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Apple Releases Patch For Evasi0n Jailbreak (After It's Used 18 Million Times) 112

Posted by Soulskill
from the at-least-you-tried dept.
Sparrowvsrevolution writes "Apple has released a new update for iOS that prevents the jailbreak evasi0n released last month. But that hacking tool has already become the most popular jailbreak ever: It's been used to remove the software restrictions on 18.2 million devices in the 43 days between its release and the patch, according to data from Cydia, the app store for jailbroken devices. In its announcement of the update, Apple says it has fixed six bugs and was polite enough to credit the hackers behind evasi0n with finding four of them. At least one of the bugs used by evasi0n remains unpatched, according to David Wang, one of evasi0n's creators. And Wang says that he and his fellow hackers still have bugs in reserve for a new jailbreak, although they plan to keep them secret until the next major release."
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Apple Releases Patch For Evasi0n Jailbreak (After It's Used 18 Million Times)

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  • Re:FFS (Score:4, Insightful)

    by sg_oneill (159032) on Wednesday March 20, 2013 @03:43AM (#43221489)

    If you know about a security flaw, you should report it so they can be fixed.

    How are they going to produce jailbreaks if they report it?

    It would be irresponsible of them to deliberately collaborate with restricting user freedoms.

  • Re:FFS (Score:5, Insightful)

    by SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) on Wednesday March 20, 2013 @03:44AM (#43221499) Homepage

    I hate it when people cry foul when Apple patches a jailbreak method. I find visiting a web page or opening a PDF that can root your device then automatically installs binaries and run them without user intervention that has full access to your whole phone quite worrying.

    I do wonder if someone has maliciously used a jailbreak methods on their own web site, installing binaries remotely without the user knowing, and then taking data. How do you find out if this has happened?

  • Re:FFS (Score:5, Insightful)

    by sFurbo (1361249) on Wednesday March 20, 2013 @03:53AM (#43221535)
    This would clearly be the case if Apple did not insist on locking down devices in ways the consumers don't want. If there were, say, a menu option for "allow installation from unknown sources", there would be no excuse for sitting on bugs. As it is now, it is muddier: On the one hand, it is a security flaw that should be patched. On the other hand, it is a way to ensure that they can keep using their hardware in the way they want to.

    Of course, the easy way around the dilemma would be to insist on only paying money for hardware you actually own, not quasi-lease, which is the only option Apple wants for iOS hardware.
  • by wonkey_monkey (2592601) on Wednesday March 20, 2013 @04:31AM (#43221645) Homepage
    Wow, your personal experience of not using an iPad for very much has really added to this discussion. Thanks!
  • Re:FFS (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 20, 2013 @04:42AM (#43221687)

    How are they going to produce jailbreaks if they report it?

    It would be irresponsible of them to deliberately collaborate with restricting user freedoms.

    I don't care about jailbreaks, I'm not going to install one anyway. Ever. I do care about security flaws in the operating system that is installed on hundreds of millions of devices.

    It's plenty flexible enough for me without jailbreaking. I can compile and install my own apps without going through the store. You just have to have a developer account (which is not very expensive).

  • Re:FFS (Score:5, Insightful)

    by SternisheFan (2529412) on Wednesday March 20, 2013 @05:13AM (#43221765)

    This wouldn't be needed had Apple not been Apple. You know the whole "we know better than you what you want" motto.

    If they didn't know what people wanted I'm assuming they wouldn't be selling so well.

    Apple obviously doesn't know what at least 18 million, 200,000 of their customers want.

  • by dissy (172727) on Wednesday March 20, 2013 @05:20AM (#43221791)

    Just out of curiousity, which Android App do I go and download/purchase to run and execute iOS applications?

    Your "solution" is no different than saying the best way to run one specific windows program is to install linux

  • No. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday March 20, 2013 @05:26AM (#43221811)

    Fuck no.

    For fucking millionth time, the only way to not deliberately collaborate with restricting user freedoms is to not fucking buy the restricted stuff in the first place.

    You buy DRM'ed shit - you give the DRM producer money. The fact that you intend to use hacks to circumvent the DRM later only sends a clear message: "We're doing fine, we just need to clamp down on them hackers harder".

    This is not fighting for freedom, this is entitlement complex. I could somewhat understand looking to break DRM when non-DRM media in some class is nonexistent or virtually nonexistent - like in DVD video case, but not in cases like smartphones or, say, videogames. You're not entitled to it. Just say "fuck you" to them and their shiny toys and go play elsewhere - the playground is huge and alternatives are plenty.

  • Re:FFS (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Nerdfest (867930) on Wednesday March 20, 2013 @05:43AM (#43221863)

    there's never been malware that used any of them.

    That you know of.

  • by BasilBrush (643681) on Wednesday March 20, 2013 @08:27AM (#43222529)

    The main reason to jailbreak an iPhone is to pirate apps.

Swap read error. You lose your mind.

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