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Apple To Discontinue Mac Pro In EU Over Safety Regulations 371

Posted by Soulskill
from the not-all-product-lines-are-created-equal dept.
jones_supa writes "Apple has been forced to remove the Mac Pro from sale in the European Union after an amendment to a safety regulation left the machines non-compliant. The updated electronics safety standard IEC 60950-1 increases requirements around electrical port protection (PDF) and the fan guards in the system. Apple does not plan to modify their machines and will simply pull them from market in the EU. Apple wishes to warn customers and partners about the change so that they would have sufficient time to order Mac Pro units and meet any needs prior to 1 March, when the amendment comes into effect."
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Apple To Discontinue Mac Pro In EU Over Safety Regulations

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  • by Mateo_LeFou (859634) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:33AM (#42770869) Homepage

    Macs have fans?

    • by Sponge Bath (413667) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:37AM (#42770879)

      Macs have fans?

      Cooling fans and fanboys.

    • by Carewolf (581105) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:51AM (#42770939) Homepage

      Macs have fans?

      Yes, and they are hard to miss since they whine loudly if put to work. I am ofcourse refering to the the cooling fans, not the fanboys.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by FreakyGeeky (23009)
        If you used a Mac Pro that did this, it was defective. Mine (early 2009 eight core) hardly makes any noise at all under load.
        • He might be talking about the Macbook Pro in response to the question 'Macs have fans?'. I know for me some operations feel like an airplane ride - when the task starts I can hear it starting to take off, it spends some time in the air as it does its work, and it lands and the engines shut off when its done. Colleagues say that the CD drive makes a loud noise as well, but I don't use it all that much.

        • by gman003 (1693318)

          Either that, or just dust buildup.

          I've got an old 2006 Mac Pro, and it used to idle around 80C and, under a heavy workload, the fans would spin up to a full 2000RPM. I recently gave it a very, *very* thorough cleaning job, removing six years' of accumulated dust and reapplying thermal paste. Now it idles at 60C and even with Prime95 running full-blast I could not get the fans to go above 900RPM, and temperatures peaked at 82C.

          The Mac Pros, or at least the 1,1 model, is not designed in a way that makes it ea

        • by Greyfox (87712)
          The mac pro desktop I had would routinely not spin its fans up and would subsequently cook its video card. I think I got it in 2005. The mac pro laptop I have would reach alarmingly hot temperatures. I didn't know if they were normal or not but I found them alarmingly hot. So I installed a little program to spin the fans up sooner. That's when I noticed the laptop has fans. When those things really get going, you can definitely hear them. It's just by default, the system almost never cranks them up.
    • by blind biker (1066130) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:54AM (#42770955) Journal

      "Fan guards" - thoroughly indoctrinated followers of the cult of Jobs, willing to sacrifice their lives for what they believe in.

      It takes many a queuing at the Temples of Jobs (also known as Apple® Stores) before one reaches such lofty spiritual/materialistic station.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by macs4all (973270)
      Yes, but I DARE you to get to ONE of them without cutting power to the computer [apple.com]. This is utter, unmitigated bullshit on the part of the EU. By the way, note that in the Apple DIY document I linked-to, Steps 1 and 2 of the instructions are "1. Shut Down Computer" "2. Wait 10 minutes". So please tell me how STUPID someone would have to be to actually encounter a SPINNING fan (or maybe they EU is worried about all those razor-sharp PLASTIC fan blades?)

      Oh, and Apple HASN'T said that they WON'T be selling the
  • by Bogtha (906264) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:40AM (#42770887)

    Apple does not plan to modify their machines and will simply pull them from market in the EU.

    In all likelihood it's because they've got a new Mac Pro model ready to launch. The Mac Pro hasn't had a significant update in years, it's the only Mac that doesn't have a Thunderbolt port, for example.

    A new Mac Pro is being released in 2013 [forbes.com], confirmed by Apple.

    • by Seb C. (5555) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:44AM (#42770899)

      Yeah, so instead of telling their customer :" Hold on, we'll deliver a brand new one", they go for "Rush for the shops, we won't comply the EU directives and there'll be no more of those Mac Pro in store in a couple of weeks".
      Yeah thank you Apple...

      It's not as if they would release 2 ipad versions in one year, completely killing the brand new tablet you bought 6 month earlier...

      • by PhotoJim (813785) <jim@photo[ ].ca ['jim' in gap]> on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:54AM (#42770953) Homepage

        If you bought your "brand new tablet" as a user device instead of an investment, you shouldn't really care if new versions come out.

        I'm still happily using my first-gen iPad and aside from the sneers of derision from the 12-year-olds at airports :), I manage just fine.

        The reality is that we're now a laptop world. A few want desktops, and that's why the Pro exists, and I'm sure it will be updated, but it's hardly a leading seller for Apple.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by peragrin (659227)

        Not to defend Apple. but every other manufacturer of tablets, laptops, computers, cell phones release dozens of models every year.

        Apple generally limits themselves to just one new design/ upgrade annually and you pounce on them for doing two?

        At least apple supports their hardware for more than 12 months. If that was a dell model not only couldn't you get service or parts, but you would have to buy another one as it would be cheaper than replacing the power supply.

        It is the one thing wrong with Android devi

        • by Gonoff (88518)

          At least apple supports their hardware for more than 12 months....
          If that was a dell model not only couldn't you get service or parts, but you would have to buy another one as it would be cheaper than replacing the power supply.

          We get 3 year warranties for all our new Dells. When they get towards the end of this time, and afterwards, the PSUs often fail because of our dodgy mains. If they are inside that 3 years, dell relpaces them. No problem.

          We just bought a load of replacement power supplies got our out of warranty GX760s Much cheaper than replaceing them and it takes less than 10 minutes to do it.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by macs4all (973270)

        Yeah, so instead of telling their customer :" Hold on, we'll deliver a brand new one", they go for "Rush for the shops, we won't comply the EU directives and there'll be no more of those Mac Pro in store in a couple of weeks". Yeah thank you Apple...

        It's not as if they would release 2 ipad versions in one year, completely killing the brand new tablet you bought 6 month earlier...

        Perhaps they know they can't get the new Mac Pro ready in a reasonable time after this bullshit "directive" goes into effect, or (MUCH more likely), the EU rules threw their development cycle into a tizzy, and now they have to REDESIGN their almost-ready-but-now-not-so-much Mac Pro. Ever think of that???

        BTW, I wonder how the average EU CITIZEN thinks of all this? Fascinating that I'm not seeing the typical Slashdot posturing and whining against government overreach; just people bitching at Apple for doing

        • by tibit (1762298) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @11:13AM (#42771311)

          You're crazy. This is nothing new, the industry has been aware of those changes for some years now! Who the heck do you think writes those standards? If Apple doesn't have a company person, or better, many people, in ANSI or IEC, they're being stupid. I don't know who the heck spun this non-story as if Apple was up to the wall, or this was a new regulation, or whatever. Nobody who knows how those standards come into being is surprised at all. Many big corporations join standards bodies and have their say and are always aware of what's going on. I'm pretty damn sure Apple must have their people in standards bodies. They can certainly afford it. Note: standards are written by volunteers. A company buys sufficiently large membership, and they get to have their people doing the work. That's how it has been since beginning of time, really.

          • by Nerdfest (867930)

            I'm surprised nobody has made any 'Dysan' style bladeless computer fans. Probably higher power, but close to silent. Based on Apple's slimy patenting of magnetic power cord attachment (which had been used in other places for many years), it's probably patentable.

            • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

              by drinkypoo (153816)

              Why would they be silent? Nothing else Dyson makes is.

              We already have quiet fans with high-tech blades and fluid or maglev bearings, and we also have liquid cooling. So we already have quiet to silent cooling. There's also the option to have devices which consume so little power that they can run without active cooling.

            • by macs4all (973270) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @11:35AM (#42771465)

              I'm surprised nobody has made any 'Dysan' style bladeless computer fans. Probably higher power, but close to silent. Based on Apple's slimy patenting of magnetic power cord attachment (which had been used in other places for many years), it's probably patentable.

              Dysan fans aren't "bladeless". They conceal the impeller in the base, then "magically" distribute that airflow around a ring. Very cool looking the first time you see it; but once you know what's going on, not so much.

        • by AmiMoJo (196126) * <{ten.3dlrow} {ta} {ojom}> on Saturday February 02, 2013 @11:28AM (#42771413) Homepage

          I am an average EU citizen and think this directive is a good thing. It applies to all sorts of appliances that have fans capable of damaging internal wiring or causing injury. Guards cost pennies and every other manufacturer managed to comply in good time.

        • by Gonoff (88518) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @12:06PM (#42771713)

          BTW, I wonder how the average EU CITIZEN thinks of all this?

          Sounds like they are doing what they are supposed to do. One of the jobs of a government is to protect the people from those richer and more powerful.
          You don't get much richer and more powerful than Apple.

        • by Trepidity (597) <delirium-slashdot@@@hackish...org> on Saturday February 02, 2013 @12:38PM (#42771935)

          BTW, I wonder how the average EU CITIZEN thinks of all this? Fascinating that I'm not seeing the typical Slashdot posturing and whining against government overreach

          One thing that makes me better disposed to this case is that it wasn't a regulation pulled out of thin air by random government bureaucrats, but rather one drawn up by electrical engineers, from an independent standards body not controlled by the EU, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The US even has substantial representation on the body, so it's not just European engineers drawing it up. The EU just chose to implement their recommendation as mandatory, whereas in some other countries IEC recommendations may be treated as only advisory.

        • by Kat M. (2602097) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @02:39PM (#42772763)

          BTW, I wonder how the average EU CITIZEN thinks of all this? Fascinating that I'm not seeing the typical Slashdot posturing and whining against government overreach; just people bitching at Apple for doing the only thing they can on short notice.

          It's an IEC standard, not something that the EU thought up. The same standard will presumably come to the United States and Canada in a year or two. Note that this also affects several non-EU countries (Switzerland and Norway in particular).

          Also, it hasn't been "short notice". The amendment was published in December 2009, over three years ago.

      • by mjwalshe (1680392)
        yes not exactly inspiring confidence in the mac proline is it
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Runaway1956 (1322357)

        "It's not as if they would release 2 ipad versions in one year, completely killing the brand new tablet you bought 6 month earlier..."

        The second version could do what, exactly, that the first version could not do? That statement stinks of "status symbol". I can't imagine that one version of iPad makes another so very obsolete, that you can't use it any longer. The only reason to buy the newer one, that I can see, is being able to flash it to people at the bar, at work, on the bus or train - even in the g

        • by the_B0fh (208483)

          Man, you don't 'know how often he gets laid using his brand new iPad!!

          But now, his iPad is so last generation, and all the babes ignore him.

          And with the new 128G iPads coming out, he can't even flash his 64GB iPad and impress them with his size any more!!!

          Have some pity man.

        • It's not as if they would release 2 ipad versions in one year, completely killing the brand new tablet you bought 6 month earlier...

          The second version could do what, exactly, that the first version could not do?

          While I agree that "completely killing" is a gross overstatement and I also agree with your sentiment in general that most users would not notice a difference between the 3rd and 4th gen iPads, I would not rule out the possibility that for some there is a noticeable difference.

          From 2nd to 3rd gen iPads the GPU goes from dual to quad core, memory from 512 MB to 1024 MB, and the screen resolution doubles (retina display, 4x pixels).
          From 3rd to 4th gen iPads the CPU goes from 1.0 GHz to 1.4 and the GPU fro

      • maybe new name and pricing levels or BIG changes. Or maybe just to clear stock so no one get's a older system after that date.

      • by Karlt1 (231423)

        "It's not as if they would release 2 ipad versions in one year, completely killing the brand new tablet you bought 6 month earlier..."

        So your tablet stopped working the day that Apple announced a new one?

    • by wisty (1335733)

      Or the Mac Pro is about to go EOL, so there's no point changing it.

      • by macs4all (973270)

        Or the Mac Pro is about to go EOL, so there's no point changing it.

        Or perhaps you're full of shit.

        • Full of shit? The current Mac Pro is indeed pretty much EOL.

          It hasn't been updated for years (except perhaps a new graphics card or two), so it's still using Nehalem processors. Pretty much everyone else is using Sandy Bridge E and up by now.

    • Apple does not plan to modify their machines and will simply pull them from market in the EU.

      In all likelihood it's because they've got a new Mac Pro model ready to launch. The Mac Pro hasn't had a significant update in years, it's the only Mac that doesn't have a Thunderbolt port, for example.

      A new Mac Pro is being released in 2013 [forbes.com], confirmed by Apple.

      While a new MP may be coming - all the referenced articles said were - MP customers are important, great things are coming to the desktop in 2013, we are working on MP designs which probably will be coming in 2013. Hardly a solid statement on the MP future.

      • by the_B0fh (208483)

        Apple: New Mac Pro that will amaze you in 2013.
        iHaters: Hardly a solid statement on the MP future.

        • Apple: New Mac Pro that will amaze you in 2013. iHaters: Hardly a solid statement on the MP future.

          Fair enough - were did Apple definitely state that - rather than it being the conclusion from a series of non-definitive statements? Personally, I'd love to see a new MP but am not holding my breath.

    • So they use the EU as an excuse to replce product? Stupidest theory I've ever read.
    • by erroneus (253617)

      What evidence gives you the impression that the 2013 line (which the comments in the article you linked to point out has been a sign of betrayal by negligence) will comply with EU standards?

  • by mariox19 (632969) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:41AM (#42770893)

    Thank goodness Europe will be safe now from those assault Macs.

  • by erroneus (253617) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:41AM (#42770895) Homepage

    They have no interest in keeping their legacy gear up to date or up to code. Their primary investments are:

    1. Lawyers
    2. iPhone/iPad/iPod

    Their OSX currently reflects this direction.

    I for one and sad to see Apple giving up this part of their product line. It is the only part I really like.

    The sad reality is that Apple only cares about what Apple cares about. Not about what its consumers want and Apple (Steve Jobs) has stated it plainly. It is not for the people to tell Apple what they want, but rather for Apple to tell people what they want. And by extension, it is not for "the people" to tell Apple anything at all. They would rather exit a market they cannot control and dominate.

    And so, as things progress, they will continue to lose control over the iDevice market and the end is inevitable.

    • by the_B0fh (208483)

      You also seemed to have forgotten the part where Steve Jobs said - if the customers like what we do, great, they will buy it. If they don't like what we do, then they won't buy it, and we will change it.

      Funny how dropping complete lines of words changes the entire context.

  • SRSLY? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by cellocgw (617879) <cellocgwNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:50AM (#42770921) Journal

    So if I understand the reg. in question, hardware with an internal fan (like a Mac Pro) that is only accessible if you pull the housing must have an internal fan guard? WTF?
    This makes no sense. For that matter that thing about minimum and max cord length is pretty wacked. Is there really a computer, or transistor radio, manufacturer out there who wanted to deliver 7-meter power cords?

    • Re:SRSLY? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by moronoxyd (1000371) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:59AM (#42770969)

      So if I understand the reg. in question, hardware with an internal fan (like a Mac Pro) that is only accessible if you pull the housing must have an internal fan guard? WTF?

      The Mac Pro has a power supply. The power supply has a fan. This fan is close to the outer housing of the Mac Pro and accessible through some gills of some sort ... Do you now see where the potential risk lies?

      • Re:SRSLY? (Score:4, Informative)

        by macs4all (973270) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @10:53AM (#42771195)

        So if I understand the reg. in question, hardware with an internal fan (like a Mac Pro) that is only accessible if you pull the housing must have an internal fan guard? WTF?

        The Mac Pro has a power supply. The power supply has a fan. This fan is close to the outer housing of the Mac Pro and accessible through some gills of some sort ... Do you now see where the potential risk lies?

        Please show me ANY picture of a Mac Pro where an EXPOSED-TO-THE-OUTSIDE fan is shown. The Mac Pro has PLENTY of fans (ask anyone who has made one really work hard!), BUT NONE OF THEM ARE ACCESSIBLE OR EVEN VISIBLE (except through perforated metal GUARDS) WITHOUT OPENING THE CASE!!!

        Got it?

        Here's a handy DIY document from Apple [apple.com], that shows ALL of the fan locations. Please tell me how these aren't "guarded" already.

        Your move.

    • by aaarrrgggh (9205)

      Power cord lengths are regulated in the US as well-- forget if it is 2m or 6ft. You can only use 15ft cords in "information technology equipment rooms." Of course in the US it is regulated by UL/NFPA, and not a government agency.

      • It's not 'regulation' in the sense it's a law. It's a requirement from the people that issue liability insurance.

        UL is run by a consortium of insurance companies.

        It's one of those things that shows that private enterprise isn't necessarily better.

    • by nten (709128)

      Apple didn't pay their dues, considering the way the samsung case went in the UK they probably don't lobby/bribe anywhere in europe. Not that I think the case had merit, just that if they had paid they would have won. No one has ever been maimed by a 5.5v fan have they? Whatever manufacturer did pay, looked at the differences between their product and apple's, and found the difference between the two that was easiest to use, then lobbied/bribed the regulators to regulate that difference in their favor.

  • Build your own (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 02, 2013 @09:50AM (#42770923)

    http://www.tonymacx86.com/325-building-customac-buyer-s-guide-january-2013.html

  • Hmm (Score:5, Informative)

    by _Shad0w_ (127912) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @10:00AM (#42770981)

    I'm going to assume the EU actually stipulates that particular IEC standard must be followed in law then, because the IEC isn't an EU body, it's an international one. In fact ANSI is a full member of the IEC.

  • by Rambo Tribble (1273454) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @10:04AM (#42770993)
    "We don't need you, you need us."
    • by whisper_jeff (680366) on Saturday February 02, 2013 @11:15AM (#42771333)

      Or, as they've already announced, they plan on launching a new Mac Pro this year and see no reason to modify the existing design to meet new standards for a couple of months when their new machines, which are coming soon, probably meet those standards.

      Or you can pretend that it's some elitist attitude thing because that sounds cool, right.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        So, just don't hold the Mac Pro that way?
      • by jsepeta (412566)
        No, what Tim Cook said was, "Although we didn’t have a chance to talk about a new Mac Pro at today’s event, don’t worry as we’re working on something really great for later next year." -- that's not saying Apple will release a new Mac Pro; they're working on something different that they think pros will like (or put up with, like Final Cut Pro X).
  • Yeah, so? (Score:4, Informative)

    by phillymjs (234426) <slashdot@nospAM.stango.org> on Saturday February 02, 2013 @10:27AM (#42771087) Homepage Journal

    IIRC, Tim Cook already publicly stated a redesigned Mac Pro would be released in 2013.

    The other Macs in the lineup have grown more powerful over the years, so the number of people who still specifically need the abilities of a Mac Pro is relatively small. It would make no financial sense for Apple to address these regulations by changing the current Mac Pro design. The best move was what they did-- simply giving those people some warning so anyone who was planning future Mac Pro purchases could decide if they needed to buy the existing model or could afford to wait for the redesigned model to be announced.

  • if the current generation had good enough sales in Europe Apple would make a fix and keep selling.

    But since they haven't made any real updates to the Mac Pro in /years/ (the CPU is a few generations behind, still based on the first-gen Core i7 Xeons) their sales just aren't good.

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