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iOS 6.1.3 Beta 2 Patches evasi0n Jailbreak

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  • by Hartree (191324) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:08PM (#43011057)

    Apple: Doing our best to remind you it's OUR gadget, not yours.

    • by cshark (673578) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:11PM (#43011073)

      Right. That's exactly it. It's a clear message to power users, and it's hard to mistake it for anything else. What they're saying is, "don't buy our gadgets."

      • by Pausanias (681077) <(pausaniasx) (at) (gmail.com)> on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:18AM (#43011931)

        I used to jailbreak during iOS 4-5 days. Spent a lot of time installing this or that tweak, feeling like such a cool "power user." Oh my, animated wallpaper and SSV Normandy replacing the words "AT&T" on the upper left corner of my screen. This or that tweak that let me access this or that feature with one less gesture than before.

        What a freaking waste of time. And at what cost? Random applications written by anonymous people on the net running as root on your iPhone, with full access to your private data if they wanted it? You are putting yourself at extremely high risk by circumventing the iPhone's security and running all this closed source software as root.

        Jailbreaking is a security nightmare, and you're not worthy of the term "power user" if you allow someone called chpwn or BigBoss to run closed source shit as root on your personal communication device. By the way, that jerk BigBoss wouldn't let me run his software if I blocked ads on my hosts file. WTF dude, let us live a little?

        If you really want flexibility, at least go to Android, where they publish their source.

        It finally took cold turkey---bought an iPhone 5 when it came out, with no jailbreak for months---to learn that I really like my iPhone the way God intended it: nice and stable and closed---and even if not 100% secure, still better than giving some random dude called p0sixninja full access to my device. I get more stuff done now---you know, real work that I need to get done for my real career and not messing with a half-assed implementation of Expose that causes my phone to reboot half the time (yeah---the instability and the random reboots are yet another downside of jailbreaking).

        • by blind biker (1066130) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:48AM (#43012021) Journal

          to learn that I really like my iPhone the way God intended it:

          You are allowed to cal God by His real name - Steve Jobs.

        • My take home from your post - you think Apple is God... And possibly you want protection from yourself.
          Is that pretty much it?

        • by morgauxo (974071)

          High risk? Nothing bad has happened to me! I think you are just spreading FUD!

          Some of us actually need functionality that Apple choses not to allow. For example.. I jailbreak to get encarcerapp. It's an app that allows me to lock out the home button or even the touch screen. Then I can hand the pad to my 3 y/o daughter and she can play a game or watch a movie while I drive the car and she isn't getting herself out of the app and then asking me to get it going again every couple of seconds. Somebody at Ap

      • by gl4ss (559668)

        Right. That's exactly it. It's a clear message to power users, and it's hard to mistake it for anything else. What they're saying is, "don't buy our gadgets."

        they already said so when they made it a policy.

        the idea that they'd on purpose leave these breaks in for power users is laughable idiocy. of course they're going to patch them. you want to play with the devices then you pay the developer fee.

    • by amicusNYCL (1538833) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:12PM (#43011079)

      I've always wondered why jailbreaking exists. If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone? The reason I've never even considered an iPhone is because of Apple's attitude towards it.

      • by cshark (673578) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:15PM (#43011097)

        Well, the way I remember it, jail-breaking came about because someone noticed that you can run a full on unix command line on an i-phone. This was before we had Android phones, and it was really fucking novel at the time. I can't tell you how many times I had to sit there, and hear the fan boys ask me things like, "So, can you ssh into your Nokia?" To which I always told them, "Look dude, if I wanted a command line, it would have a real fucking keyboard."

        • by cheater512 (783349) <nick@nickstallman.net> on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:32PM (#43011215) Homepage

          They didn't know about the N900? The one where you could ssh in and had xterm installed by default?

          Yeah it had a real keyboard too. :P

          • by Microlith (54737) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:44PM (#43011291)

            The iPhone and its local SSH server predated the N900 by about 2 years.

      • by dreamchaser (49529) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:17PM (#43011105) Homepage Journal

        I've always wondered why jailbreaking exists. If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone? The reason I've never even considered an iPhone is because of Apple's attitude towards it.

        It shouldn't matter. If you buy something it is yours, and you should be able to do whatever you want with it. I prefer Android (I use an Asus Transformer Prime as my tablet) but work gave me an iPhone. I don't care for it, but not because of the walled garden. I just like Android better. That being said, if I did decide to buy my own iOS device I should be able to do whatever I want with it and its software. That is why jailbreaking exists.

        • by DigiShaman (671371) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:56PM (#43011351) Homepage

          Depends on if you believe in the concept of a 'contract' or not. The problem isn't that Apple refuses to let you use the hardware as you see fit. The problem is that Apple hasn't clarified the expected and blatant terms of use. It's pretty obfuscated if you ask me.

          Let me give you an example of future GPU (Video cards) and CPU technology. Suppose the yields are so good, and yet the R&D costs are naturally expensive. What if there was just one hardware production run whereas "cores" are unlocked based on the serial code you enter into the BIOS. Want an upgrade? Upgrade your serial code. It saves you money, it saves the manufacture money. Impulse purchasing and upgrading all from the seat of your desk. Everyone wins right? Economic theory would say yes. But the idea you own the hardware - yet can't touch it (because you're not licensed for it) is a big taboo among crowd here.

          • by the_B0fh (208483)

            you used to sell IBM printers, didn't you?

          • by mwvdlee (775178)

            So... how much do you need to pay Apple to unlock an iPhone?

            Unlike you GPU/CPU analogy, this is about paying full price for the hardware but not even being able to pay in order to access all of it.

            • Unlocking is not the same as jailbreaking. You can buy an unlocked phone from Apple at the unsubsidized price. However you can not purchase a jailbroken phone.

              Jailbreaking is only important for a small percentage of users. It's about the same percentage as Android phone owners rooting their phone.

          • by gl4ss (559668)

            "Upgrade your serial code. It saves you money,"

            the consumer loses. it's not impulse buying if you already own the silicon.

          • by sjames (1099)

            Actually, economic theory says that in a healthy market the manufacturer would be forced to unlock all of the cores at no additional cost or have the competition eat their lunch with their better bang for the buck products.

            In a healthy market, prices are driven towards the marginal cost of production.

            • In a healthy wireless market we would be paying a lower price for service as well as paying a reasonable price for a phone. The market is unhealthy on two fronts.
          • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

            IBM used to do exactly that. People got pissed off when they paid for a CPU upgrade to their mainframe and a man from IBM turned up to move a jumper.

      • by EzInKy (115248)

        If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone?

        Perhaps Apple's view is to let those who can, do....and those who can't don't?

        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Microlith (54737)

          That's obviously not Apple's view. Their view is obviously that no one does anything without Apple's permission.

          • by EzInKy (115248)

            Are you sure you just don't have Apple wrong? They could be just out to improve the species! Those that figure out how to work around their lockdowns get to proceed, those that don't, don't.

      • by MightyYar (622222) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:29PM (#43011201)

        Most Android devices are locked, too. Sometimes you buy a product for other considerations and if you can root it... great.

        • Few are locked properly. 95% get rooted with no troubles.

        • by Microlith (54737) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:41PM (#43011267)

          Caveats, caveats everywhere.

          Android, even on devices with a locked bootloader, allows for installation of software from sources other than the Play Store. On iOS devices, you cannot install any software from sources other than the App Store, period.

          Android vendors that lock the bootloader quite often catch a lot of shit, so I don't really see how this is equivalent.

          • by MightyYar (622222)

            Caveats, caveats everywhere.

            Yes, well, such is the nature of comparing a very specific product (the iPhone) with a line of hundreds of very diverse products. I had two iPhones, and now I have an Android (as well as a Kindle Fire HD... not sure if that counts as Android).

            Anyway, I find both environments very lacking without root. I've also found the alternative Android markets to be mostly crap, even going so far as to install the Google market on my Kindle.

            • by drinkypoo (153816)

              I've also found the alternative Android markets to be mostly crap, even going so far as to install the Google market on my Kindle.

              I think the Amazon Appstore is pretty great, but the Amazon Appstore App is a total piece of shit. It fires off and then chokes when I'm not using it so that I get popups about how it's not responding.

          • by Ash Vince (602485) *

            Android, even on devices with a locked bootloader, allows for installation of software from sources other than the Play Store.

            Only if you turn that feature on. Most devices default to not allowing this and throw up a warning if you try and enable it. You are free to ignore the warning but then it is your own dumb fault if you screw up.

            I just checked my Samsung Galaxy S3 and I never seem to have needed to allow the installing of untrusted apps after 6 months of ownership so I probably never will.

            The real "problem" with Android is that Google leave the play store far more open than the Apple equivalent and force users to engage thei

        • It would be a nice argument and all if a locked Android phone wasn't about as permissive as a jailbroken iPhone.
          • by MightyYar (622222)

            My challenge on Android has been to find a good backup scheme without root. With the iPhone you got backup "automatically" through iTunes.

            • Considering you have access to the user file system you just need a normal PC backup application to backup user data, and calendar, contacts and tasks are synchronized to the cloud by default whenever you connect to the Internet.
            • by drinkypoo (153816)

              Android phones' important data gets backed up, and any apps you have downloaded from the store are available for reinstallation from the list of stuff you've previously installed. So while you can't back up system apps without root, you don't really need to, either.

              I wouldn't buy a device I couldn't root, not just because of backups but because it's my goddamned device. So to me, this is a non-problem.

      • I've always wondered why jailbreaking exists. If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone? The reason I've never even considered an iPhone is because of Apple's attitude towards it.

        Because Jony Ive makes a super spanky tablet and all the developer love is initially born in iOS. I hate the walled garden and jailbroke because of it, but Holy
        Chocolate Buddha if it isn't the best build quality of all the tablets right now.

        If Google finally did something with the red headed Moto stepchild and brought out a RAZR inspired tablet with substantial battery life? I might be there when it happens in a few years. (Why they drag their feet here, I have no clue.)

        So in short, it's the sexiest

        • by jonwil (467024) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @01:36AM (#43011783)

          Please explain what makes the Nexus 7 and Nexus 10 tablets worse than an iPad...

          • by FyRE666 (263011) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:03AM (#43011873) Homepage

            I own a Nexus 7, Nexus 10 and the latest iPad (also owned previous iPads, iPhones, and numerous other Android phones/tablets). The build quality and battery life of the iPad is certainly higher than the Nexus devices. It's pretty obvious if you've used both extensively. I've also had more glitches on the Android devices (e.g. current Google Nexus phone not ringing when people call after it's been running for a week or so, sometimes staying on lock screen when a call comes in, occasional UI quirks). Also the iPad mail app is much better than the Android offerings. Nexus 7 has terrible sound quality through external speaker - not a show stopper, but really should be addressed.

            That said, I much prefer using the Android devices for day to day use. I also spend far more time developing for Android than iOS (in fact let my iOS dev license expire now) and I recommend Android to clients for the type of work I do - my apps are generally not available to the public. I hate being tethered to iTunes, forced to distribute apps via the Apple iTunes store, and Apples general lack of innovation or improvement (not adopting NFC for example).

            So that's my experience; day to day I carry a Nexus 7 around with me, along with my Nexus phone. If I'm anticipating doing a lot of email, I'll either take my laptop, or the iPad2 instead. Im not a fanboi of either camp - just use what I think is most suitable.

            • by AmiMoJo (196126) * <mojo@@@world3...net> on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @08:43AM (#43013083) Homepage

              The Nexus 10 is on a par with any iPad for build quality. The Nexus 7 does feel a little bit less high end but then again costs half what an iPad Mini does, and it has a better screen. It is by no means cheap and the textured back cover makes it very easy to hold.

              Battery life seems about the same for each, except that you can replace the Nexus 7 battery easily so there is no need to go easy on it.

          • The primary use case for my tablet is reading documents. For that, the 4:3 retina screen is better than the 16:9 and 16:10 screens on all the Android tablets I'm aware of.

            If there's an Android tablet with a 4:3 high DPI screen (1024x768 does not cut it for US Letter or A4 typeset documents in single page full screen mode), I'd be interested to hear about it, because I like Android better than iOS for a variety of reasons.

            Also, can anyone recommend a great PDF app for Android? I use GoodReader on my iPad and

            • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

              You know the Nexus 10 has a better-than-retina DPI screen, right? And that 16:10 is actually ideal for viewing A4 documents in portrait (full screen) or landscape (side-by-side), right?

          • I can't speak for those two, specifically, since I passed them up when I learned they were going the stupid route of "no sd cards." Compared to the tablets I *have* used, though, from the lowly Asus A200(work) to the Samsung Note 10.1(returned) to the Transformer Infinity(owned), on the other hand, the iPad(work) is superior in just one very important aspect:

            "Keyboard" responsiveness. I don't know if Android's keyboard process needs to be niced a little lower or what, but when I'm out-typing the system on a

      • by AK Marc (707885)
        What should someone do if they like the iPhone, but can't get AT&T? My solution (for my wife's phone, I'm on Android), was to get an iPhone and jailbreak it. This was before there was any "legal" way to buy an unlocked one.
        • What should someone do if they like the iPhone, but can't get AT&T?

          Maybe pay the tiniest sliver of attention to the world so you can learn that the iPhone has come on all major US carriers (ie, AT&T and Verizon) for years now?

          Dan Aris

      • For most people phones -of any kind- are appliances. For them the lack of freedom to run any arbitrary code is a good feature, and are well served by Apple's model.

      • by tlhIngan (30335)

        I've always wondered why jailbreaking exists. If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone? The reason I've never even considered an iPhone is because of Apple's attitude towards it.

        Because the walled garden is just one aspect of the entire thing. If you want a decent phone with a screen that's not humongous and actually usable single-handedly, your options are REALLY limited. A phone with a 4" or smaller screen on Android doesn't exist if you want a decent CPU,

      • by SilenceBE (1439827) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:56AM (#43012053)
        Because of the bigger range of quality apps to be honest.

        And btw I'm an android developer but my main tablet for example is still an iPad. The thing that harms andriod seriously is fragmentation, bad documentation (quality, not quantity) , less strictness which results that a lot of hw companies are sloppy, weak support for older devices, no really good design guidelines,... . For me it is the Drupal of the mobile world. Not a bad platform, but it sometimes drives me nuts.

        People that say things like "they think the software is better... And are greatly mistaken" have never used the two platforms on a daily basis. Android is slowly getting there, but the really big problem is that a lot of devices are still suck on 2.3 gingerbread. It would be nice if android hw companies would support their older devices as Apple does with older hardware. An iPad 1 being stuck on iOS 5 is nothing in comparison with a lot of android situations. And the number of normal people (non geeks) that root their phone is zero to none.

        To be honest with Android I have the feeling that a lot of love gets into the advertisment or google services part of the os, but it lacks in the other departements. The Android API (especially the older versions) sometimes amazes me in stupidity.
        • by AmiMoJo (196126) * <mojo@@@world3...net> on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @08:34AM (#43013041) Homepage

          Android is like VHS and iOS is like BetaMAX. VHS was open and anyone could implement it, resulting in some really terrible VCRs but also some really good ones. BetaMAX was pretty much limited to just Sony and eventually lost out because VHS outsold it.

          BTW, having recently done some Android development I think the documentation is fine, certainly no worse than most systems. Admittedly I have not done any iOS development for comparison, but most of the people raging about Android on Stack Exchange are the ones who don't really get the mobile app paradigm.

      • by epyT-R (613989)

        because many have bought an iphone or other closed device, then later found out about the coolness of running alternative software..

    • by Kyusaku Natsume (1098) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:56PM (#43011355)

      Yeah, it is not like the vulnerabilities used by jailbreak tools could ever be also used by malware or anything.

      • by dissy (172727)

        No not really. Once you jailbreak, either Cydia or the jailbreak tool itself patches the hole it used in that OS image. It is fixed until you wipe the device and start over.

      • Yeah, it is not like the vulnerabilities used by jailbreak tools could ever be also used by malware or anything.

        This. All the fandroids cry, "Apple is bad at security - just look at the jailbreaks!" Then Apple plugs the jailbreaks and they all rage, "Apple is evil, closing the jailbreaks!" No matter what Apple does, it's bad in the eyes of the raging fandroid. If Tim Cook announced that he wiped his ass north-to-south, they'd be complaining he didn't do it south-to-north.

    • Apple: All your iGadgets, are belong to us!
    • by crazyjj (2598719) *

      You will bow down before Apple, users, no matter that it takes an eternity! YOU WILL BOW DOWN BEFORE APPLE!!!

  • Vulnerabilities (Score:5, Insightful)

    by thadman08 (732965) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:25PM (#43011175) Homepage

    Why is there so much outrage at this? Jailbreaking works by first finding bugs and vulnerabilities and then exploiting them. Yes, Apple is preventing jailbreaking, but they're also securing their OS.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by cheater512 (783349)

      Because vulnerabilities that don't allow jail breaking don't get fixed terribly quickly?

      • Re:Vulnerabilities (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Desler (1608317) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:06AM (#43011409)

        Such as?

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      Why is there so much outrage at this?

      There's this strange, antiquidated notion some people have that a device they spend hundreds of dollars on, are in physical possession of, and which contains a ton of personal information and is the de facto way for the world to get ahold of them, belongs to them. So when these social degenerates are told that they have no say in how their data is used, whether or not they're tracked, what applications they can and cannot use, etc., they get upset.

      We should probably just ignore them. Such morally inferior p

      • by Darinbob (1142669)

        No, you should own the device you have purchased. This does not mean however that if you jail break it due to a bug that there is any sort of moral imperative for the manufacturer to leave that bug alone. Just find a new back door to use instead.

        • by Microlith (54737)

          There wouldn't be this stupid cat and mouse game if Apple would give people a legitimate means of opening up the device. They refuse to, thus people get annoyed when Apple stamps their shiny metal and white boot down again and again.

          • There wouldn't be this stupid cat and mouse game if Apple would give people a legitimate means of opening up the device. They refuse to, thus people get annoyed when Apple stamps their shiny metal and white boot down again and again.

            Yeah, I know. I'm still fighting with Whirlpool over their defiance about opening up the software on my washing machine. I want to be able to have it do three spin cycles in stead of two.

        • No, you should own the device you have purchased. This does not mean however that if you jail break it due to a bug that there is any sort of moral imperative for the manufacturer to leave that bug alone. Just find a new back door to use instead.

          If you paid an unsubsidized full price then I would agree with you and perhaps Apple should offer the ability use certificate attached to your iTunes account with the proviso that it only work on devices that you "own" outright. This would mean that you do not gain the ability to install software outside of the app store on a company provided device. You also could not side load apps on a subsidized device because you did not actually pay for it yet. The process could involve registration of the IMEI with y

          • by psiclops (1011105)

            when you buy a subsidized phone on a plan you are still buying the phone. the only difference is you are buying it as part of a package.

            Kind of like if how I bought two suits in a 2 for 1 sale, i should be able to take both of them to the alterations shop.

          • by drinkypoo (153816)

            You also could not side load apps on a subsidized device because you did not actually pay for it yet.

            Once you can no longer return the device, you have paid for it. If you terminate your contract you will be billed; if you fail to pay you will be sued and a judgment granted against you. Saying that you did not pay for the phone when it is subsidized is a dirty lie.

      • Re:Vulnerabilities (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Moridineas (213502) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:07AM (#43011419) Journal

        I have owned an iPhone 3GS and currently an iPhone5. I have jailbroken both of them. I was very happy when evasi0n was released, and immediately downloaded biteSMS and several other great Cydia apps.

        Everyone who buys an iPhone knows exactly what they are getting in to. Nobody is conned or tricked or forced to buy an iPhone.

        Apple has every right to patch security holes in their OS and software. Even as a jailbreaker, I expect nothing less. Should Apple have left a PDF rendering buffer exploit that allowed the easiest jailbreak in history (jailbreakme.com) open just so people could jailbreak? Obviously not. That's an easy example, but just which security holes should Apple leave open for jailbreakers?

        I wish Apple would allow easy legitimate rooting. But, they don't. I made the choice that I still like the iOS world and hardware. I might feel differently in 2 years, but that's where I am now. Furthermore, Apple does give you some pretty granular control over tracking, ads, location services, etc. You're really getting offtrack on to tangential issues what that tack.

        No need for the disingenuous hysterics about "morally inferior" people, etc. One can imagine that you would be complaining if Apple was NOT patching security holes... Keep it straight--attack the walled garden and Apple's choice to lockdown directly. Don't coat it in a guise of outrage over bug patching.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          Everyone who buys an iPhone knows exactly what they are getting in to. Nobody is conned or tricked or forced to buy an iPhone.

          And you think it's reasonable for the average person to read and understand a 325 page EULA [apple.com]? You can try foisting the blame back on the user, but I think it is, at best, misrepresenting the situation to suggest that people know "exactly" what they are getting into when they purchase an iPhone. The average person thinks they're getting a phone. A phone that they own, and can use without unreasonable restriction, and that they have a reasonable expectation of privacy. Now, this isn't true, not by a long-shot,

          • And you think it's reasonable for the average person to read and understand a 325 page EULA [apple.com]? You can try foisting the blame back on the user, but I think it is, at best, misrepresenting the situation to suggest that people know "exactly" what they are getting into when they purchase an iPhone.

            I really think the onus is on you for this point. I think you will struggle to find iPhone users who are not aware of the App Store and what it entails. Furthermore, most users just really don't care. At all. If they did, Apple wouldn't keep selling so many phones and have such a high retention rate amongst customers. Check out the retention rates if you don't believe me. They're easy to find.

            The average person thinks they're getting a phone. A phone that they own, and can use without unreasonable restriction, and that they have a reasonable expectation of privacy. Now, this isn't true, not by a long-shot, but that's what the average person thinks.

            No, your confusion arises from the fact that most people don't care about the restrictions. You're again being hyste

            • by Microlith (54737)

              I think you will struggle to find iPhone users who are not aware of the App Store and what it entails. Furthermore, most users just really don't care.

              I believe you are mistaken. Most people neither know nor care. Incidentally, that mode of thinking is why our political situation is such crap right now and not something to be deferred to or respected.

      • by YesIAmAScript (886271) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @03:57AM (#43012229)

        But if you have a problem with a device that is a walled garden, why did you buy it?

        If you buy DRMed content expecting it'll be cracked, that works, until it doesn't. Meanwhile, you bolster the financial argument for selling DRMed content by buying it. And you diminish the importance of offering unrestricted content.

        If you buy a walled garden device expecting it'll be cracked, that works, until it doesn't. And again, you bolster the financial argument for selling walled garden devices.

        And then after a while, you find that the DRM isn't being cracked so easy anymore. And the walled garden devices you have been buying stop being cracked so easy too, maybe at all. And meanwhile the devices you can control are gone, because no one bought them. Companies got the message they don't need to offer more open devices, and so they didn't.

        If you want to be able to buy open devices in the future, buy open devices today. Don't buy closed devices and then complain when they are re-closed.

      • by nbahi15 (163501)

        And if this was hammer and you wanted to use it as a screwdriver or paper weight, fine. However, this is a device sold not as hardware, but an experience. You were not intended to modify it to do unsanctioned things. Period. If decide to take a hammer to the device to modify it into a paper weight that is your prerogative. If your belief is that Apple should support your conversion to a paper weight by making sure the device cracks in a pleasing way and when it doesn't bitch about it, that is your issue, no

      • Then don't buy an iPhone.

        I have an iPhone. And an iPad. And an iMac. Because they are the devices that meet my needs and wants. If they didn't, I'd have bought something else. If being able to install whatever OS on my phone was important to me, I'd have bought something else. It isn't. I just want a smartphone that works damn well and that's what I got.

        And, more so, Apple is updating the OS to help ensure that my phone remains secure from outside intrusion - as others have pointed out, even though this mea

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I'm at a loss of words. Why jailbreak an iPhone when there are better phones out there that don't have nearly as many restrictions on them?

  • I recently picked up an iCade Jr for my iPhone 4S (thinkgeek had marked down on super sale back in January for like ten bucks), which I jumped at. Sadly the official Ion support only has a handful of decent games that are compatible with the Jr. and for whatever reason jailbreaking a 4S or an iPad 2 appears to be super hard due to the A5 chipset. Which is odd cause keep in mind both are well over a year+ old now. I've got an older iPhone 3GS laying around I could jailbreak but it won't run newer games nearl
  • by Kr1ll1n (579971) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @03:04AM (#43012083)

    I purchased used 2 of the AT&T iPhone 4s devices.
    Had them unlocked, and then bought Straight Talk sim cards for them.
    I ended up being forced to jailbreak so I could access the APN settings, which control the ability to send MMS messages.
    Currently, both Straight Talk and AT&T are unwilling to address this issue.

    Jailbreaking allowed me to download a module that unlocked the APN settings page, which then allowed me to actually send and receive MMS messages.
    I would have preferred to not jailbreak, but having spent $750.00 on gear, not being able to use such a simplistic feature was asinine.

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