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Chinese Supplier Gets Dumped By Apple For Fraudulently Using Underage Labor 206

Posted by timothy
from the didn't-ask-for-her-license dept.
jones_supa writes "Another report from Apple regarding Chinese labor practices surfaces. After conducting its 2011 audits to 339 sites, the company found that cases of underage labor had jumped from 6 to 74 in one year. It was concentrated in a single circuit board manufacturer, which Apple says was willfully conspiring with families to forge age-verification documents. According to a new report, Apple didn't find any cases of underage workers at its final assembly suppliers in 2012, but it plans to continue going deeper into the supply chain to ferret out violators. We are talking about Guangdong Real Faith Pingzhou Electronics Co., with which Apple has now terminated its relationship."
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Chinese Supplier Gets Dumped By Apple For Fraudulently Using Underage Labor

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  • That's got to be a mistranslation.

  • what's "underage" (Score:3, Insightful)

    by rubycodez (864176) on Sunday January 27, 2013 @04:40PM (#42709587)

    how old were they, if poor teenagers want to help their families by earning some extra coin, better that than being punks in a street gang

    • by gl4ss (559668)

      well, probably old enough that forging the papers is an option.

      but there's the kicker.. they're kids, not detached drone workers of the family.

    • the employment of children in any work that deprives children of their childhood, interferes with their ability to attend regular school, and that is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful.

      From Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] citing The International Labour Organization [ilo.org].

      So we're not talking about teenagers sweeping the floor in a factory after school.

  • by Inigo Montoya (31674) on Sunday January 27, 2013 @04:52PM (#42709665) Journal

    Did anyone who's already posted even read the article? Apparently, the children are placed back at home and their education is completely financed by the violator. Apple follows-up regularly to make sure they are complying.

    The child probably went to work in the first place because the family could not afford an education, so they had to choose between sending the child to school or putting food on the table. So now they can put the child back in school, and someone else in the family can work to put food on the table, and not have to worry about paying for an education for the child anymore.

    • by Nyder (754090)

      Did anyone who's already posted even read the article? ...

      In case you haven't logged on Slashdot in the last decade, we don't read the articles before posting anymore.

    • by ernest.cunningham (972490) on Sunday January 27, 2013 @05:04PM (#42709755) Homepage

      If you read the article further yourself, not only does the company have to pay for their education, but also pay the child the same wage it was earning!

      To quote the article:
      When new violations are found, Apple requires its suppliers to return the workers back to a school chosen by the family and finance their education. "In addition, the children must continue to receive income matching what they received when they were employed. We also follow up regularly to ensure that the children remain in school and that the suppliers continue to uphold their financial commitment," wrote Apple in its latest report.

      I don't think anybody who has posted read the article at all.

      • by gl4ss (559668)

        though now they terminated with that company so what does the company care?

    • by Shavano (2541114)
      In China, isn't education free (government provided) and compulsory? Or did that end with Communism?
      • by areusche (1297613)
        China is only communist in name, but not in practice. A lot of schools have "fees" associated with attending and the cost of which is generally not affordable for many people. A lot of children do not complete the compulsory 9 years of schooling. Take a look here, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Education_in_the_People's_Republic_of_China#Compulsory_education_law [wikipedia.org]
        • by KiloByte (825081)

          Having lived in communist Poland, I can tell you that this is what communism is about. The works of Marks and Lenin were pure lies even according to their authors. And since every single implementation of communism in history resembled the Animal Farm, you can't say they weren't "true communism". The whole design is wrong, not merely "good but broken by corrupt leaders".

          Communism has only one real purpose: to give every layer of the Party power according to which layer you belong to. For example, the ve

          • by KiloByte (825081)

            The whole design is wrong, not merely "good but broken by corrupt leaders".

            s/wrong/working as intended by their authors rather than victims/

          • by Ash Vince (602485) *

            The works of Marks and Lenin were pure lies even according to their authors.

            If you ever bothered to read them you might know his name was spelt "Marx" not "Marks".

            I actually think he has some very good points about labour, especially when taken in the context of the time he wrote in. Of course this is very different from saying any real world example of communism is a good system, since almost all examples of communist countries came about long after he was pushing up daisies.

            I guess Marx is like anyone trying to do any sort of social commentary about systems they themselves are pa

            • by KiloByte (825081)

              If you ever bothered to read them you might know his name was spelt "Marx" not "Marks".

              ... or grew in a country that spells it "Marks" [wikipedia.org] (surprising as we use the Latin alphabet just like the original, but that's probably because most communists who invaded us spoke russian [wikipedia.org] natively).

              • by Ash Vince (602485) *

                If you ever bothered to read them you might know his name was spelt "Marx" not "Marks".

                ... or grew in a country that spells it "Marks" [wikipedia.org] (surprising as we use the Latin alphabet just like the original, but that's probably because most communists who invaded us spoke russian [wikipedia.org] natively).

                Wow, wierd. In my country we pretty much always spell peoples names the way they were actually spelt be the person we are referring to and try and guess the pronunciation correctly based on country of origin so in my case I would try and pronounce his name in a slight german accent :)

                I guess it is because we have so many foreign words and place names in our vocabulary already, the same thing that makes English such a sod to learn I believe.

                Of course none of this changes my central point: That his writings a

                • by KiloByte (825081)

                  The concept of intellectual property (ie: copyright) is a cornerstone of capitalism

                  Hell no! The cornerstone of capitalism is free market. So-called "intellectual property" is state-enforced monopoly, something that's an anathema to free market, about as antithetical to it as bailouts. It deprives people of freedom to use their own actual property, just because someone obtained monopoly rights.

                  And even actual property is not that important for free market, all that matters is that no one can deprive you of what you have. Copyright and patents destroy the right to create things while no

  • subcontracted work out this is the issue as well the main supplier / contractors should get fined as well.

    In usa cable co's do this some times it ends up very bad.

    http://consumerist.com/2011/10/05/couple-sues-cox-after-cable-guy-kills-their-son/ [consumerist.com]

  • And that "Jump" was from an audit of the second year Apple did the study, 2011. For 2012, "According to Apple's new report, the company didn't find any cases of underage workers at its final assembly suppliers in 2012". Of the subcontractors audited, only one was a serious violator, and that company was terminated as a supplier to Apple. My conclusion is that all of this Slashdot hyperbole and handwringing over Chinese supply chain is kinda 2003. 74 cases out of tens of thousands, concentrated at one s
    • And that "Jump" was from an audit of the second year Apple did the study, 2011.

      Actually, they've been doing the report annually since 2007.

  • by ilsaloving (1534307) on Sunday January 27, 2013 @06:56PM (#42710635)

    Apple gets a lot of flak for 'letting it happen', but Apple is the only company I know of that is actively trying to do something about it.

    If this is happening to Apple, you KNOW it's happening to everyone else. And I have yet to hear a single report of Samsung doing a similar thing to what Apple is doing now.

    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      If this is happening to Apple, you KNOW it's happening to everyone else. And I have yet to hear a single report of Samsung doing a similar thing to what Apple is doing now.

      Samsung is also under fire for this [engadget.com], but because they use Android and make some of the best Androids, they're the darling of the tech world, so it was mostly buried.

      Thoug, to be fair, Samsung looks to be starting to also audit their supply chain [engadget.com] to prevent an Apple-like thing from happening to them. Then again, Samsung does have the benef

  • I think an outright ban on child labor (at least in the US) has led to several generations of people with a huge sense of personal entitlement and no work ethic. They spend the first 16-18 years of their life having all their wants and needs just handed to them on a silver platter without having to expend any effort to get those things, then they turn 18 and don't know how to deal with the real world.

    One example of this entitlement effect is people who start a business, run it for only 8-10 years before hir

    • by unixisc (2429386)
      In this story, the subject is kids working in factories under conditions that most would consider exploitative. I agree that they don't belong there, but given how much work has diversified, it's time to reconsider what sort of labor would be okay, vs what sort should remain banned. Yeah, factories are out of the question, but given how a lot of jobs nowadays are desk jobs at computers, and that too sometimes virtual, it seems that kids, who anyway spend hours in front of TVs or computers, could use some
  • I started working at around the age of 10, but no one was forcing me. I had saved up several thousand dollars by the age of 13. I could work as much or as little as I wanted, and I was able to keep the money. As long as the child has the freedom to refuse and is allowed to keep the money for themselves (if they want) I actually think forbidding child labor is what is wrong. Like adults, children tend to be happier when allowed to do what they want to do. If they want to do some useful work to buy themselves

  • Is it the current overcapacity in production that warrants a better look at the labor done for Apple? As the demand is lower, it sounds like a perfect excuse to ditch a factory, which otherwise would have been unreasonable.
  • Plenty of high school students drop out to earn money due to family encouragement. Staying in school is viewed as unproductive.
  • The most likely occasion is that this just repeats with a nominally different supplier. Just cut to the chase and cut out the areas that pull this stuff.

    Sounds like FDR knew of this kind of threat well before business even thought of it as an opportunity:

    We have come to a clear realization of the fact that true individual freedom cannot exist without economic security and independence. “Necessitous men are not free men.” People who are hungry and out of a job are the stuff of which dictatorships are made.

    China not only has hundreds of millions of such necessitous men, they also have women and children of that variety as well. That, and they have the dictatorship as far as the workers are concerned - where critics disappear or get smeared (in the case of A

It seems that more and more mathematicians are using a new, high level language named "research student".

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