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Gnome Founder Miguel de Icaza Moves To Mac 815

Posted by Soulskill
from the usability-claims-another-victim dept.
TrueSatan writes "Miguel de Icaza, via his blog, has explained his gradual move to the Apple Mac platform. 'While I missed the comprehensive Linux toolchain and userland, I did not miss having to chase the proper package for my current version of Linux, or beg someone to package something. Binaries just worked.' Here is one of his main reasons: 'To me, the fragmentation of Linux as a platform, the multiple incompatible distros, and the incompatibilities across versions of the same distro were my Three Mile Island/Chernobyl.' Reaction to his announcement includes a blog post from Jonathan Riddell of Blue Systems/Kubuntu. Given de Icaza's past association with Microsoft (CodePlex Foundation) and the Free Software Foundation's founder Richard Stallman's description of de Icaza as a 'traitor to the free software community,' this might be seen as more of a blow to Microsoft than to GNU/Linux."
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Gnome Founder Miguel de Icaza Moves To Mac

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  • Good Riddance (Score:5, Insightful)

    by binarylarry (1338699) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:13PM (#43086233)

    Now he's going to try to clone all of Microsoft's clones of other people's technology for the Mac.

    Lets see how far that gets him.

  • by weilawei (897823) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:15PM (#43086257) Homepage
    And never looked back. Linux maintains its place as my workhorse, while I rest in the comfort of whichever other OS I feel like using that day, typically OS X or iOS. SSH and SFTP fill the gaps.
    • by LordMael (782478) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:42PM (#43087327)
      I just recently gave up on windows 7 and moved to linux (fedora) for my main work machine. It is running great on my laptop with none of the issues that Miguel mentioned (albiet his were a while ago) and runs all the tools I need to manage a 600+ site global WAN. (yes, even cisco CSM 4.2 runs in linux via wine with no real issues and about 3 minutes of prep before running the installer even under 64bit linux) I don't think i'll ever go back to windows for anything other than for my gaming rig at home :)
      • by SocietyoftheFist (316444) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @11:08PM (#43088171)

        His issues are issues that users have been having for some time. My first Linux was Slack 2.4 I believe and I moved to Mac OS X in 2007. It is nice having something that just works. In a way OS X is FreeBSD finally getting the recognition it deserved.

        • by JonJ (907502) <jon.jahren@gmail.com> on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @05:05AM (#43090271)
          Yeah, all those people out there using Macs know that it's really a mix of FreeBSD and various other software underneath... Or do they?
        • by DarkOx (621550) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @09:21AM (#43091575) Journal

          I find this funny. I have been a Slackware user both personally for about 15 years and professionally for about 10 years.

          I was recently given a Mac at work to test our stuff out on Mac OS. I have made a real effort to move all my daily work flow to the machine for the sake of really giving Mac OS a serious eval and trying to overcome the difference in familiarity.

          First off I have had anything but a just works experience. I have had to find and delete cache files to unbreak the app store. Re-install various packages because something went wrong the first time, xcode, office, and java.

          All in all my take away has been Slackware ever since version 13.0 or so has offered a better out of box experience than Mac OS X. XFCE 4.10 is much much better it terms of UI, features, and even eye candy. Having spent a month or so using a Mac 8 hours a day now; I can honestly say I'd never recommend one to anybody; not novice, nor expert. Truthfully the Aunt Tilly's out there and the I must have some proprietary closed application crowd are still better off on Windows and GNU/Linux/X.org/XFCE is better for everyone else. I would put Mac Os at the bottom of heap all around.

    • by amiga3D (567632) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @01:45AM (#43089403)

      I migrated from the Amiga to linux and over a decade later I'm pretty happy with it. It's not a perfect world but it's better than the alternatives and it's free. Not bad at all. I don't mind having to fix things up on a free operating system but paying out a bunch of money for windows and then struggling to keep it going would piss me off. I do have OS X on a mini and strangely that just works as long as I don't want to do anything Apple doesn't approve of. Linux video tools are getting better though so I may pass on OS X soon as well.

  • by Linegod (9952) <pasnak&warpedsystems,sk,ca> on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:20PM (#43086349) Homepage Journal

    So he is leaving the mess he caused?

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Exactly what I was thinking. He is running from the issues. The biggest problem GNU/Linux has is the communities insistence on cloning the competition. We should explicitly be advising people to replace hardware instead of “supporting” non-free drivers/firmware. It is not critical for user adoption. Linus was bitching about NVIDIA's lack of cooperation fairly recently and he is nearly a proponent of proprietary software.

      The Trisquel distribution / community has had no problems with new users tak

    • by X0563511 (793323) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @01:22AM (#43089247) Homepage Journal

      Miguel leaving for Mac: Action Movie Dude walking away from an explosion.

  • de Icaza (Score:5, Insightful)

    by RazorSharp (1418697) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:22PM (#43086369)

    I'm starting to think this guy just likes to read about himself in the news. I think his announcement is pretty funny - Linux Mint is a shining example of Linux as a functional desktop OS. It's still not as polished as OS X, but I do find myself using OS X less and less these days.

    Maybe he's just butthurt that Gnome probably doesn't have much of a future. I mean, the older versions are great if, uh, your graphics card stops working or something. . .

  • Whatever.... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by tetrahedrassface (675645) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:24PM (#43086399) Journal

    Been running Linux for 15 years now, and it's better than it ever has been. I guess this guy just lost whatever zeal he never really had in the first place for free software.....Read his blog post and it seems like he's just bored or lazy, or both. Oh well......

    • Re:Whatever.... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:19PM (#43087087)

      "Been running Linux for 15 years now, and it's better than it ever has been."

      You're right, it is better than it ever has been. I cut my teeth on Slackware, back when a bad X11 .config actually fucked up your monitor. And I did just that. Through it all, there was never a better operating system that was as open or as flexible as Linux. I could run it on cobbled together parts from dead x86 boxes pulled from dumpster dives.

      Now that I actually have some disposable income, I chose a Mac. Why? It let's me get shit done instead of fiddle-fucking with things that I don't honestly care about anymore. Back in college, I had all the time to compile and tweak libproffer0.2.3 from alpha to see if I could get it work. Now, I'd rather just pop in a DVD or download a binary blob and drag it to /Applications. My family time is limited and I'd rather be spending it with them. Does that mean the extra few hundred bucks was wasted? Maybe. I'd gladly trade that. My circumstances are my own experiences, but these are my opinions.

      • Re:Whatever.... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:58PM (#43087495)
        Many things changed since you had to "compile and tweak libproffer0.2.3". Today Linux just works, and for me personally it is much easier to use than Windows. So, "My family time is limited and I'd rather be spending it with them" than uninstalling "Antivirus 2000" trojan or Ask.com toolbar.
      • Re:Whatever.... (Score:4, Insightful)

        by smash (1351) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:59PM (#43087503) Homepage Journal
        This. So much this. Mirrors my experience pretty much as well. I started out on slackware back in 1995 and moved to the mac because I can afford the money but don't want to spend the TIME fucking around just to make shit work.
        • Re:Whatever.... (Score:4, Interesting)

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @10:26PM (#43087807)

          It's a common trend at Google. Freshly hired students come in using Linux on the desktop and after a few months they switch to OS X because they don't want to waste time fucking around with retarded desktop problems when there are far more interesting things for them to do.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Same here. Hardcore Linux at home since the mid 90s. I work in Linux 24/7 on servers today, but everything at home is a Mac, as is my work laptop. Been that way for 5 years, haven't regretted anything. I don't have time to mess with kernels and tweak my window manager.

      • by Hal_Porter (817932) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @11:01PM (#43088105)

        Now, I'd rather just pop in a DVD or download a binary blob and drag it to /Applications. My family time is limited and I'd rather be spending it with them.

        That's what the Germans probably said. "I don't care about elections and a free press and all that stuff. I'd rather just have the NAZIS sort things out so I can spend time with my Kinder, Kuche, Kirche"

        Now you may say the comparison between Apple and the NAZIS is a bit hyperbolic. But is it really? Both Apple fans and the SS wore mostly black clothes and are almost entirely Caucasian. Sure there are some Asians in there, but then NAZIS were quite keen on the Japanese.

        The more you think of it, the more you realise that buying an Apple produced device is exactly the same as voting for the NAZIS.

        Still it's better than using Linux or bloody Windows 8.

      • Re:Whatever.... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Gavagai80 (1275204) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @11:46PM (#43088495) Homepage
        I'm too lazy to pop in any DVDs or download any binary blobs, which is a major reason I prefer linux. I can't remember the last time I wanted something that wasn't in the repositories.
      • Re:Whatever.... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by fearofcarpet (654438) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @01:46AM (#43089411)

        "Been running Linux for 15 years now, and it's better than it ever has been."

        You're right, it is better than it ever has been. I cut my teeth on Slackware, back when a bad X11 .config actually fucked up your monitor. And I did just that. Through it all, there was never a better operating system that was as open or as flexible as Linux. I could run it on cobbled together parts from dead x86 boxes pulled from dumpster dives.

        Now that I actually have some disposable income, I chose a Mac. Why? It let's me get shit done instead of fiddle-fucking with things that I don't honestly care about anymore. Back in college, I had all the time to compile and tweak libproffer0.2.3 from alpha to see if I could get it work. Now, I'd rather just pop in a DVD or download a binary blob and drag it to /Applications. My family time is limited and I'd rather be spending it with them. Does that mean the extra few hundred bucks was wasted? Maybe. I'd gladly trade that. My circumstances are my own experiences, but these are my opinions.

        I'm right there with you; back in the day not only did I have the time to tinker with X11 .config or compile the latest kernel from source, but it was in fact how I learned about computers and was exposed to programming (I am not a programmer nor do I do anything related to IT for a living). These days it is way more important for me to have a fast, reliable workflow that is compatible with all the other software that my largely computer illiterate colleagues work with. I routinely send documents out in ODT format and have them returned in DOCX; at least I can fire up Word on my Mac and export it in DOC so NeoOffice can open it correctly. But as much as I love the MacBook Air, I hate Apple desktops, so I do run OSX on a hackintosh... I dunno, maybe to maintain some semblance of nerd cred.

        At home I still run Linux because I prefer it and I'm not under time pressure. But I still keep an OSX partition for days when I work from home because, at the end of the day, I find that what I really like about OSX is the availability of software. There are some killer programs--most by small developers--that just don't exist on other platforms and that make my life easier. However, I find the direction the OS is headed distressing. Let's say I want to copy a Keynote presentation and then edit the copy; I'd better remember to first "Duplicate" and then "Save a Copy" because if I edit it first and then Duplicate it will ask if I want to Revert first, but if I don't, then I get two copies of the edited document and have to waste time reverting the original with the pointlessly fancy Apple-style graphics. Why? Because Apple unilaterally decided that "Save As" needed to go away (sounds familiar... GNOME!). And don't get me started on the disaster that is iTunes, the abomination that Apple insists drive my venerable and infinitely useful iPod Nano. At lest I can still use rsync to backup my Mac.

        My hope is that something--maybe Linux gaming--will drive Linux just enough into the mainstream that the same sort of software that I like on the Mac starts popping up on Linux. Then I will probably migrate away from the hybrid iOSenstein that OSX has morphed into that ties you to the Apple Cloud and Appstore and actively punishes you for using Android devices instead of i-things.

  • by zkiwi34 (974563) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:24PM (#43086403)

    As in, he's screwed it as much as he can. Now, it's time to screw up Apple.

    Either that or he's just a complete plank who is self-aggrandising by stating he's going Mac.

  • Join the party (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Alimony Pakhdan (1855364) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:24PM (#43086405)
    I did the same about 10 years ago for the same reasons. Oddly enough it was the people at the local LUG with their iBooks & MacBooks that made me realize something was amiss.
    • Re:Join the party (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Volanin (935080) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:48PM (#43086687)

      I have a Macbook. It runs Linux exclusively. People might have diverging opinions about the price, but very few question that it's a very well engineered machine. Have you tried looking at their screens to see what OS they were running?

      By the way, 10 years ago iBooks were still using PowerPC processors, and Macbooks didn't exist until 2006.

    • by Geof (153857) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:27PM (#43087187) Homepage

      I went the other way about two and a half years ago. I'm sure someone will tell me I was doing it wrong; I wouldn't be surprised if they're right. But I found the FOSS package managers for OS X incredibly painful to work with. I remember it taking at least a day of mucking around with compiling and pre-built binaries just to get the tools I needed for web development. It took me ten minutes to get the same thing working in Ubuntu.

      Still, there were plenty of headaches: sleep mode, hybrid graphics and synaptics. Even though I had been avoiding dependence on proprietary software since activation chased me away from Windows, I had to give up really useful Mac tools like Scrivener, Tinderbox and Screen Flow (I still boot the Mac when I need to do a screencast). I used to be a programmer. Now I'm a social scientist. These days I do mostly reading and writing, not programming; the loss of Scrivener was a hard blow. I smoothed the way by writing my own tool.

      OS X was significantly better for all but the most ordinary end-user applications. My area of research is the online commons - copyright, FOSS, creative commons - stuff like that. I could make my peace with Apple when they were only a pipsqueak tyrant. When they released the iPad and it was locked down, I simply couldn't stomach it anymore: and I was tying myself to an ecosystem that could be progressively enclosed by Apple. A friend of mine - a social scientist, not a programmer - switched to Mint, proving it was finally doable. Also, XMonad is pretty cool, and my search for a decent editor finally led me to take vim seriously.

      Linux isn't perfect, but it's come a long way since I first used it for development in 1993. It really is usable - and sometimes excellent - for everyday work. Using a platform is supporting that platform. I wouldn't tell anyone else what to do, but I'm content to use this one.

  • by filesiteguy (695431) <kai@perfectreign.com> on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:25PM (#43086423) Homepage
    I'm still not happy about his whole, "Qt isn't OSS so I'm writing GNOME to compete with KDE" move back in the late '90s. Though I appreciate Ximian, I fail to see why he's even relevant these days.

    I was a HUGE Linux fanboi in the late '90s through about 2010. I agree with him, however, that Linux just doesn't work as a day-to-day end-user platform anymore. As it is, I'm mostly using my Nexus tablet and Galaxy phone for tasks, and then resort to Wintendo when I need.
  • by metrix007 (200091) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:25PM (#43086425)

    It doesn't matter his affiliation or if he likes or even works for MS or not. Judge the statement on it's own, and it's true.

    It's something Linux geeks have trouble admitting, but it is the sole reason Linux usage has not skyrocketed in adoption. If the LSB worked anthing close to how it was envisioned, developers would flock to the platform and then so would users.

    At the moment, people use the distro they like and defend, while non linux geeks use distros like Ubuntu or Mint, which are the only platforms commercial developers tend to target.

    • by manu0601 (2221348) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:20PM (#43087099)

      If the LSB worked anthing close to how it was envisioned, developers would flock to the platform and then so would users

      LSB solves some bits of the problem, but not the most troublesome. It does not help you with libraries or kernel changing ABI in a backward incompatible way, something that causes packaging headaches when upgrading a given system.

      What is a bit frustrating is that it could be done cleanly, if developers just took the time for it. For instance NetBSD base system is nicely backward compatible. A binary built on NetBSD-0.8 is still able to run 20 years later on NetBSD 6.0.1. And you can throw a package built for NetBSD 5.0 on NetBSD 6.0.1, it works... provided you have also installed the dependencies for it, which are provided in other packages outside of NetBSD base system, and this is where things goes wrong. Package A will need version 1.0.1 of package B, you have version 1.0 installed. You need to upgrade B. But B is required by packages C, D, E... Z, and you will have to upgrade them too. But they require new versions of others packages, and so on.

  • by MouseTheLuckyDog (2752443) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:26PM (#43086435)
    Apple's loss is Linux's gain.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:28PM (#43086475)

    It's ironic that he complains about fragmentation, since he's largely responsible. Gnome is pretty shitty, but numerous distributions waste effort either supporting it or for some reason using it primarily instead of KDE which is a lot better. If it weren't Gnome all Linux desktops would have long ago standardized on KDE and we'd be better off for it.

  • Back in the day... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by CyberSnyder (8122) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:31PM (#43086513)

    I liked to tinker with configs and settings and libraries, but now I like my home computer to just work. They cost more, but are worth it. I still have a unix command line and most of the open source tools but have access to commercial software as well.

    Yummy KoolAid.

    • by Nerdfest (867930)

      Wait until you're only allowed to install software from the Mac App Store unless you buy a 'developer licence'. Don't think that's going to happen?

    • by future assassin (639396) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @10:02PM (#43087535) Homepage

      seven cats and one dog. Four laptops running Mint 14, 1 netbook running Mint 11, HTPC running Mint 14 KDE and second htpc running Mint 14 KDE. AND guess what, they all just work after install. Weird how you can't get it to just work.

      but now I like my home computer to just work. They cost more, but are worth it. I still have a unix command line and most of the open source tools but have access to commercial software as well.

      Yummy KoolAid.

  • by Osgeld (1900440) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:34PM (#43086559)

    founder buys a mac and doesnt look back

  • by gQuigs (913879) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:37PM (#43086585) Homepage

    Nope. In fact, I think it made it worse.

    And they are still advertising Moonlight even though it is a dead project (and they admit it!). Can someone PLEASE turn off this site*! http://www.go-mono.com/moonlight/ [go-mono.com]

    One of the biggest problem with Linux is people abandoning projects and not removing them from the net/distros. You were wrong, you've admited it, but you leave us the mess.

    *In all seriousness, the few Silverlight websites redirect their Linux users to this page where it almost never works for them. This of course makes the Linux experience go from just "Unsupported" to building up the hopes of the users and then Unsupported.

  • de Icaza (Score:5, Insightful)

    by jgotts (2785) <`jgotts' `at' `gmail.com'> on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @08:53PM (#43086761)

    Please refrain from attacking de Icaza for these simple reasons.

    Like Stallman, de Icaza has donated countless hours of organization and programming time to Linux. Neither got rich as a result. Politics aside, Linux is about superior engineering, even if only as a side effect. Because of the efforts of these two individuals, among many others, Linux is now the most popular operating system on the planet. By any stretch of the imagination, they were and are victorious. Android is closing in on a billion users, but regardless of what Google's marketing materials may tell you, Android is a Linux distribution, and GNU and GNOME have been perfecting Linux distributions for over two decades.

    I understand that Android does not ship with much GNU or GNOME software, but GNU and GNOME are what built Linux. Without either, the foundations upon which Android runs would never have accreted enough functionality to even think about running a smartphone.

    As mostly non-rich people, often not closely allied with specific companies, we don't have publicists or agents. We don't come off as polished. We don't have speech writers. Forgive us for seeming offensive, rude, obnoxious, conceited, full of ourselves, or some other adjective. We're people, and as engineers we're trained to traffic in the honest truth. Once you meet us you'll like us, for the most part. And even if you don't, enjoy using our software. Contribute if you like.

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      Please refrain from attacking de Icaza for these simple reasons.

      I thought we were attacking him for a complex, varied, manifold set of reasons. It's not just "I hates teh Mono", it's "Mono served little real purpose and served only to assist Microsoft, if only by a trivial amount". Or whatever the pet peeve is.

      As mostly non-rich people, often not closely allied with specific companies, we don't have publicists or agents. We don't come off as polished. We don't have speech writers.

      Well then, if you don't want people to form an according opinion of you, shut the hell up. Obviously I don't care.

    • Re:de Icaza (Score:4, Informative)

      by seebs (15766) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @11:15PM (#43088221) Homepage

      But it's precisely his "contributions" for which he's being attacked -- he's drawn immense amounts of development effort into fragmentation, bloatware, and attempts to be nearly-compatible with something Microsoft is going to abandon and wreck as soon as they think the compatibility shims are good enough to be a threat.

  • by Freshly Exhumed (105597) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:01PM (#43086839) Homepage

    On reading Miguel's blog post I found myself thinking about a character who showed up on Gilligan's Island who was perpetually lost in his biplane. His nickname was "Wrong Way."

    Ever notice how Miguel always seems to get involved in chaotic situations and then flees them by taking the wrong train, ending up in the middle of nowhere? Why does anyone even listen to this guy?

  • by antifoidulus (807088) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:01PM (#43086849) Homepage Journal
    Can't speak for Icaza but for me personally, the trend towards making the Linux desktop "easier to use" has had me running away from the platform as a Desktop.... the problem is if you are going to make a GUI(and as a result make command line configuration more difficult), that GUI better damn well work. And at least with the desktop managers I have tried, it doesn't. So I find myself constantly trying to figure out what they changed from the previous version(that isn't working in the current version), and of course constantly changing where things are located etc. doesn't help.

    If you are going to change the desktop experience in order to make it "easier to use", you damn well better get it right, or else not only do you fail to capture a new audience, you end up alienating the current user base. That seems to be what Gnome has done.
    For me personally I develop on a mac, and run my test and prod on Linux(I've tried OS X as a server, and ironically it seems to suffer the same problems as a server as Linux does as a Desktop, they tried to make it "easier to use", but didn't get the abstraction right and the result is a mess).
    I was recently put in the unfortunate position of having to develop a PHP app, and I tried doing everything on Fedora 18 with Gnome, and.... that was just plain frustrating. The installer tried to be "easy to use", but often failed, the system got stuck in reboot but I couldn't figure out what service was failing because I couldn't get it to not show that stupid startup animation and instead show me the boot log etc. Eventually I got the machine booted and then just ssh into it from my Mac, much less frustrating.

    Bottom line: don't make Linux "easier to use" by breaking a bunch of shit.
  • Publicity stunt. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by csumpi (2258986) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:05PM (#43086889)
    I don't have any issues with Miguel, but I met him about 4 years ago and even then he was using a macbook with osx. Or maybe he was just a closet osx user and now coming out? Or he's just starting a fight?
  • Oh for fuck's sake (Score:5, Interesting)

    by MichaelSmith (789609) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:09PM (#43086937) Homepage Journal

    To me, the fragmentation of Linux as a platform, the multiple incompatible distros

    So he chooses to get his hardware and software from one vendor. Okay thats very neat and simple but he could get it from Canonical as well, or one of the BSD projects.

  • by Nite_Hawk (1304) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:10PM (#43086949) Homepage

    As I sit here on my MacBook Air running Ubuntu, working on Ceph (ie getting stuff done!) while browsing slashdot. I've tried OSX many times, and I keep coming back to Linux because it's so much *more* productive, especially when working on code. The only thing I miss is netflix.

    So whatever. I still have a soft spot for Apple hardware, but I'll stick with Linux thank-you-very-much.

  • Excuses... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by vga_init (589198) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:14PM (#43087021) Journal

    I use serveral operating systems frequently due to work (and it used to be my hobby). I appreciate OS X's desktop interface a lot, but I don't realy understand Miguel's justification that Mac "just works" in terms of package availability and the quality of the base system.

    It's no secret that OS X's base is lifted from FreeBSD. Is Linux too fragmented and chaotic for you? Do you long for a complete and and integrated system base in a single source tree, backed by unified development effort? FreeBSD has that. It also has very high package availability (better than most Linux distros).

    On the Linux side, I use Fedora. I never have any trouble finding packages for Fedora. The quality that gets put into the base system of Fedora also leaves little to be desired.

    I don't fault Miguel for his choice. OS X is nice--it gets the job done. I just don't think OS X is really giving him something special that he couldn't have gotten with Linux, BSD, or even Windows. If he misses the development toolchain of Linux, he should go back to Linux; that's totally understandable.

  • fragmented my ass (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:15PM (#43087027)

    I moved to a MacBook for the sole virtue of it being a well-designed notebook, but I have strong feelings regarding Mac OS's functionality and "administrability" when compared to linux distros. It bothers me that there is NO package system to speak of, and you basically have to scour the internet like a fool to find basic tools that are one apt-get away in Ubuntu. I mean, yeah, I know there's stuff like homebrew, fink and macports, but so far all of those gave me nothing but headache, for the sole reason they are third-party hacks not supported (or even acknowledged) by the builders of the system (i.e. Apple).

    To top it in terms of silliness, he speaks of "the binaries just works", but he neglects to mention that you still have to look for them in really random places over Google - something that apt-get like systems have been doing securely for the last what, 10 years? I indeed find it very odd that, although there's only one hardware platform for the Mac OS to run, all those third party packaging tools I mentioned actually require you to COMPILE everything again; then you go to the Ubuntu/Debian world, meant to run on several platforms and there's BINARIES for just about anything.

    I really want to know what this guy is on. Gnome was a great thing, and he let it rot into that sad piece of bad usability called Unity; then he started dabbling in the very proprietary, advantage-free world of .NET, and he just bows down to Jobs walled garden legacy? I don't get it.

    Anyway, freedom not to use is one of the 4 fundamental freedoms, according to RMS. Nothing of value is being (newly) lost, so big effing deal.

  • Debian to the rescue (Score:4, Interesting)

    by hexhead (106412) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:16PM (#43087045) Homepage

    After developing with Mac OSX for a year using the command line interface (i.e., lots of terminals), I found I needed some sort of ports-like package management which has its own headaches. After jacking around with seemingly never-ending updates to Ubuntu and it's resource hungry UI, I found Debian quite refreshing. Not on the bleeding edge, but this is a GOOD THING! Never regretted it.

  • Sounds like Debian (Score:5, Interesting)

    by massysett (910130) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:22PM (#43087121) Homepage

    "Machine would suspend and resume without problem, WiFi just worked, audio did not stop working, I spend three weeks without having to recompile the kernel to adjust this or that, nor fighting the video drivers,"

    Interesting, that is identical to the experience that I have with Debian. Even people on Arch don't need to "recompile the kernel to adjust this or that." But I hope he enjoys his Mac.

  • by seebs (15766) on Tuesday March 05, 2013 @09:54PM (#43087463) Homepage

    Wait, so, the guy who basically pushed 90% of the bloat, incompatibility, and other such madness I've ever seen in Linux is leaving because of the bloat and incompatibility?

    Dude, not cool. You made that bed, now lie in it.

  • by SEE (7681) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @12:05AM (#43088657) Homepage

    The guy who launched GNOME as a counter to KDE is complaining about "the fragmentation of Linux as a platform"? Tthe guy who made the decision replace GNUstep (which was the GNU project's official toolkit/framework in 1996) in favor of GTK â" he's fled to the Mac? He's got the chutzpah to say, "Linux just never managed to cross the desktop chasm"â"without admitting that his decisions are a major cause of that failure?

    Good damn riddance.

  • by waspleg (316038) on Wednesday March 06, 2013 @05:32AM (#43090431) Journal

    I just read at least a dozen "but OSX just WORKS!!" threads, "I don't have to do anything to make it WORK!#@!".

    Well, guess what. What you spend your money on is *REAL* *VOTING*; more than any election.

    When you *VOTE* for shitty, evil Apple Business Practices (that would be ALL OF THEM), you're supporting and proliferating Evil (tm). They're worse than Microsoft, just without as many of your Billions. Keep feeding the beast and see what happens.

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