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iOS 6.1.3 Beta 2 Patches evasi0n Jailbreak

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  • by Hartree (191324) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:08PM (#43011057)

    Apple: Doing our best to remind you it's OUR gadget, not yours.

    • by cshark (673578) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:11PM (#43011073) Homepage

      Right. That's exactly it. It's a clear message to power users, and it's hard to mistake it for anything else. What they're saying is, "don't buy our gadgets."

      • by Pausanias (681077) <pausaniasx AT gmail DOT com> on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:18AM (#43011931)

        I used to jailbreak during iOS 4-5 days. Spent a lot of time installing this or that tweak, feeling like such a cool "power user." Oh my, animated wallpaper and SSV Normandy replacing the words "AT&T" on the upper left corner of my screen. This or that tweak that let me access this or that feature with one less gesture than before.

        What a freaking waste of time. And at what cost? Random applications written by anonymous people on the net running as root on your iPhone, with full access to your private data if they wanted it? You are putting yourself at extremely high risk by circumventing the iPhone's security and running all this closed source software as root.

        Jailbreaking is a security nightmare, and you're not worthy of the term "power user" if you allow someone called chpwn or BigBoss to run closed source shit as root on your personal communication device. By the way, that jerk BigBoss wouldn't let me run his software if I blocked ads on my hosts file. WTF dude, let us live a little?

        If you really want flexibility, at least go to Android, where they publish their source.

        It finally took cold turkey---bought an iPhone 5 when it came out, with no jailbreak for months---to learn that I really like my iPhone the way God intended it: nice and stable and closed---and even if not 100% secure, still better than giving some random dude called p0sixninja full access to my device. I get more stuff done now---you know, real work that I need to get done for my real career and not messing with a half-assed implementation of Expose that causes my phone to reboot half the time (yeah---the instability and the random reboots are yet another downside of jailbreaking).

        • by blind biker (1066130) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:48AM (#43012021) Journal

          to learn that I really like my iPhone the way God intended it:

          You are allowed to cal God by His real name - Steve Jobs.

        • by kayoshiii (1099149) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @06:57AM (#43012749)

          My take home from your post - you think Apple is God... And possibly you want protection from yourself.
          Is that pretty much it?

        • by morgauxo (974071) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @10:23AM (#43013693)

          High risk? Nothing bad has happened to me! I think you are just spreading FUD!

          Some of us actually need functionality that Apple choses not to allow. For example.. I jailbreak to get encarcerapp. It's an app that allows me to lock out the home button or even the touch screen. Then I can hand the pad to my 3 y/o daughter and she can play a game or watch a movie while I drive the car and she isn't getting herself out of the app and then asking me to get it going again every couple of seconds. Somebody at Apple decided their customers shouldn't have that sort of functionality so... have to jailbreak to get it.

          Now, don't get me wrong. The best option is just to buy Android and let Apple and iOS rot... if I were buying a tablet myself that is what I would do. My workplace bought the tablets. They are iOS fans big time. No, I'm not abusing company resources. They told us to use them personally, let our families use them, etc... It was all about being with the times, learning about the latest tech and maybe getting ideas we can use in our own products, not necessarily about doing our work on the tablet.

          This is what I learned. To allow a child to use an iOS device you need to jailbreak and install incarcerapp. Otherwise it is useless!

      • by gl4ss (559668) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @04:45AM (#43012371) Homepage Journal

        Right. That's exactly it. It's a clear message to power users, and it's hard to mistake it for anything else. What they're saying is, "don't buy our gadgets."

        they already said so when they made it a policy.

        the idea that they'd on purpose leave these breaks in for power users is laughable idiocy. of course they're going to patch them. you want to play with the devices then you pay the developer fee.

    • by amicusNYCL (1538833) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:12PM (#43011079)

      I've always wondered why jailbreaking exists. If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone? The reason I've never even considered an iPhone is because of Apple's attitude towards it.

      • by cshark (673578) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:15PM (#43011097) Homepage

        Well, the way I remember it, jail-breaking came about because someone noticed that you can run a full on unix command line on an i-phone. This was before we had Android phones, and it was really fucking novel at the time. I can't tell you how many times I had to sit there, and hear the fan boys ask me things like, "So, can you ssh into your Nokia?" To which I always told them, "Look dude, if I wanted a command line, it would have a real fucking keyboard."

      • by dreamchaser (49529) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:17PM (#43011105) Homepage Journal

        I've always wondered why jailbreaking exists. If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone? The reason I've never even considered an iPhone is because of Apple's attitude towards it.

        It shouldn't matter. If you buy something it is yours, and you should be able to do whatever you want with it. I prefer Android (I use an Asus Transformer Prime as my tablet) but work gave me an iPhone. I don't care for it, but not because of the walled garden. I just like Android better. That being said, if I did decide to buy my own iOS device I should be able to do whatever I want with it and its software. That is why jailbreaking exists.

      • by EzInKy (115248) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:17PM (#43011113)

        If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone?

        Perhaps Apple's view is to let those who can, do....and those who can't don't?

        • by Microlith (54737) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:28PM (#43011195)

          That's obviously not Apple's view. Their view is obviously that no one does anything without Apple's permission.

          • by EzInKy (115248) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:49PM (#43011313)

            Are you sure you just don't have Apple wrong? They could be just out to improve the species! Those that figure out how to work around their lockdowns get to proceed, those that don't, don't.

      • by MightyYar (622222) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:29PM (#43011201)

        Most Android devices are locked, too. Sometimes you buy a product for other considerations and if you can root it... great.

        • by cheater512 (783349) <nick@nickstallman.net> on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:33PM (#43011223) Homepage

          Few are locked properly. 95% get rooted with no troubles.

        • by Microlith (54737) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:41PM (#43011267)

          Caveats, caveats everywhere.

          Android, even on devices with a locked bootloader, allows for installation of software from sources other than the Play Store. On iOS devices, you cannot install any software from sources other than the App Store, period.

          Android vendors that lock the bootloader quite often catch a lot of shit, so I don't really see how this is equivalent.

          • by MightyYar (622222) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @09:22AM (#43013269)

            Caveats, caveats everywhere.

            Yes, well, such is the nature of comparing a very specific product (the iPhone) with a line of hundreds of very diverse products. I had two iPhones, and now I have an Android (as well as a Kindle Fire HD... not sure if that counts as Android).

            Anyway, I find both environments very lacking without root. I've also found the alternative Android markets to be mostly crap, even going so far as to install the Google market on my Kindle.

          • by Ash Vince (602485) * on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @10:20AM (#43013663) Journal

            Android, even on devices with a locked bootloader, allows for installation of software from sources other than the Play Store.

            Only if you turn that feature on. Most devices default to not allowing this and throw up a warning if you try and enable it. You are free to ignore the warning but then it is your own dumb fault if you screw up.

            I just checked my Samsung Galaxy S3 and I never seem to have needed to allow the installing of untrusted apps after 6 months of ownership so I probably never will.

            The real "problem" with Android is that Google leave the play store far more open than the Apple equivalent and force users to engage their brain even when installing stuff from the store. This is one of the things I actually like about Android since I have no problem doing some basic Google research any time I want to install an app.

            The alternative is go the Apple way and find you are not allowed to install certain things just because Steve Jobs (or one of his successors) did not agree with whatever it is you wanted to install (like maybe a flash player). There might be very few apps withdrawn on a whim by some twat at Apple but if there is a single one then that is too many by my book.

            Some people do not want to research any apps they install on their phone and want to be able to browse a limited list of apps and know that anything they see is perfectly safe and is being regularly vetted by Apple. For them an iphone is a good fit, that is just not me.

        • by fredprado (2569351) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:50PM (#43011323)
          It would be a nice argument and all if a locked Android phone wasn't about as permissive as a jailbroken iPhone.
      • by hovelander (250785) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:34PM (#43011231)

        I've always wondered why jailbreaking exists. If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone? The reason I've never even considered an iPhone is because of Apple's attitude towards it.

        Because Jony Ive makes a super spanky tablet and all the developer love is initially born in iOS. I hate the walled garden and jailbroke because of it, but Holy
        Chocolate Buddha if it isn't the best build quality of all the tablets right now.

        If Google finally did something with the red headed Moto stepchild and brought out a RAZR inspired tablet with substantial battery life? I might be there when it happens in a few years. (Why they drag their feet here, I have no clue.)

        So in short, it's the sexiest tablet going atm. That'll change, (and that time is close).

        • by jonwil (467024) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @01:36AM (#43011783)

          Please explain what makes the Nexus 7 and Nexus 10 tablets worse than an iPad...

          • by FyRE666 (263011) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:03AM (#43011873) Homepage

            I own a Nexus 7, Nexus 10 and the latest iPad (also owned previous iPads, iPhones, and numerous other Android phones/tablets). The build quality and battery life of the iPad is certainly higher than the Nexus devices. It's pretty obvious if you've used both extensively. I've also had more glitches on the Android devices (e.g. current Google Nexus phone not ringing when people call after it's been running for a week or so, sometimes staying on lock screen when a call comes in, occasional UI quirks). Also the iPad mail app is much better than the Android offerings. Nexus 7 has terrible sound quality through external speaker - not a show stopper, but really should be addressed.

            That said, I much prefer using the Android devices for day to day use. I also spend far more time developing for Android than iOS (in fact let my iOS dev license expire now) and I recommend Android to clients for the type of work I do - my apps are generally not available to the public. I hate being tethered to iTunes, forced to distribute apps via the Apple iTunes store, and Apples general lack of innovation or improvement (not adopting NFC for example).

            So that's my experience; day to day I carry a Nexus 7 around with me, along with my Nexus phone. If I'm anticipating doing a lot of email, I'll either take my laptop, or the iPad2 instead. Im not a fanboi of either camp - just use what I think is most suitable.

            • by AmiMoJo (196126) * <mojoNO@SPAMworld3.net> on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @08:43AM (#43013083) Homepage

              The Nexus 10 is on a par with any iPad for build quality. The Nexus 7 does feel a little bit less high end but then again costs half what an iPad Mini does, and it has a better screen. It is by no means cheap and the textured back cover makes it very easy to hold.

              Battery life seems about the same for each, except that you can replace the Nexus 7 battery easily so there is no need to go easy on it.

          • by sapphire wyvern (1153271) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @06:01AM (#43012599)

            The primary use case for my tablet is reading documents. For that, the 4:3 retina screen is better than the 16:9 and 16:10 screens on all the Android tablets I'm aware of.

            If there's an Android tablet with a 4:3 high DPI screen (1024x768 does not cut it for US Letter or A4 typeset documents in single page full screen mode), I'd be interested to hear about it, because I like Android better than iOS for a variety of reasons.

            Also, can anyone recommend a great PDF app for Android? I use GoodReader on my iPad and it renders complex PDFs very sharply and extremely fast. I haven't found anything with that kind of rendering speed on Android yet, and I want a better reader app for my Galaxy Note 2. I don't actually care about all the annotation features of GoodReader - I don't need a feature-complete replacement - I just want something that's blazingly fast, high resolution, and at least supports bookmarks & outlines.

          • by geminidomino (614729) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @09:22AM (#43013267) Journal

            I can't speak for those two, specifically, since I passed them up when I learned they were going the stupid route of "no sd cards." Compared to the tablets I *have* used, though, from the lowly Asus A200(work) to the Samsung Note 10.1(returned) to the Transformer Infinity(owned), on the other hand, the iPad(work) is superior in just one very important aspect:

            "Keyboard" responsiveness. I don't know if Android's keyboard process needs to be niced a little lower or what, but when I'm out-typing the system on a goddamn virtual keyboard, something's wrong.

            Thankfully, CyanogenMod 10 improved it a little bit on the Infinity, so it's at least usable, but damn if I wouldn't love the iPad's keyboard on Android (the rest of the whole sterilized iExperience can go hang).

      • by AK Marc (707885) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:46PM (#43011301)
        What should someone do if they like the iPhone, but can't get AT&T? My solution (for my wife's phone, I'm on Android), was to get an iPhone and jailbreak it. This was before there was any "legal" way to buy an unlocked one.
      • by Kyusaku Natsume (1098) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:01AM (#43011369)

        For most people phones -of any kind- are appliances. For them the lack of freedom to run any arbitrary code is a good feature, and are well served by Apple's model.

      • by tlhIngan (30335) <<ten.frow> <ta> <todhsals>> on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:11AM (#43011903)

        I've always wondered why jailbreaking exists. If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone? The reason I've never even considered an iPhone is because of Apple's attitude towards it.

        Because the walled garden is just one aspect of the entire thing. If you want a decent phone with a screen that's not humongous and actually usable single-handedly, your options are REALLY limited. A phone with a 4" or smaller screen on Android doesn't exist if you want a decent CPU, lots of RAM, and a high-res screen.

        Basically, if you want something like a flagship Samsung Galaxy S III has but in a screen that's smaller, it doesn't exist in the Android realm.

        Or perhaps the user likes the way iOS does things compared to Android. It's a phone, after all, and if the user is frustrated with Android, no amount of software freedom will convince them it's better.

        Lots of reasons - the whole "software freedom" is really just a minor aspect in analyzing what device suits a user best.

        Or put another why - why do people choose Windows over Linux? Why do they install Windows 7 over WIndows 8, when they can install Linux? Hell, I develop Linux code using Windows - my Linux box sits headless beside me and I use Samba and gVim/Win32 and SSH windows because I find X clunky, slow, ugly and really poor font rendering.

        Jailbreaking is often a bonus, as well. 7M jailbroken iOS 6 devices is a drop compared to all the iOS devices out there.

      • by SilenceBE (1439827) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:56AM (#43012053)
        Because of the bigger range of quality apps to be honest.

        And btw I'm an android developer but my main tablet for example is still an iPad. The thing that harms andriod seriously is fragmentation, bad documentation (quality, not quantity) , less strictness which results that a lot of hw companies are sloppy, weak support for older devices, no really good design guidelines,... . For me it is the Drupal of the mobile world. Not a bad platform, but it sometimes drives me nuts.

        People that say things like "they think the software is better... And are greatly mistaken" have never used the two platforms on a daily basis. Android is slowly getting there, but the really big problem is that a lot of devices are still suck on 2.3 gingerbread. It would be nice if android hw companies would support their older devices as Apple does with older hardware. An iPad 1 being stuck on iOS 5 is nothing in comparison with a lot of android situations. And the number of normal people (non geeks) that root their phone is zero to none.

        To be honest with Android I have the feeling that a lot of love gets into the advertisment or google services part of the os, but it lacks in the other departements. The Android API (especially the older versions) sometimes amazes me in stupidity.
        • by AmiMoJo (196126) * <mojoNO@SPAMworld3.net> on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @08:34AM (#43013041) Homepage

          Android is like VHS and iOS is like BetaMAX. VHS was open and anyone could implement it, resulting in some really terrible VCRs but also some really good ones. BetaMAX was pretty much limited to just Sony and eventually lost out because VHS outsold it.

          BTW, having recently done some Android development I think the documentation is fine, certainly no worse than most systems. Admittedly I have not done any iOS development for comparison, but most of the people raging about Android on Stack Exchange are the ones who don't really get the mobile app paradigm.

      • by epyT-R (613989) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @03:21AM (#43012115)

        because many have bought an iphone or other closed device, then later found out about the coolness of running alternative software..

    • by Kyusaku Natsume (1098) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:56PM (#43011355)

      Yeah, it is not like the vulnerabilities used by jailbreak tools could ever be also used by malware or anything.

    • by purpledinoz (573045) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @03:28AM (#43012141)
      Apple: All your iGadgets, are belong to us!
    • by crazyjj (2598719) * on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @10:27AM (#43013743)

      You will bow down before Apple, users, no matter that it takes an eternity! YOU WILL BOW DOWN BEFORE APPLE!!!

  • Vulnerabilities (Score:5, Insightful)

    by thadman08 (732965) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:25PM (#43011175) Homepage

    Why is there so much outrage at this? Jailbreaking works by first finding bugs and vulnerabilities and then exploiting them. Yes, Apple is preventing jailbreaking, but they're also securing their OS.

    • Re:Vulnerabilities (Score:2, Insightful)

      by cheater512 (783349) <nick@nickstallman.net> on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:35PM (#43011235) Homepage

      Because vulnerabilities that don't allow jail breaking don't get fixed terribly quickly?

      • Re:Vulnerabilities (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Desler (1608317) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:06AM (#43011409)

        Such as?

    • Re:Vulnerabilities (Score:2, Insightful)

      by girlintraining (1395911) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:42PM (#43011277)

      Why is there so much outrage at this?

      There's this strange, antiquidated notion some people have that a device they spend hundreds of dollars on, are in physical possession of, and which contains a ton of personal information and is the de facto way for the world to get ahold of them, belongs to them. So when these social degenerates are told that they have no say in how their data is used, whether or not they're tracked, what applications they can and cannot use, etc., they get upset.

      We should probably just ignore them. Such morally inferior people are just holding back innovation in this country. The idea that you own anything, even your own DNA, is stupid. No poor person should be allowed to own anything -- they'll just misuse it anyway, and deprive society of the benefit of having a corporation own the things they have instead.

      • by Darinbob (1142669) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:07AM (#43011413)

        No, you should own the device you have purchased. This does not mean however that if you jail break it due to a bug that there is any sort of moral imperative for the manufacturer to leave that bug alone. Just find a new back door to use instead.

        • by Microlith (54737) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:08AM (#43011421)

          There wouldn't be this stupid cat and mouse game if Apple would give people a legitimate means of opening up the device. They refuse to, thus people get annoyed when Apple stamps their shiny metal and white boot down again and again.

          • by coinreturn (617535) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @08:59AM (#43013153)

            There wouldn't be this stupid cat and mouse game if Apple would give people a legitimate means of opening up the device. They refuse to, thus people get annoyed when Apple stamps their shiny metal and white boot down again and again.

            Yeah, I know. I'm still fighting with Whirlpool over their defiance about opening up the software on my washing machine. I want to be able to have it do three spin cycles in stead of two.

        • by aristotle-dude (626586) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:33AM (#43011565)

          No, you should own the device you have purchased. This does not mean however that if you jail break it due to a bug that there is any sort of moral imperative for the manufacturer to leave that bug alone. Just find a new back door to use instead.

          If you paid an unsubsidized full price then I would agree with you and perhaps Apple should offer the ability use certificate attached to your iTunes account with the proviso that it only work on devices that you "own" outright. This would mean that you do not gain the ability to install software outside of the app store on a company provided device. You also could not side load apps on a subsidized device because you did not actually pay for it yet. The process could involve registration of the IMEI with your account during setup and then paying a small fee to "unlock" your phone for side loaded binaries. To keep it secure, you would still need to compile and sign the binaries yourself before loading them on your phone.

          This would strike a balance between being able to use "open source" code to create your own versions software and keeping the BSD jails system in place for security.

      • Re:Vulnerabilities (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Moridineas (213502) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:07AM (#43011419) Journal

        I have owned an iPhone 3GS and currently an iPhone5. I have jailbroken both of them. I was very happy when evasi0n was released, and immediately downloaded biteSMS and several other great Cydia apps.

        Everyone who buys an iPhone knows exactly what they are getting in to. Nobody is conned or tricked or forced to buy an iPhone.

        Apple has every right to patch security holes in their OS and software. Even as a jailbreaker, I expect nothing less. Should Apple have left a PDF rendering buffer exploit that allowed the easiest jailbreak in history (jailbreakme.com) open just so people could jailbreak? Obviously not. That's an easy example, but just which security holes should Apple leave open for jailbreakers?

        I wish Apple would allow easy legitimate rooting. But, they don't. I made the choice that I still like the iOS world and hardware. I might feel differently in 2 years, but that's where I am now. Furthermore, Apple does give you some pretty granular control over tracking, ads, location services, etc. You're really getting offtrack on to tangential issues what that tack.

        No need for the disingenuous hysterics about "morally inferior" people, etc. One can imagine that you would be complaining if Apple was NOT patching security holes... Keep it straight--attack the walled garden and Apple's choice to lockdown directly. Don't coat it in a guise of outrage over bug patching.

        • Re:Vulnerabilities (Score:3, Insightful)

          by girlintraining (1395911) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:25AM (#43011541)

          Everyone who buys an iPhone knows exactly what they are getting in to. Nobody is conned or tricked or forced to buy an iPhone.

          And you think it's reasonable for the average person to read and understand a 325 page EULA [apple.com]? You can try foisting the blame back on the user, but I think it is, at best, misrepresenting the situation to suggest that people know "exactly" what they are getting into when they purchase an iPhone. The average person thinks they're getting a phone. A phone that they own, and can use without unreasonable restriction, and that they have a reasonable expectation of privacy. Now, this isn't true, not by a long-shot, but that's what the average person thinks. The average person is, afterall, a rather trusting, and stupid, sort.

          I won't address the rest of your post, other than to say SARCASM! Anyone who hasn't had their sense of humor surgically removed and replaced with a floating point coprocessor can see that my entire previous post contained generous helpings of it.

          • by Moridineas (213502) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:54AM (#43011643) Journal

            And you think it's reasonable for the average person to read and understand a 325 page EULA [apple.com]? You can try foisting the blame back on the user, but I think it is, at best, misrepresenting the situation to suggest that people know "exactly" what they are getting into when they purchase an iPhone.

            I really think the onus is on you for this point. I think you will struggle to find iPhone users who are not aware of the App Store and what it entails. Furthermore, most users just really don't care. At all. If they did, Apple wouldn't keep selling so many phones and have such a high retention rate amongst customers. Check out the retention rates if you don't believe me. They're easy to find.

            The average person thinks they're getting a phone. A phone that they own, and can use without unreasonable restriction, and that they have a reasonable expectation of privacy. Now, this isn't true, not by a long-shot, but that's what the average person thinks.

            No, your confusion arises from the fact that most people don't care about the restrictions. You're again being hysterically disingenuous. Even jailbreakers are a TINY minority of iOS users.

            Privacy-wise, exactly what issue are you complaining about?

            The average person is, afterall, a rather trusting, and stupid, sort.

            You, of course, are bright, savvy, and an extra special snowflake [xkcd.com].

            I won't address the rest of your post, other than to say SARCASM! Anyone who hasn't had their sense of humor surgically removed and replaced with a floating point coprocessor can see that my entire previous post contained generous helpings of it.

            Are you joking now? Your "sarcasm" was painfully obvious. It was the inanity behind the point you were trying to make that I am commenting on.

      • by YesIAmAScript (886271) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @03:57AM (#43012229)

        But if you have a problem with a device that is a walled garden, why did you buy it?

        If you buy DRMed content expecting it'll be cracked, that works, until it doesn't. Meanwhile, you bolster the financial argument for selling DRMed content by buying it. And you diminish the importance of offering unrestricted content.

        If you buy a walled garden device expecting it'll be cracked, that works, until it doesn't. And again, you bolster the financial argument for selling walled garden devices.

        And then after a while, you find that the DRM isn't being cracked so easy anymore. And the walled garden devices you have been buying stop being cracked so easy too, maybe at all. And meanwhile the devices you can control are gone, because no one bought them. Companies got the message they don't need to offer more open devices, and so they didn't.

        If you want to be able to buy open devices in the future, buy open devices today. Don't buy closed devices and then complain when they are re-closed.

      • by nbahi15 (163501) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @05:54AM (#43012575) Homepage

        And if this was hammer and you wanted to use it as a screwdriver or paper weight, fine. However, this is a device sold not as hardware, but an experience. You were not intended to modify it to do unsanctioned things. Period. If decide to take a hammer to the device to modify it into a paper weight that is your prerogative. If your belief is that Apple should support your conversion to a paper weight by making sure the device cracks in a pleasing way and when it doesn't bitch about it, that is your issue, not Apple's.

        Let's also take this ownership claim and the sorry state of the American cellphone industry. You don't buy your cellphone in all likelihood and certainly not historically. You get a phone at least partially owned by the company that gave it to you under the terms of a multi-year contract. If you want a clear ownership situation you need to change the relationship between subscriber and carrier to be one in which they exclusively provide the connectivity and if anything deliver a phone via a payment plan with a clear endpoint.

      • by whisper_jeff (680366) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @08:37AM (#43013049)

        Then don't buy an iPhone.

        I have an iPhone. And an iPad. And an iMac. Because they are the devices that meet my needs and wants. If they didn't, I'd have bought something else. If being able to install whatever OS on my phone was important to me, I'd have bought something else. It isn't. I just want a smartphone that works damn well and that's what I got.

        And, more so, Apple is updating the OS to help ensure that my phone remains secure from outside intrusion - as others have pointed out, even though this means that the jailbreak community is losing a vector to jailbreak the devices, it also means malicious hackers are losing that attack vector. Because that's what it is - an attack vector for potentially malicious code.

        Anyhow, it's simple - if you want a totally open device that allows you to do whatever you want with it, then buy that device. Don't by a different device and then complain it doesn't do what you want. It's like buying a fridge and complaining it does a poor job of browning your toast in the morning. Buy the device that fits your wants and needs.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:33PM (#43011225)

    I'm at a loss of words. Why jailbreak an iPhone when there are better phones out there that don't have nearly as many restrictions on them?

  • by Ka D'Argo (857749) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:42PM (#43011279) Homepage
    I recently picked up an iCade Jr for my iPhone 4S (thinkgeek had marked down on super sale back in January for like ten bucks), which I jumped at. Sadly the official Ion support only has a handful of decent games that are compatible with the Jr. and for whatever reason jailbreaking a 4S or an iPad 2 appears to be super hard due to the A5 chipset. Which is odd cause keep in mind both are well over a year+ old now. I've got an older iPhone 3GS laying around I could jailbreak but it won't run newer games nearly as well as my 4S. The only reason I'd love to jailbreak is so I could use MAME which Cydia has a shit ton more support for the iCade in terms of quantity of games, including many legit games I've purchased from the App Store like X-Men Arcade, Final Fantasy Tactics, etc. I've been waiting a long ass time for an iOS 6 jailbreak that works with the A5 chip, either tethered or non-tethered but none seem to ever get made :(
  • by Kr1ll1n (579971) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @03:04AM (#43012083)

    I purchased used 2 of the AT&T iPhone 4s devices.
    Had them unlocked, and then bought Straight Talk sim cards for them.
    I ended up being forced to jailbreak so I could access the APN settings, which control the ability to send MMS messages.
    Currently, both Straight Talk and AT&T are unwilling to address this issue.

    Jailbreaking allowed me to download a module that unlocked the APN settings page, which then allowed me to actually send and receive MMS messages.
    I would have preferred to not jailbreak, but having spent $750.00 on gear, not being able to use such a simplistic feature was asinine.

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