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iOS 6.1.3 Beta 2 Patches evasi0n Jailbreak

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  • by cshark (673578) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:11PM (#43011073)

    Right. That's exactly it. It's a clear message to power users, and it's hard to mistake it for anything else. What they're saying is, "don't buy our gadgets."

  • by amicusNYCL (1538833) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:12PM (#43011079)

    I've always wondered why jailbreaking exists. If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone? The reason I've never even considered an iPhone is because of Apple's attitude towards it.

  • by dreamchaser (49529) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:17PM (#43011105) Homepage Journal

    I've always wondered why jailbreaking exists. If people wanted to do whatever they wanted to their phones, why would they get an iPhone? The reason I've never even considered an iPhone is because of Apple's attitude towards it.

    It shouldn't matter. If you buy something it is yours, and you should be able to do whatever you want with it. I prefer Android (I use an Asus Transformer Prime as my tablet) but work gave me an iPhone. I don't care for it, but not because of the walled garden. I just like Android better. That being said, if I did decide to buy my own iOS device I should be able to do whatever I want with it and its software. That is why jailbreaking exists.

  • Vulnerabilities (Score:5, Insightful)

    by thadman08 (732965) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:25PM (#43011175) Homepage

    Why is there so much outrage at this? Jailbreaking works by first finding bugs and vulnerabilities and then exploiting them. Yes, Apple is preventing jailbreaking, but they're also securing their OS.

  • by Nerdfest (867930) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:28PM (#43011189)

    Jailbreaking is done by exploiting security holes. If the holes are left, they'll be exploited by others for less noble means. There have been a couple of jailbreaks that merely involved visiting a web site. They must be patched.

  • by Microlith (54737) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:28PM (#43011195)

    That's obviously not Apple's view. Their view is obviously that no one does anything without Apple's permission.

  • by MightyYar (622222) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:29PM (#43011201)

    Most Android devices are locked, too. Sometimes you buy a product for other considerations and if you can root it... great.

  • Re:Vulnerabilities (Score:2, Insightful)

    by cheater512 (783349) <nick@nickstallman.net> on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:35PM (#43011235) Homepage

    Because vulnerabilities that don't allow jail breaking don't get fixed terribly quickly?

  • by Microlith (54737) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:41PM (#43011267)

    Caveats, caveats everywhere.

    Android, even on devices with a locked bootloader, allows for installation of software from sources other than the Play Store. On iOS devices, you cannot install any software from sources other than the App Store, period.

    Android vendors that lock the bootloader quite often catch a lot of shit, so I don't really see how this is equivalent.

  • Re:Vulnerabilities (Score:2, Insightful)

    by girlintraining (1395911) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:42PM (#43011277)

    Why is there so much outrage at this?

    There's this strange, antiquidated notion some people have that a device they spend hundreds of dollars on, are in physical possession of, and which contains a ton of personal information and is the de facto way for the world to get ahold of them, belongs to them. So when these social degenerates are told that they have no say in how their data is used, whether or not they're tracked, what applications they can and cannot use, etc., they get upset.

    We should probably just ignore them. Such morally inferior people are just holding back innovation in this country. The idea that you own anything, even your own DNA, is stupid. No poor person should be allowed to own anything -- they'll just misuse it anyway, and deprive society of the benefit of having a corporation own the things they have instead.

  • by DigiShaman (671371) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:56PM (#43011351) Homepage

    Depends on if you believe in the concept of a 'contract' or not. The problem isn't that Apple refuses to let you use the hardware as you see fit. The problem is that Apple hasn't clarified the expected and blatant terms of use. It's pretty obfuscated if you ask me.

    Let me give you an example of future GPU (Video cards) and CPU technology. Suppose the yields are so good, and yet the R&D costs are naturally expensive. What if there was just one hardware production run whereas "cores" are unlocked based on the serial code you enter into the BIOS. Want an upgrade? Upgrade your serial code. It saves you money, it saves the manufacture money. Impulse purchasing and upgrading all from the seat of your desk. Everyone wins right? Economic theory would say yes. But the idea you own the hardware - yet can't touch it (because you're not licensed for it) is a big taboo among crowd here.

  • by Kyusaku Natsume (1098) on Monday February 25, 2013 @11:56PM (#43011355)

    Yeah, it is not like the vulnerabilities used by jailbreak tools could ever be also used by malware or anything.

  • Re:Vulnerabilities (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Moridineas (213502) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:07AM (#43011419) Journal

    I have owned an iPhone 3GS and currently an iPhone5. I have jailbroken both of them. I was very happy when evasi0n was released, and immediately downloaded biteSMS and several other great Cydia apps.

    Everyone who buys an iPhone knows exactly what they are getting in to. Nobody is conned or tricked or forced to buy an iPhone.

    Apple has every right to patch security holes in their OS and software. Even as a jailbreaker, I expect nothing less. Should Apple have left a PDF rendering buffer exploit that allowed the easiest jailbreak in history (jailbreakme.com) open just so people could jailbreak? Obviously not. That's an easy example, but just which security holes should Apple leave open for jailbreakers?

    I wish Apple would allow easy legitimate rooting. But, they don't. I made the choice that I still like the iOS world and hardware. I might feel differently in 2 years, but that's where I am now. Furthermore, Apple does give you some pretty granular control over tracking, ads, location services, etc. You're really getting offtrack on to tangential issues what that tack.

    No need for the disingenuous hysterics about "morally inferior" people, etc. One can imagine that you would be complaining if Apple was NOT patching security holes... Keep it straight--attack the walled garden and Apple's choice to lockdown directly. Don't coat it in a guise of outrage over bug patching.

  • Re:Vulnerabilities (Score:3, Insightful)

    by girlintraining (1395911) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @12:25AM (#43011541)

    Everyone who buys an iPhone knows exactly what they are getting in to. Nobody is conned or tricked or forced to buy an iPhone.

    And you think it's reasonable for the average person to read and understand a 325 page EULA [apple.com]? You can try foisting the blame back on the user, but I think it is, at best, misrepresenting the situation to suggest that people know "exactly" what they are getting into when they purchase an iPhone. The average person thinks they're getting a phone. A phone that they own, and can use without unreasonable restriction, and that they have a reasonable expectation of privacy. Now, this isn't true, not by a long-shot, but that's what the average person thinks. The average person is, afterall, a rather trusting, and stupid, sort.

    I won't address the rest of your post, other than to say SARCASM! Anyone who hasn't had their sense of humor surgically removed and replaced with a floating point coprocessor can see that my entire previous post contained generous helpings of it.

  • by Microlith (54737) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @01:17AM (#43011713)

    On the plus side, there is no need for antivirus software in devices running iOS

    There's no need to run antivirus software on Android either.

    something that I saw advertised prominently the last time I was in Akihabara.

    Are you sure they didn't mean Mac OS X? Cause that was the claim for the longest of times.

    Certainly, the rules to get a iOS developer license could be relaxed in such a way to demand less than $100 for it and make room for hoobists, but locked down nature of the devices and the efforts made to get accountability from the developers are a service to Apple's customers.

    Or they could offer a simple switch enabled in the environment or from iTunes that lets end users do as they wish. It would have no impact on most people because the App Store is far too easy. But they won't, because Apple enjoys having absolute control over end users, developers, and their interactions.

  • by jonwil (467024) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @01:36AM (#43011783)

    Please explain what makes the Nexus 7 and Nexus 10 tablets worse than an iPad...

  • by Pausanias (681077) <<pausaniasx> <at> <gmail.com>> on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @02:18AM (#43011931)

    I used to jailbreak during iOS 4-5 days. Spent a lot of time installing this or that tweak, feeling like such a cool "power user." Oh my, animated wallpaper and SSV Normandy replacing the words "AT&T" on the upper left corner of my screen. This or that tweak that let me access this or that feature with one less gesture than before.

    What a freaking waste of time. And at what cost? Random applications written by anonymous people on the net running as root on your iPhone, with full access to your private data if they wanted it? You are putting yourself at extremely high risk by circumventing the iPhone's security and running all this closed source software as root.

    Jailbreaking is a security nightmare, and you're not worthy of the term "power user" if you allow someone called chpwn or BigBoss to run closed source shit as root on your personal communication device. By the way, that jerk BigBoss wouldn't let me run his software if I blocked ads on my hosts file. WTF dude, let us live a little?

    If you really want flexibility, at least go to Android, where they publish their source.

    It finally took cold turkey---bought an iPhone 5 when it came out, with no jailbreak for months---to learn that I really like my iPhone the way God intended it: nice and stable and closed---and even if not 100% secure, still better than giving some random dude called p0sixninja full access to my device. I get more stuff done now---you know, real work that I need to get done for my real career and not messing with a half-assed implementation of Expose that causes my phone to reboot half the time (yeah---the instability and the random reboots are yet another downside of jailbreaking).

  • by AK Marc (707885) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @03:31AM (#43012155)
    There are viruses and anti-virus for Android. The closest to that is a small amount of malware for iOS that requires jailbreaking and manually installing. Apple is safer for not offering the choice.
  • by YesIAmAScript (886271) on Tuesday February 26, 2013 @03:57AM (#43012229)

    But if you have a problem with a device that is a walled garden, why did you buy it?

    If you buy DRMed content expecting it'll be cracked, that works, until it doesn't. Meanwhile, you bolster the financial argument for selling DRMed content by buying it. And you diminish the importance of offering unrestricted content.

    If you buy a walled garden device expecting it'll be cracked, that works, until it doesn't. And again, you bolster the financial argument for selling walled garden devices.

    And then after a while, you find that the DRM isn't being cracked so easy anymore. And the walled garden devices you have been buying stop being cracked so easy too, maybe at all. And meanwhile the devices you can control are gone, because no one bought them. Companies got the message they don't need to offer more open devices, and so they didn't.

    If you want to be able to buy open devices in the future, buy open devices today. Don't buy closed devices and then complain when they are re-closed.

If a camel is a horse designed by a committee, then a consensus forecast is a camel's behind. -- Edgar R. Fiedler

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