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OS X Operating Systems Upgrades Apple

Inside OS X Mavericks 362

Posted by samzenpus
from the take-a-good-look dept.
rjmarvin writes "Apple's era of naming OSs after big cats is over. The Mavericks wave is rolling in, and the first four developer previews have given an inside look at the cutting-edge OS. Users and developers have almost entirely positive things to say about Mavericks, from faster speed and improved stability to new features like iBooks and iCloud keychains. While some installation concerns and errors have arisen, developer preview have improved version by version, and Mavericks is looking good."
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Inside OS X Mavericks

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  • Parallels (Score:2, Offtopic)

    by Neo-Rio-101 (700494)

    Parallels briefly mentioned Parallels desktop 9 was available in their spam window, but it's not shown on their website.

    • by aaarrrgggh (9205)

      So happy I switched to VMware. It seemed like parallels was constantly breaking to force upgrades only for revenue stream; it felt like the late 90's all over again...

      • Re:Parallels (Score:5, Informative)

        by TheRaven64 (641858) on Friday August 30, 2013 @03:34AM (#44714505) Journal
        I bought Parallels 2. It contained a bug in their handling of IPIs that caused host kernel panics on Core 2 processors (i.e. the processor that I'd bought to run it on). They eventually found the bug and fixed it... in Parallels 3. Their solution to the problem of selling me a product that was not fit for purpose was for me to give them more money. I switched to VirtualBox and will never give that company money again. VirtualBox lacks a few of the nice things in VMWare (in particular, it wires all of the VM's memory and doesn't do deduplication), but it's quite useable.
        • VirtualBox is also a bit easier to install in Ubuntu.
        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          Have you ever got virtualbox's 3d support to work? Every time I try, virtualbox crashes. This is why I'm still using vmware player, where it almost always works now (was still kind of flaky in 3, pretty good in 4, pretty great in 5.)

      • by azav (469988)

        Same here. I run every new version of the Mac OS in VMware and boot from 10.6.8 which sucks so much less than the new OSes.

  • AirDrop (Score:4, Interesting)

    by exomondo (1725132) on Thursday August 29, 2013 @11:30PM (#44713627)
    Anybody know is OSX Mavericks AirDrop compatible with iOS7 AirDrop? I know Mountain Lion's isn't.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    They better hope Dr. Light doesn't work for Microsoft.

  • Spam nonsense (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 29, 2013 @11:41PM (#44713661)

    Alleged "article" is zero information and all noise. Read at your own risk of brain damage.

  • by zedrdave (1978512) on Thursday August 29, 2013 @11:42PM (#44713665)
    From the article:

    > He concluded by mentioning that he hoped Mavericks would serve as the bridge between OS X and iOS, allowing his company to make Mac versions of its iOS titles.

    So basically this guy is happy that OS X is bridging closer to iOS (because his business stands to gain from this).

    How exactly is that supposed to warm my heart as a user who already thoroughly loath the very idea of the "Natural Scrolling(tm)" option on previous updates?

    Is it too much to ask for them simply not to break anything and leave me with the halfway-decent UI to a powerful *nix that I am happily using?
    • by Optimal Cynic (2886377) on Thursday August 29, 2013 @11:47PM (#44713685)
      That's why I'm still on Snow Leopard. Sigh.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Why? What change have they introduced to improve iOS compatibility that you can't just ignore if you don't like it?

        The OS X desktop and interface have not changed much at all.

        The scrolling, which is a vast improvement for many, you can turn off. Autohide scrollbars, again a godsend for many users, you can turn off. Everything else, you can just not use.

        • by dfghjk (711126) on Friday August 30, 2013 @06:10AM (#44715011)

          "The scrolling, which is a vast improvement for many, ... Autohide scrollbars, again a godsend for many users,..."

          Ridiculous hyperbole and utterly false. Things worked the way they did for a reason. The changes suit an agenda, they aren't a "vast improvement" or a "godsend" to any user. They couldn't be regardless of merit.

          • by ImdatS (958642) on Friday August 30, 2013 @06:58AM (#44715187) Homepage

            Why is that hyperbole? I used to work on HP machines a long time ago (when they were running some HP-owned BASIC) and I loved the natural scrolling. It took some time get used to used, but I preferred it over the "non-natural" on all other machines.

            Autohide scrollbars is also nice to have, though I'm not religious about that one - scrollbars just use up precious screen estate. Especially when using two-finger scrolling on touch pads, I don't really need to see the scrollbars all the time.

            No, not an Apple fanboy - there is enough to criticize and I usually criticize Apple a lot - but not for these features, that you can actually turn OFF.

            • If I scroll on my mac right now, the place where the scrollbar goes does not change size at all, merely a long oval appears in the 'bezel'. If it doesnt change the size of the window WHY CANT I HAVE THE SCROLL MARKER IN IT AT ALL TIMES THAT CAN BE GRABBED BY THE MOUSE?
              • by Zaurus (674150)
                Does "System Preferences > General > Show scroll bars: > Always" not work for you? My scroll bars seem to stay put with that option on.
      • by jersey_emt (846314) on Friday August 30, 2013 @02:15AM (#44714211) Homepage
        You can switch the mouse scrolling to normal in System Preferences.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by NJRoadfan (1254248)
        Snow Leopard is slowly becoming the XP of Macs. You aren't alone. Too bad Apple still artificially limits what OSes run on their machines despite being standard x86 hardware underneath.
    • Is it too much to ask for them simply not to break anything

      Yeah, this is unfortunately a very serious worry with OSX......

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by lxs (131946)

      Yup. Apple is following Microsoft for a change. Not only in tabletifying their OS but also in their naming of it.
      I remember Jobs way back in the cat era poking fun at Vista's pre production name "Longhorn" and now they name their own OS "Mavericks" which as every QI watcher knows was originally a term describing unbranded cattle.

      So is this all a hidden homage to Tucows [wikipedia.org] or a comment on how they see their customers?

      • by tlhIngan (30335)

        I remember Jobs way back in the cat era poking fun at Vista's pre production name "Longhorn" and now they name their own OS "Mavericks" which as every QI watcher knows was originally a term describing unbranded cattle.

        Well, it's a Mac, so the appropriate animal is the Dogcow [wikipedia.org].

        OTOH, given they're moving to location names, Mavericks [wikipedia.org] is apparently a place for surfers. Unofficially, at that, so it's either a play on the stereotype of Californians, or Apple's OS names are going to be of obscure place names only k

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          No, the naming scheme is in reference to self-identified groupings of American politicians.

          Mavericks refers to John McCain and Sarah Palin, who considered themselves renegade "maverick" politicians unbeholden to traditional power structures.

          The next OS Release will be OS X "Wankers" featuring American politicians who went off the deep end with sexual and/or other humiliating exploits, ie. Spitzer, Weiner, and that Idaho guy soliciting gay sex in a gas station restroom.

          Look for OS X Teabaggers in 2015, featu

      • Yup. Apple is following Microsoft for a change. Not only in tabletifying their OS ...

        Even Snow Leopard had LaunchPad - and that was being sold in 2009. You almost never see it, though, because the tablet paradigm doesn't translate well to a computer... so no one chooses to use it.

      • by SuperKendall (25149) on Friday August 30, 2013 @01:48AM (#44714117)

        Yup. Apple is following Microsoft for a change. Not only in tabletifying their OS but also in their naming of it.

        I don't think that's at all true.

        Microsoft decided the tablet and the PC were exactly identical, and made one the other at the cost of both.

        Apple however, has said a number of times that PC and tablet/mobile OS's are different things, with different needs (and that desktops do not need touch screens, just gestures). While OSX may borrow at times from iOS, and also share frameworks in some cases, the way you use them and the abilities they have remain pretty different.

        Just the aspect of Mavericks adding on a lot of welcome additions to multiple screen use including multiple menu bars (something very un-tablet like indeed) indicates a strong separation - for the better.

      • ... and now they name their own OS "Mavericks" ...

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mavericks_(location) [wikipedia.org]

        "Longhorn" was announced about at the time when MacOS X 10.3 "Panther" was released. And panthers kill longhorn. Microsoft delayed delivery until after the release of 10.4 "Tiger". Tigers and longhorn don't live in the same place.

      • by Dogtanian (588974) on Friday August 30, 2013 @06:18AM (#44715031) Homepage

        I remember Jobs way back in the cat era poking fun at Vista's pre production name "Longhorn" and now they name their own OS "Mavericks" which as every QI watcher knows was originally a term describing unbranded cattle.

        They had no choice; if they'd kept up the feline naming scheme, the only one left was "OS X Domestic Cat".

        Which still would have been better than "Mavericks".

        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          Which still would have been better than "Mavericks".

          Well, if they're naming OSX releases after Santa Cruz surf spots, it stands to reason that the next one will be called "Steamers", which I think is an excellent name for an OSX release.

    • by SJ (13711) on Friday August 30, 2013 @12:39AM (#44713901)

      I hated... HATED... "Natural Scrolling" when it first came out. But I gave it a week. You push up on the trackpad... screen goes up. You push down, screen goes down. It just feels.. natural.

      Now when I use another computer the scrolling just feels weird.

      • by ecotax (303198) on Friday August 30, 2013 @05:10AM (#44714803)

        Same here.

        After being thoroughly conditioned to be used to think of scrolling as something you do by dragging the thumb of a scrollbar for many years, I decided to give this a chance nevertheless, knowing the brain can be pretty quick in 'rewiring' itself to changes like this. It's even possible to get used to seeing the world upside down within a few days: http://www.theguardian.com/education/2012/nov/12/improbable-research-seeing-upside-down [theguardian.com] - or maybe right side up, as the image on the retina is normally inverted.

        I now think of scrolling like: finger drags content up or down. Simple. No inbetween stuff like screens, mouses, trackpads, scrollbars - just my finger moving around content.

      • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

        It's like they reversed the up/down rotation on an aircraft or switched left-right steering in a car. Yeah, you can get used to it, but then whenever you use a non-Apple product it feels weird again.

        I would assume they did it because it's kinda skeudomorphic, as in you would push in that direction. Now they seem to be abandoning the skeudomorphic stuff in favour of a flat look it would make sense to go back to the normal way, but I doubt they will risk annoying everyone twice.

      • I hated... HATED... "Natural Scrolling" when it first came out. But I gave it a week. You push up on the trackpad... screen goes up. You push down, screen goes down. It just feels.. natural.

        I'm agnostic about it but since I have to use lots of machines that scroll the traditional way I don't really want to screw myself up. I could get used to either direction but I don't want to have to get used to both.

    • by Dog-Cow (21281)

      I hate natural scrolling too, but that's because I still use a mouse. Most Mac users are using touchpads (laptops), where it is more natural. And you can turn it off.

      • by ecotax (303198)

        Most Mac users are using touchpads (laptops), where it is more natural.

        And for the Mac users with a desktop, most of those will use Apple's Magic Mouse, the top of which is basically a trackpad.
        You can still scroll the old-fashioned way by doing mouse stuff in the scrollbar, but it's not what most people typically seem to using anymore.

    • It says it will enhance cloud integration and "all your passwords" can be in the cloud. Of course one can do that voluntarily now (lastpass etc) but it wigs me out a little. I recently bought a chrome book and when you fire it up you realize how when you commit to the cloud whole hog that there is some magic. It's like going back to the convenience of the thin client days but in a full modern way. But what I find frightening is that literally my whole life hinges on my google password. My computer, all

      • by exomondo (1725132)

        It says it will enhance cloud integration and "all your passwords" can be in the cloud.

        Just what I want, all my passwords in a bunch of data centers in various locations.

        • by smash (1351)
          Key word: "can". You have the option to NOT use icloud keychain sync, and it clearly asks you whether you want to. Been running mavericks since DP1. It's good.
      • by jbolden (176878)

        Take a look at your ~/Library/Mobile Documents/ directory. iCloud is like DropBox everything is still local.

  • OS X Upgrade Fear (Score:4, Insightful)

    by TheModelEskimo (968202) on Thursday August 29, 2013 @11:43PM (#44713667)
    I'm still on Lion. I have a 2011 MBP and I'm thinking I might stay on Lion. I'll be handing it down to my wife and would consider the big version upgrade, but my recent experience with iOS upgrades was that the new OS was way more resource-intensive than the old, even though people told me it'd be so great and Apple doesn't do upgrades that slow your machine down, etc. Thoughts? Should I think about an upgrade to Mavericks?
    • From what I've heard, Mountain Lion is a worthwhile upgrade to Lion.
      • From what I've heard, Mountain Lion is a worthwhile upgrade to Lion.

        Mountain Lion fixed Kerberos authentication, in any case - it was horribly borked in Lion. ML also handled Active Directory reasonably well.

        Not that most home users care about either one...

        • by Y-Crate (540566)

          I'd still love to know what fixes that "Kerberos 5 refuses you" thing you sometimes see in the Console when a user logs in.

          It's survived an OS reinstall and rebuilt user account.

    • by AHuxley (892839)
      If its supported and "battery-saving techniques" on page 3 work well on your hardware: Enjoy :)
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Neo-Rio-101 (700494)

      Easy.... just wait for the OSX dot 1 versions to come out before deciding. By the time the first minor update to the OS is out, early adopters and people who don't care if their Mac breaks horribly will let you know how it performs... plus most of the showstopper bugs will get ironed out by then.

    • Mavericks is a great upgrade for your machine.
      http://www.apple.com/osx/preview/advanced-technologies.html [apple.com]

      Mavericks has an app nap feature that automatically slows apps down that are completely hidden and a Safari Power Saver feature.

      Overall your machine will hopefully use LESS resources than it currently does with better performance for those apps your actually using (i.e. in the foreground).

    • by rho (6063)

      I have a late 2008 15" MBP on Mountain Lion. It's fine.

      Upgrade to the maximum RAM you are capable of. (A good practice at all times.) Mavericks will be a different beast, and it's well worth waiting to see on a 5+ year old machine, but you're probably fine.

      • by smash (1351)
        Mavericks is as fast or faster than ML on the same hardware, with better power consumption in my experience (MBP 15 2011)
    • by smash (1351)
      Lion -> ML -> Mavericks has been steady improvement, running on my 2011 hires 2.2Ghz 15" MBP.
  • Ars (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Optimal Cynic (2886377) on Thursday August 29, 2013 @11:46PM (#44713677)
    I'll wait for the Ars Technica review.
    • Siracusa already has most of it written, it sounds like, based on stuff he's said on Accidental Tech Podcast. Just a few weeks ago he was figuring Mavericks was still months away from release based on the issues it still had, but now it seems like there are lots of rumblings that it'll be coming sooner, which seems strange, since there's no reason they would want to detract attention from the September 10th iPhone announcement.

      • now it seems like there are lots of rumblings that it'll be coming sooner, which seems strange

        It doesn't seem too odd given they probably want to launch the Mac Pro with Mavericks, and more specifically want Mavericks in a general release at least a few weeks before the Mac Pro ships.

    • I'll give you my 2-second review: Right now, it's still buggy. It crashes. In fairness, it's a beta. Aside from that, if you like flat design and dislike skeuomorphism, you'll probably be pleased with some of the design changes. The improvements in multi-monitor support are kind of good, but still problematic. If you use the new setup, you can't have one window overlap with multiple monitors. Each window will only appear on on monitor at a time. I didn't really like that, but at least they let you ch

  • Okay, j/k.

    But did they name it after John McCain or Sarah Palin?

  • page 2 has some interesting directions for iCloud Keychain.
    "...online, shared between your devices and backed up by a meaty encryption system"
    Will all that 256-bit AES encryption system to outlast a NSL (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_security_letter) like effort or will it be a form of one time, one way only online system?
  • I've been a Mac OS user since 1997, and I love the interface (in some respects I still like Mac OS 9 better than X). I have owned two PowerPC Macs before, but when their move to Intel coincided with a little personal economic downturn, I went the hackintosh way. Sometimes I think of getting a new actual Apple, but when I look into it, they don't offer a machine that suits me.

    You just can't get a headless system with good specs, except the Mac Pro, and that's crazy overkill. The mini is a complete joke, with little memory, lame Intel video, no optical drive, no expandability whatsoever. I could go for an iMac (and deal with external drives, a single 1TB disk doesn't really cut it anymore). But I'd have to go with the rather expensive 27-inch ones to get a video card that beats my rather outdated GTS 250. Seriously, I assembled this machine a couple years ago, penny-pinching all the way, and even back then I knew this video card was the bottleneck. They still sell machines with worse video. It's quite ridiculous.

    So... too much money for little benefit. Maybe some other time, Apple.

    • by smash (1351)
      Serious question: what do you do that you could not do with a mini + thunderbolt enclosure?
      • Play modern games on high quality at a solid 60 fps. The Intel HD Graphics 4000 is the deal killer.

        • by smash (1351)
          Thunderbolt enclosure + PCIe video card. You can keep it and plug it into your next machine. not its not as fast as direct PCIe, but it is still capable of running 60 FPS or damn close on modern games. A friend has done this exact thing with his 11" MBA.
          • Checked eBay and Amazon: those enclosures are crazy expensive, some cost more than the computer itself.

  • There are some cool things in Mavericks for developers, including a 2D Sprite and Physics engine framework. That should help with bringing a lot of iPad-level 2D games to the Mac.

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