribute more to the community -- but that was before I had a wife, and before we had a child who has a lot of medical needs. After a long day of commercial application development, and driving my daughter from one appointment to another six days a week, my hobbies currently reflect my desire to get out from behind the keyboard and do things outdoors.

              I lament that things have gone this way -- there's nothing more I'd love than to do some deeper research on the type of compression algorithms Apple is using in their memory compression scheme (WKdm [apple.com], re-implement it as part of the Linux kernel, look at algorithms to quickly identify candidates for compression, and all that good stuff. I get giddy just thinking about it -- but the last thing I need on my plate right now is another project.

              If someone decides to take this up, they have my moral support. Maybe in a few years I can start working on interesting stuff like this again, but right now it would probably burn me out to take on something of this size.

              Yaz

    • Multi-year release schedules make for big changes but don't allow you to check back with your users that they are happy with the direction.

      e.g. Windows Vista - 6 years. People hated it.
      Windows 7 - 2 years. Better than Vista.
      Windows 8 - 3 years. People hated it.
      Windows 8.1 - 1 year. Significant improvements on Windows 8.

    • by ganjadude (952775)
      I actually prefer it over the windows release method of every few years dropping a steaming pile on us, than taking incremental updates to fix what they broke
  • Yosemite (Score:2, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Confusion with the Blue & White G3 codename in 3... 2... 1...

    • Re:Yosemite (Score:5, Insightful)

      by kthreadd (1558445) on Monday June 02, 2014 @03:26PM (#47148737)

      I don't think that's going to be a problem. 99+ % of Mac users probably have no idea what a blue and white G3 is, and the rest knows enough to differentiate the two.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Think about it less in terms of people and more in terms of what a search engine will find for you.

        Right now, when I type in "yosemite mac" into a Google search, I get 4 news stories from today's WWDC and the fifth match is the "Power Macintosh G3 (Blue & White)" Wikipedia page. In a few hours, those WWDC news articles will fade. Fast forward to 18 months from now, and you will get an unholy mish-mash of results from that somewhat ambiguous search term.

        Apple will probably regret this name overlap, if no

        • by Shadowmist (57488)

          Think about it less in terms of people and more in terms of what a search engine will find for you.

          Right now, when I type in "yosemite mac" into a Google search, I get 4 news stories from today's WWDC and the fifth match is the "Power Macintosh G3 (Blue & White)" Wikipedia page. In a few hours, those WWDC news articles will fade. Fast forward to 18 months from now, and you will get an unholy mish-mash of results from that somewhat ambiguous search term.

          Apple will probably regret this name overlap, if not at the top of the organization, then at the bottom where they have to deal with customer service as a daily concern. I can just picture someone at the Apple store saying "I did some research on Google and these new Yosemite Macs won't run anything past 10.3! But you're selling 10.10 right next to them! You're ripping me off! I'm clueless!" (Maybe that last part wouldn't be out loud, but it would certainly be understood.)

          Not knowing the difference in a mix of search results is exactly the problem.

          What you're not taking into account is that people will be talking, blogging, flaming, etc about OS X Yosemitie from now until the next decade. That's certainly going to push it far above any posts about a machine that's been out of production for almost two decades now.

      • Forget code names, they did it with an actual software title with AppleWorks for the Mac and AppleWorks for the Apple ][. Somehow, we survived.

  • by eminencja (1368047) on Monday June 02, 2014 @03:23PM (#47148687)
    Yosemite will feature a new icon set. A bigger news is Swift, a new, safe programming language with type inference. Anyone who is able to find a language reference manual (supposedly available on iBooks) will get a lot of mod points.
    • Swift and its replacement for OpenGL a great but different topic. I am not sure yet why platform specific tools will make a difference when cross platform...is the new platform, especially when Android is now the worlds number one platform after unseating Windows last year, and chasm between it and iOS is set to grow. Personally I'm waiting for the news of proprietary extensions certain BSD codebases by Apple...again, with the inevitable defending by fruit lovers.

      • Re:Off-topic Maybe (Score:4, Insightful)

        by bradrum (1639141) on Monday June 02, 2014 @03:34PM (#47148825)

        As someone who has worked on several cross platform toolkits I can say that

        "cross platform...is the new platform" == marketing bullshit

        • by jythie (914043)
          In a way, it is almost preferable that they start taking away the illusion of cross platform tools and be honest about it.
          • Qt (Score:5, Informative)

            by fyngyrz (762201) on Monday June 02, 2014 @04:27PM (#47149293) Homepage Journal

            It's not that much of an illusion. Qt's done some useful work there. I've written one app, quite complex, that runs under both Windows and OSX. The only serious work I had to do was related to USB support, which Qt really hasn't addressed worth a darn. Everything else, though, is just a recompile specifying the target. Sound, networking, file system, GUI and lower level graphics, etc. The apps are a little less efficient, working as they must through a compatibility layer, but they're efficient enough to do the job at hand on even moderately recent hardware, so I'm pretty happy with the whole approach.

        • "cross platform...is the new platform" == marketing bullshit

          I have been playing https://www.humblebundle.com/ [humblebundle.com] Humble Bundle PC and Android...are all those games available on iOS too, can you install them? At least you can still run them on OS X for now.

          Seriously 10 or as fruit lovers say X

          • For the latest HumbleBundle, they choose some games that were available on both PC and Android.

            If instead you wanted to make a different list of games that are available on PC and iOS, you could easily do so.

            Thus the games in the HumbleBundle say precisely nothing about cross-compatibility. It does say something about the business model of HumbleBundle though.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by larry bagina (561269)
          Cross platform is wearing three condoms and then butt fucking, to abstract away the differences between men and women. It's usually a shitty experience for the user (though some people seem to prefer it).
      • If the numbers shown in the Keynote are true, only 10% of Android users run Kit Kat. Most users are stuck with versions that are three or four years old. Given that software updates are sometimes controlled by the cellphone companies, it's not a good situation either for those users.

        And telling them to "install cyanogenmod" will get you blank stares. A phone is just a tool for most people, not something to mess around with.

        • Doesn't matter so much any more. ~99% of active (in use) android devices run v2.3 or above and so get the latest version of Google play services, updated every few weeks (not once a year). Google seems to be pointing developers to target the play services API's in place of newer OS level API's.
          • Google seems to be pointing developers to target the play services API's in place of newer OS level API's.

            You say this as if it were a good thing, but it isn't.

        • by ganjadude (952775)
          its not even that, its that SOME phones still "just work" with older versions without issues where putting the new version on it would cripple it, be it lag or battery drain due to the hardware. I would much rather have a tablet or phone that still work fairly well even if its dated (I have an ipod touch first gen still working, as well as android tablets on 2.4 4.0 and kitkat) Each device does its job just fine.

          Now on the other hand all my friends with iphones generally complain when the 2nd update roll
          • by mattack2 (1165421)

            Installing an iOS upgrade is optional for the user. It is not updated without the user's consent.

      • by mean pun (717227)

        Why do you think Swift is platform specific? I think it is will almost certainly not be; Apple will be more interested in getting the new language adopted rather than locking in people. Therefore at least the core language is very likely to be neutral. In fact, there is a pretty good chance it will be available through the llvm channels, and have a BSD license.

        Metal is more likely to be platform specific because the goal is to give more direct access to the hardware.

        • Re:Off-topic Maybe (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Carewolf (581105) on Monday June 02, 2014 @04:46PM (#47149497) Homepage

          Why do you think Swift is platform specific? I think it is will almost certainly not be; Apple will be more interested in getting the new language adopted rather than locking in people. Therefore at least the core language is very likely to be neutral. In fact, there is a pretty good chance it will be available through the llvm channels, and have a BSD license.

          Objective-C is not technically platform specific either, it just is in practice, because there is no room or reason for yet another wannabe C++-killer. There are already plenty of languages better than C++, another one wont make a difference, so Swift will be like Objective-C, Apple only.

          • "Yet another wannabe C++ killer"? You say that like Objective-C is some new kid on the block that is out gunning for C++. Neither of those is true - Objective-C has been around as long as C++ and nobody is trying to use it to take out C++. In fact, they work together quite well (even in the same source files) should you need to do so. I do agree that Swift will probably ultimately be Apple-only, but that's the status quo with Objective-C and doesn't seem to have caused a serious lack of developer attention
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Apple Developer Page - https://developer.apple.com/swift/
        Welcome to Swift (Guides and Reference) - https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/welcome_to_swift
        The Swift Programming Language (iBooks Store) - https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-swift-programming-language/id881256329?mt=11

      • It's time for Apple to move on to a new language, as Objective-C bears the marks of having evolved over many years, and still suffers from many of the design snafus of C.

        Yet whatever language they move to must be completely compatible with Objective-C, such that the existing libraries still work, and existing projects can simply add new classes in the new language and keep the existing stuff in Obj-C.

        On top of that there are various design patterns that Apple uses and recommend, that are fully supported in

      • I am not sure yet why platform specific tools will make a difference when cross platform...is the new platform, especially when Android is now the worlds number one platform after unseating Windows last year, and chasm between it and iOS is set to grow.

        Sigh. One of the complaints about learning to code for OS X and iOS was that a developer had to learn Objective-C to use Cocoa especially after Carbon (and hence Java) was deprecated. Swift seems to be a much easier to language to use. How much of it will actually be easier to use, developers will find out when they start to use it.

        Personally I'm waiting for the news of proprietary extensions certain BSD codebases by Apple...again, with the inevitable defending by fruit lovers.

        The BSD license allows this. Get over it. Especially since the BSD license means that Apple has no obligation to release any source code. Yet they release Darwin year after y

    • by astrokid (779104) on Monday June 02, 2014 @03:35PM (#47148835)
      Swift Language Guide was uploaded recently @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/swift-programming-language/id881256329 [apple.com]
      • Any idea how to download it without iTunes?

      • And it is pretty bad. All the good features of the language seem to be taken almost verbatim from Scala, Kotlin and other forerunners. On the other hand, they still manage to fuck things up. Let me just quote parts of the language guide:

        "Immutability has a slightly different meaning for arrays, however. You are still not allowed to perform any action that has the potential to change the size of an immutable array, but you are allowed to set a new value for an existing index in the array. This enables Swift

    • by MouseR (3264)

      Will be available today but App Store not updated for the Swift manual.

      XCode6 preview includes a syntactical guide (probably the same as what will be on iBooks).

      10 minutes into it and I cringe at a specific feature:

      Support for any unicode glyphs as variable/function names. Down to emoticons.

      That will bode well when I need to use altavista to translate the chinese sources into something I can read.

      • Support for any unicode glyphs as variable/function names. Down to emoticons.

        Just because it's possible doesn't mean that people generally will. XML tag names allow pretty much any Unicode character that wouldn't cause a parsing error, or would be impossible to distinguish. But people don't generally use emoticons as tag names.

    • by TechyImmigrant (175943) on Monday June 02, 2014 @04:41PM (#47149447) Journal

      >A bigger news is Swift, a new, safe programming language with type inference.

      I just took a quick look through the swift language manual on iBooks.
      I like it. It seems to lose some of the annoying features of objective-c and bring in some of the nice features of python.

      E.G. for i in 0..3 { stuff }; or: for i in list_of_things { stuff }; like python.
      and tuples allowing multiple return values, like in python
      and it gets rid of the annoying square bracket method call syntax of objective C, replacing it with normal dot notation. classinstance.methodname()
      and passing functions as arguments like fancy languages
      and getting rid of the need for semicolons, like python
      and type inference from literals in variable declarations.

  • Prediction (Score:5, Funny)

    by njnnja (2833511) on Monday June 02, 2014 @03:24PM (#47148707)

    I'm not sure which of these technologies will be successful in the coming months, but I am certain that before the year is over we will see many job postings requiring 3 years experience with Swift.

  • by marsu_k (701360) on Monday June 02, 2014 @03:25PM (#47148717)
    I usually like to think that the physical reality we live in is much more interesting than the supernatural world some people seem to live in. However, I have a precognition. Within seconds, we'll have SuperKendall and BasilBrush telling us how iCloud Drive is much superior to the current offerings. Coming in 3, 2, 1...
  • by Animats (122034) on Monday June 02, 2014 @03:31PM (#47148783) Homepage

    Kind of a "meh" series of announcements. The Mac interface will look more like the phone interface. (How'd that work out for Microsoft?) FTP that goes through Apple's servers. A new GUI theme. Some other routine GUI churn. A medical interface app with sensors. That's it?

    Last week, Apple execs were promising big announcements, the biggest since the Jobs era. This is all they've got? From the hype, you'd expect a competitor for Google Glass, or a VR system, or a rugged phone with no connectors and inductive charging, or an AI system that runs your life, or NSA-proof security, or something really new, like a direct brain interface or displays in contact lenses.

    • Congratulations, you've fallen into the trap that so many other techies here at /. have in thinking that this is consumer stuff targeted at YOU.

      It isn't.

      The people that this is aimed at don't even know what you're talking about when you say 'FTP'. They just want to move their files around easily and transparently. Now they can. They'll like that.

      Take a look at the actual tech stuff if you want to gripe or be excited. But the consumer facing stuff will be really interesting to consumers. They like a bit of GUI change as long as it's not too drastic. (Apple isn't moving the buttons or anything, they're just making a few things more accessible and modifying the design a little; this isn't near the magnitude of the change to the Windows Desktop OS.)

      Apple is very good at selling things to people. For non-essential goods, there is basically no company on the planet that's better at making money from consumers. What is small potatoes to you is a big upgrade to some. And it's free. That tends to smooth out any rough edges that crop up.

    • by sootman (158191) on Monday June 02, 2014 @04:41PM (#47149451) Homepage Journal

      > Last week, Apple execs were promising big announcements, the biggest since the Jobs era.

      Citation needed. What *I* heard the execs saying [recode.net] was that they're going to have great products this year. They have 7 months left.

      And FFS, this is the DEVELOPER conference. New product announcements here are few and far between. Here's an overview of the last ten years of WWDC. [technologizer.com] If you can read that list and still be surprised or disappointed at what was or wasn't announced today, you're an idiot.

    • by nine-times (778537) <nine.times@gmail.com> on Monday June 02, 2014 @05:03PM (#47149643) Homepage

      The Mac interface will look more like the phone interface. (How'd that work out for Microsoft?)

      Well it *looks* more like their phone interface, largely in that it uses a simplified and more "flat" design. Microsoft's problem was that they tried to make their new interface *behave* like their phone interface.

      FTP that goes through Apple's servers.

      Well it's more like a Dropbox competitor, I believe, but with better hooks into the OS for both the desktop and phone. That still might be unimpressive, but it's not the same as a FTP.

      Last week, Apple execs were promising big announcements, the biggest since the Jobs era.

      Were they definitely talking about this conference, or were they just saying that they have major things in the pipeline? I'm honestly asking, because I didn't see the quotes you're talking about, and they apparently still have new iPhone/iPad models to announce, as well as the rumored smartwatch. Also, some of their products (e.g. Mac minis) should be receiving updates soon, and it's possible there are redesigns coming. I wouldn't be surprised to see a new thinner 4K Thunderbolt display soon.

      From the hype, you'd expect a competitor for Google Glass, or a VR system, or a rugged phone with no connectors and inductive charging, or an AI system that runs your life...

      So your idea of "innovating" and "groundbreaking" is a me-too Google Glass product, or inductive charging? That stuff actually doesn't sound innovative to me at all. If you really want inductive charging, you can get a case for that, but I think most people have found that it's not all it's cracked up to be. But an AI that runs your life-- their new home automation stuff, in combination with Siri, edges slightly closer to that kind of thing. Real AI is still a ways out, and I'd expect it to come in small incremental changes instead of a fully fledged AI being announced all at once.

      Meanwhile, Apple has announced health monitoring and home automation. They've announced a new programming language. They've announced various incremental improvements throughout their software lineup. Also interesting, though not unprecedented, is the "Mail Drop" feature, which will automatically throw files onto their "iCloud Drive" Dropbox competitor and include a link to that file in lieu of email attachments. But what I find most interesting is the description of the "Continuity" interaction between various Apple devices-- that your iPhone, iPad, and Mac might all start talking to each other in a more seamless way, allowing you to access the resources of each device from the other devices.

    • It's a developer conference. A new language as a first-class component of the platform is huge news.

  • So the ability for one app to provide extensions that other apps can use to render specialized content?

    Flash support in 3..2..1...

    • Nah, Apple doesn't like Flash.

      I think they've just invented something...let's call it the Component Object Model. Next release we'll get Object Linking and Embedding. I'm sure Microsoft couldn't innovate that!

  • by Sir Holo (531007) on Monday June 02, 2014 @03:59PM (#47149059)

    FTSummary: ...also highlighted iCloud Drive. Although a little late to the party, Apple hopes to compete with the likes of Dropbox and Google Drive.

    DropBox will drop its pants for the NSA any time, anywhere, with no FISA court order required. Apple, not so much.

    • Urm...

      “DROPOUT JEEP is a software implant for the Apple iPhone that utilizes modular mission applications to provide specific SIGINT functionality. This functionality includes the ability to remotely push/pull files from the device. SMS retrieval, contact list retrieval, voicemail, geolocation, hot mic, camera capture, cell tower location, etc. Command, control and data exfiltration can occur over SMS messaging or a GPRS data connection. All communications with the implant will be covert and encrypted

  • mac mini still almost 2 years old at same price and hardware.

    • by creepynut (933825)

      I'm surprised they didn't update it (maybe even give it a modest price drop). With all the negative press Windows 8 has been receiving, Apple could market the Mac Mini as a "drop in" replacement for people who currently have a Windows 8 tower at home.

  • So is this Apple's answer to Vegemite? Definitely a bold move from Mr. Cook.
  • Is there ever going to be an OS 11? OS XI?

    No? Why not?

  • Is 10.10 just a re-release of 10.1 with a 0 tacked on the end? Will version 10.11 be between 10.1 and 10.2?
  • The updates seem unspectacular, but they're not neccesarly bad. The Flat UI look is a matter of taste, that's for sure ... and they've kept the green button, the only thing on the inmediate apple UI with no predictable behaviour what-so-ever ... seriously, I'm wondering why MS hasn't been making jokes about this during the last decade.

    However, this Swift PL thing might just be something that turns out in Apples favor. The barrier of entry to native apps probably has been there for some people, and they prob

    • No one is forcing anyone to upgrade and I certainly won't until Yosemite or a successor to it is well established. In my experience apple systems are among those that keep their value the longest without an update.

      Hear hear!

      I tend to subscribe to "The Star Trek Theory"--namely, the even numbered ones are the good ones. My laptop runs 10.8 quite happily, I still get updates for Xcode, Safari, and the like. I haven't been "abandoned" by developers.

      So with 10.10 coming along, I'll probably wait 'til after the first bug-fix release or until Apple stops sending out Xcode updates for it (whichever comes first) and then switch to 10.10.

  • Metal (Score:4, Interesting)

    by nneonneo (911150) <spam_hole@s h a w.ca> on Tuesday June 03, 2014 @12:31AM (#47152395) Homepage

    One of the updates that folks seem to have overlooked is Metal, Apple's upcoming replacement for OpenGL.

    While I think Apple is likely to continue supporting OpenGL for the foreseeable future, it's somewhat worrying that they've decided to just build a brand-new graphics library. It represents a refocusing of their optimization efforts, certainly, so in the future I would expect devs to have to use Metal in order to obtain decent graphics performance. This in turn will make development even harder, especially for cross-platform shops which expect OpenGL to work reasonably well in all environments...

It seems that more and more mathematicians are using a new, high level language named "research student".

Working...