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iOS 6 Adoption Rates Soar Following Google Maps Release 143

Posted by samzenpus
from the incentive-directions dept.
redletterdave writes "The Dec. 12 reinstatement of Google Maps on iOS has apparently been enough for some of those reluctant users to finally make the upgrade to iOS 6. According to MoPub, the San Francisco-based mobile ad exchange that monitors more than 1 billion ad impressions a day and supports more than a dozen ad networks and 12,000 apps, there has been a 29 percent increase in unique iOS 6 users in the past five days following Google Maps' release on iOS. In fact, MoPub reports a 13 percent increase in iOS 6 users from last Monday to Wednesday alone, which would mean that nearly half of the converts to iOS 6 in the past week switched the very moment Google Maps' standalone app hit the App Store."
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iOS 6 Adoption Rates Soar Following Google Maps Release

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  • Great! (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 20, 2012 @10:29PM (#42355465)

    Now how about getting the version for iPads too?

    • by omnichad (1198475)

      You can still use the iPhone version on your iPad while they rework the UI for the iPad version. I'm sure they didn't want to burden their rushed development by doing two UI's at the same time.

  • China (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 20, 2012 @10:30PM (#42355483)

    Does this take into account the fact that the iPhone was released in China last weekend and may have caused a spike?

    • Re:China (Score:5, Informative)

      by adamstew (909658) on Thursday December 20, 2012 @10:50PM (#42355627)

      This article from an iOS advertising platform company pretty much confirms that: http://insights.chitika.com/2012/ios-6-adoption-post-google-maps/ [chitika.com]

      Basically, when google maps was released for iOS 6, their data shows that it had no immediate impact on iOS 6 adoption and continued to have no impact for 5 days afterwards. Once the iPhone 5 was released in China, then there was a nice little spike in iOS 6 usage.

      Basically, if you look at it week-by-week, it could look like Google Maps caused a spike in iOS 6 adoption, but when you look at it day-by-day it tells a different story.

      • by andydread (758754)
        Holy frigging truth Batman.....you busted their BS wide open.
      • Perhaps people waited.

        Take me, for example. I downloaded the new Google Maps when it came out on December 14th. But it's not like I immediately upgraded to iOS 6. I did that this past Monday, December 17th.

        Hell, I'm not going to risk upgrading until I actually make sure things are going to work. I know, call me crazy...

        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Pieroxy (222434)

          I upgraded eons ago and never regretted it. Apple Maps is actually not as bad as people made it to be, and Google Maps was always available through Safari anyways. This is all just FUD and people being afraid of something nonexistent.

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by AlecC (512609)

            I would guess you are in the US, where it isn't that bad. Near me, in the well populated southern UK, it has lost one and displaced one of the significant towns in my immediate area - places I frequently visit. The latter is the place I nominally live - where I pay my local taxes. Obviously, because I know my own patch pretty well, I don't need to map these places. But it means my confidence in it mapping a place I don't know is essentially zero,

            • by Pieroxy (222434)

              I would guess you are in the US

              And you would be wrong.

              There were some glaring mistakes, but they were all fixed pretty quickly - in a matter of days or weeks. Tell me this: are your neighborhood towns still misplaced on Apple Maps? If not, do you have an idea when it was fixed?

              • Re:China (Score:4, Informative)

                by AlecC (512609) <aleccawley@gmail.com> on Friday December 21, 2012 @12:32PM (#42360575)

                Yes, Marlborough still gone, replaced by Ogbourn St Andrew, a tiny village nearby, and Basingstoke has moved six miles west to the approximate location of Watership Down.Searching for Crawley takes you to the hamlet in Hampshire not the major town by Gatwick Airport, and searching for Crawley, Sussex finds some sort of health club in Burgess Hill, twenty miles away. They did manage quite quickly to remove Burghclere Station, closed in 1960 and now buried under the Newbury Bypass (after putting it very conveniently close to my home, instead of two miles, where it actually had been).

          • by omnichad (1198475)

            Even right in the middle of a major area like St. Louis, it did pretty poorly for me.

            But if you need more convincing, See this blog full of terrible screenshots [tumblr.com]!

    • by tverbeek (457094) on Thursday December 20, 2012 @11:01PM (#42355715) Homepage

      Post hoc ergo propter hoc strikes again.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      The Techcrunch retraction [techcrunch.com]:

      "[Update: One fact that may confound this data is that roughly 2 million iPhone 5s went online in China over the say timespan as the study analyzed, and they may have contributed to the increased iOS 6 traffic data. However, those phones aren't likely enough to account for the entire boost in iOS 6 traffic to MoPub-partnered apps.]"

  • No it didnt (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday December 20, 2012 @10:30PM (#42355485)

    Ummm no it didn't. It was because of the iPhone being released in China. Check Macrumors (where I saw the original and correction).

  • I do tend to wonder, if Google Maps is so pivotal to the widespread adoption of iOS 6, would we begin to see a lot of people moving toward Android phones if Google removed their maps from the iOS App Store? I know Google Maps (and its turn-by-turn navigation) was a very important feature when considering purchasing my own phone.
    • by erice (13380) on Thursday December 20, 2012 @10:41PM (#42355571) Homepage

      I do tend to wonder, if Google Maps is so pivotal to the widespread adoption of iOS 6, would we begin to see a lot of people moving toward Android phones if Google removed their maps from the iOS App Store?

      We might, but Google is under significant anti-trust scrutiny so I doubt they would actually try it. I also doubt that it would be in Google's interest. Google doesn't make much (if anything) off of Android. Its purpose is to funnel mobile users to Google services like Google Maps.

      • by rockout (1039072) on Thursday December 20, 2012 @10:52PM (#42355655)
        Also, many people in the US might be waiting for their contracts to expire before moving to an Android phone from the iPhone. I'm taking a wild guess and I'm obviously biased because I happen to be one of those people, but I can't be the only one. I'm also looking to switch providers and paying $350 to do so before my contract is up is unappetizing to me. So, maybe you'll see a more drawn-out move to Android in the next year or so. Who knows? I can only speak for myself, and that's what I'm doing - was considering it for a while and the Apple Maps fiasco was really the last straw.
        • by Anonymous Coward

          This. If I didn't still have 6 months left on my contract with Verizon on my iPhone 4, I'd have bought the Nexus 4 on day one. Google Maps was fully half that equation (public transit directions are absolutely critical for me on a smartphone); having grown accustomed to my Nexus 7 being the other. As it is, even with the standalone Google Maps app it'll be a tough call between buying the Nexus 4, staying with the iPhone 4, or buying the iPhone 5 come time my contract is up. So far the latter is seeming to b

          • by SuperKendall (25149) on Friday December 21, 2012 @12:01AM (#42356057)

            public transit directions are absolutely critical for me on a smartphone

            If you really feel that way, you will be far better served using iOS going forward.

            I have used Google Transit a LOT over the years. When you use it in multiple cities, or for a long time every day, you grow to realize that the data it's giving you is mediocre. Yes it generally works but it's often out of touch with the way buses are really running, and if you investigate where the data comes from it's all static files updated infrequently by the metro companies in each city.

            A third party app can cover cities much better, integrating more deeply into the existing metro data stream. There's already an app for iOS called simply Transit [tapone.ca] (careful, more than one exist) that seems to have the same coverage Google Transit does, and has better presentation of transit data than Google. You not only get a list of possible transit combinations with stops and walking, but it also adds extra details like "this one is slower but has less walking". When scrolling through the segments of the selected route Transit does a great job of showing the route on the map, giving you the estimated departure and arrival times for the bus picking you up and dropping you off.

            So already iOS users get better transit directions than Google Maps gives you, and the transit situation on iOS will only get better as time goes by. With Apple directing people to third party apps there is a TON of motivation to build a really good custom metro app for every city because customers will be herded right to your app outside the crowded app store.

            It's funny that so many people talk about how Apple should allow you to chose a browser or mail client (which would be useful) but then claim it's pointless or unnecessary to have a map where you can chose the best application to give you transit directions. Why should that area be immune from letting third parties do a better job, especially when it's just not possible to do the best job for every city across the globe?

            Especially combined with the trick of asking Siri "Take me to *LocationX* via transit" you have simple one-click transit routing to anywhere quickly and with the best transit directions you can get.

            • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

              by erice (13380)

              It's funny that so many people talk about how Apple should allow you to chose a browser or mail client (which would be useful) but then claim it's pointless or unnecessary to have a map where you can chose the best application to give you transit directions. Why should that area be immune from letting third parties do a better job, especially when it's just not possible to do the best job for every city across the globe?

              Unlike Apple, Google doesn't block third party apps that compete with its own services and there *are* third party mapping programs on Android.

              • Unlike Apple, Google doesn't block third party apps that compete with its own services

                Apple doesn't do that any more either. There are scores of map, mail and browser apps in the App Store.

                They may be limiting the number of fart apps, a great loss to the market I'm sure.

                there *are* third party mapping programs on Android.M

                And they will suck utterly compared to the third party transit apps on iOS, because they are lost in the middle of all the other applications. With Google providing you mediocre transit

                • by thegarbz (1787294) on Friday December 21, 2012 @04:44AM (#42357383)

                  They may be limiting the number of fart apps, a great loss to the market I'm sure.

                  When I can download another browser I'll agree with you. Until then this post screams of closing your eyes, sticking fingers in your ears and going "lalala"

                  • by jo_ham (604554)

                    They may be limiting the number of fart apps, a great loss to the market I'm sure.

                    When I can download another browser I'll agree with you. Until then this post screams of closing your eyes, sticking fingers in your ears and going "lalala"

                    There's a small software and search company called "Google" that has an alternative browser on the App Store. It's called Chrome. Maybe you've heard of it?

                    http://www.google.com/intl/en/chrome/browser/mobile/ios.html [google.com]

                    • Surely you realize that's just a wrapper around an iOS service? You are either disingenuously misinterpreting the GP to discredit their criticism, or really have no clue about the state of competing browsers on iOS (ie, there are none, only wrappers and bookmark/history syncing).
                    • by thegarbz (1787294)

                      Oh I've heard of Chrome. It just doesn't exist on iOS. All you get on iOS devices is a skin that looks like Chrome which uses iOS's built-in Webkit API.

                      This is not an alternative browser, just like putting a shiny little red green blue yellow start button on KDE and calling it Lindows did not make it a Windows platform instead of a Linux platform.

                      Actually this entire thread is a fun read. Either you're really in "lalala" mode or you completely and utterly missed the point I was trying to make and are refusi

                    • by dimeglio (456244)

                      So Google Chrome is not Google Chrome because it runs on iOS?

                    • by jo_ham (604554)

                      Surely you realize that's just a wrapper around an iOS service? You are either disingenuously misinterpreting the GP to discredit their criticism, or really have no clue about the state of competing browsers on iOS (ie, there are none, only wrappers and bookmark/history syncing).

                      It's an app built on the WebKit engine provided on iOS, yes, but that's not what the OP said.

                      He said:

                      When I can download another browser I'll agree with you.

                      So, would you agree that Safari and Chrome are two different browsers, even if they both use the same WebKit API?

                      Alternatively there are other browsers on iOS that offload the rendering to a remote server and don't use WebKit, but I figured "Chrome vs Safari" was an easy enough distinction to make given that the criterion was "a different browser [to Safari]".

                      I have to wonder how you can say there are "no co

                    • by samoanbiscuit (1273176) on Friday December 21, 2012 @08:45AM (#42358495)
                      No actually, Chrome on iOS uses a slower (and less powerful) version of the webkit engine than Safari does. More specifically, Chrome on iOS is blocked from using the Nitro javascript engine that Safari has access to, and is not allowed to use it's own javascript JIT compiler, due to Apple's guidelines. So no, Chrome on iOS is a shadow of it's form on other platforms. This basically means that Safari remains by design, and not by chance, the best and most performant browser on iOS.
                    • It's not the "real" Google Chrome because it's blocked from using it's own fork of WebKit, and cannot use a javascript JIT compiler (neither the builtin Nitro engine, nor any third party one).
                    • by jo_ham (604554)

                      No actually, Chrome on iOS uses a slower (and less powerful) version of the webkit engine than Safari does. More specifically, Chrome on iOS is blocked from using the Nitro javascript engine that Safari has access to, and is not allowed to use it's own javascript JIT compiler, due to Apple's guidelines. So no, Chrome on iOS is a shadow of it's form on other platforms. This basically means that Safari remains by design, and not by chance, the best and most performant browser on iOS.

                      So, what you;re saying is that it's a different browser? Thus fulfilling the OP's request for, quote:

                      When I can download another browser I'll agree with you.

                      I'm not seeing how there can simultaneously be no competition between browsers on iOS because "they're all the same" but also be... different.

                      Also, the speed difference between the JS engines was down to the way the security model and sandboxing was set up - the newer, faster engine (ie, the same one Safari uses) was put into the public API at a later time. The speed parity did not last long. The same issue

                    • You haters ought to get together and discuss what FUD you're going to spread. I pays to be consistent.

                      Stop playing semantic games and just admit that there are no real alternative browsers, only wrappers around Apple's version of webkit, or some Frankensteinian monstrosity that offloads processing to the server.. Anyway, I joined this conversation to make a point and now must leave it point made, whether or not the recipient of my words understood them.

                    • by jo_ham (604554)

                      You haters ought to get together and discuss what FUD you're going to spread. I pays to be consistent.

                      Stop playing semantic games and just admit that there are no real alternative browsers, only wrappers around Apple's version of webkit, or some Frankensteinian monstrosity that offloads processing to the server.. Anyway, I joined this conversation to make a point and now must leave it point made, whether or not the recipient of my words understood them.

                      Haha. So arguments that you disagree with are "semantic games".

                      Ok, kid.

                      Now we're talking about no "real" alternatives, whereas before it was "there are NO alternatives".

                      *aims for the goal*

                      *goalposts move*

                      *oops!*

                      Intellectual dishonesty at its finest; move the goalposts after the fact and then declare my argument invalid based on the new criteria. You can do better.

                    • admit that there are no real alternative browsers

                      In order to do that I would have to believe that every website needed a fast Javascript engine.

                      Since they don't, you should really stop digging.

                      I use alternate browsers for a variety of things. It's absurd to claim there are none, since a huge part of the reason to use something like Chrome is you prefer the controls, bookmarking or how multiple browser windows work.

                    • by mcgrew (92797) *

                      Now we're talking about no "real" alternatives, whereas before it was "there are NO alternatives".

                      If there are no real alternatives, there are no alternatives. The fact is there is no Opera browser on an iPhone, only an Opera wrapper around Safari. If you're still running Safari, you're hardly using an alternative.

                      No goalposts were moved, you're simply splitting hairs and being disingenuous. How much Apple stock do you own, fellow? None? Then you're as much a fool for defending them than the ones defending

                    • by thegarbz (1787294)

                      So, what you;re saying is that it's a different browser? Thus fulfilling the OP's request for, quote:

                      Put lipstick on a pig and it's still a pig. Why do you persist in this stupidity when it's clear you didn't interpret what I said the way I meant it (most probably because you don't have a clue as to the arcane restrictions Apple places on apps).

                      You can't download any Gecko, or Presto engine browsers. You can't download any Webkit engine browsers that differ in Webkit from the Safari versions (Chrome webkit != Safari webkit).

                      All I get is a skin from another browser that inherits Safari's rendering bugs.

                    • by jo_ham (604554)

                      So, what you;re saying is that it's a different browser? Thus fulfilling the OP's request for, quote:

                      Put lipstick on a pig and it's still a pig. Why do you persist in this stupidity when it's clear you didn't interpret what I said the way I meant it (most probably because you don't have a clue as to the arcane restrictions Apple places on apps).

                      You can't download any Gecko, or Presto engine browsers. You can't download any Webkit engine browsers that differ in Webkit from the Safari versions (Chrome webkit != Safari webkit).

                      All I get is a skin from another browser that inherits Safari's rendering bugs.

                      No, you didn't "mean it" honestly. You are attempting to make the argument that two different browsers are the same browser because they share a common rendering engine. I am calling that argument what it is: nonsense.

                      The only reason you're sticking to this ludicrous argument is because an apple hater troll made the argument that there were no competing browsers on iOS (clearly having not done any research on the topic), and you're now desperately twisting in the wind trying to manufacture evidence and rede

                    • by jo_ham (604554)

                      Oh I've heard of Chrome. It just doesn't exist on iOS. All you get on iOS devices is a skin that looks like Chrome which uses iOS's built-in Webkit API.

                      This is not an alternative browser, just like putting a shiny little red green blue yellow start button on KDE and calling it Lindows did not make it a Windows platform instead of a Linux platform.

                      Actually this entire thread is a fun read. Either you're really in "lalala" mode or you completely and utterly missed the point I was trying to make and are refusing to let yourself be corrected. Either way it's an entertaining way to start the first day after the end of the world.

                      No, I didn't miss your point. Your point is intellectually dishonest.

                      Chrome and Safari on iOS are two different browsers. That is the argument. The share a common rendering engine. This doesn't matter. Fedora and Ubuntu share the same kernel. Does that make them the same product?

                    • Using the term 'hater' to describe an opponent in an argument is a cultish practice.

                      It's almost always Apple zealots who use the term.

                      Yeah. Asserting the above makes me a hater. Scientologists use this kind of semantics to keep themselves safely separate from 'the rest of us' too.

                    • by jo_ham (604554)

                      You're in lala land. But, whatever. It's probably kinda fun.

                      Is that what we're calling reality now?

                      I'd be interested in your response to the question: are Ubuntu and Fedora the same product?

              • by Anonymous Coward

                First look at how many map and map related titles there are for iOS and then tell me again how they're being blocked. There are almost too many to choose from. The selection is quite granular.

        • I moved from a droid to an iphone 5. To each their own.

          Aside from myself I don't know anyone switching, or wanting to switch, platforms.

        • Also, many people in the US might be waiting for their contracts to expire before moving to an Android phone from the iPhone.

          Perhaps. But there's this: http://www.kantarworldpanel.com/Global/News/Soaring-iPhone-5-sales-in-US-knock-Android-into-second-place [kantarworldpanel.com]

      • by thegarbz (1787294)

        We might, but Google is under significant anti-trust scrutiny so I doubt they would actually try it.

        While I agree it's unlikely I guarantee you that anti-trust would not make one iota of a difference here. There's absolutely nothing in any antitrust law that says you need to support your competitors product with your app. Actually it's quite the opposite. The fact that maps is so wide spread that it is the app of choice on a competitors platform is unlikely to be doing them favours.

      • You're right, Google doesn't make much off Android. They made about $540 million in revenue off of it from 2006-2011. Apple makes that in PROFIT from the iPhone in 1 week. Additionally, Google makes about $2 on advertising from each Android user while they make just over $6 from each iPhone user.
    • by SuperKendall (25149) on Thursday December 20, 2012 @11:44PM (#42355975)

      Would we begin to see a lot of people moving toward Android phones if Google removed their maps from the iOS App Store?

      The funny thing is that at the highest levels, Google and Apple really do not care about each other the way the fans at the lowest level seem to.

      Google just wants to make great data driven apps that in turn drive a lot of data their way. If Android falters they will shrug and simply keep producing apps for the leading platforms. Obviously they would prefer Android to keep doing well because they collect more data that way.

      Apple just wants to make and sell hardware as well made as they can, continuing down the road of integrating software and hardware to the greatest degree possible. They are happy to have well executed applications run on iOS; after all, it moves more hardware. It was pretty funny to watch people speculate on Slashdot that Google Maps would be blocked from the App Store when there were so many other mapping apps on the store already, and obviously Apple wants good applications because they help sell iOS devices.

      So Google would not pull Google Maps from the App Store because it helps them, and Apple will not block it because it helps them.

      But even if for some reason Google went nuts I don't think it would affect iOS much, there are too many other high quality mapping solutions already (including Apple's own maps).

      • by zuperduperman (1206922) on Friday December 21, 2012 @02:51AM (#42356959)

        Google and Apple really do not care about each other the way the fans at the lowest level seem to.

        Ah, so when Steve Jobs said "I'm going to destroy Android! I'm going thermonuclear on them, I will spend every last cent of Apple's $40b in the bank to destroy Android!", he actually meant something more like:

        "Ah, jolly good chaps those Google folk, helping us sell our devices by making fantastic apps!"

        I'm glad we have you to clarify that. Then again, I'm not quite sure your theory maps completely onto reality.

        • Ah, so when Steve Jobs said "I'm going to destroy Android! I'm going thermonuclear on them, I will spend every last cent of Apple's $40b in the bank to destroy Android!", he actually meant something more like

          I was not aware Zombie Steve Jobs was running the company.

          His reality sure warped you!

  • It's from China (Score:5, Informative)

    by mdaitc (619734) on Thursday December 20, 2012 @10:43PM (#42355577)
    http://www.macrumors.com/2012/12/20/ios-6-adoption-uptick-due-to-iphone-5-release-in-china-not-google-maps/ [macrumors.com] Ad network and analytics firm Chitika claims it has seen no significant increase in iOS 6 adoption in the U.S. and Canada. A company analyst believes the MoPub data (which was international, rather than domestic) we wrote about earlier today was affected by the recent launch of the iPhone 5 in China, rather than the release of Google Maps. This past weekend, Apple issued a press release bragging that it had sold more than two million iPhone 5 units in China over the first three days of availability.
  • have the self-respect to pull this piece of bullshit from their front page, or will they just roll on to the next?

    • also note to editors:
      reticent =/= reluctant
      "reticent" $\notequal$ "reluctant"
      reticent is NOT equal to and does not mean reluctant
      .
      • by Maxx169 (920414)
        Common usage as opposed to etymology dictates meaning... Which is a shame really. Give it a couple of decades and even dictionaries will resign themselves to the fact that reticent does indeed mean reluctant. This will leave us with taciturn; a poor substitute.
    • by Pieroxy (222434)

      have the self-respect to pull this piece of bullshit from their front page, or will they just roll on to the next?

      Option 2 captain.

  • reticent =/= reluctant
    "reticent" $\notequal$ "reluctant"
    reticent â reluctant
    .
    How many ways can I type that "not-equal sign"? (not in unicode, obvviously damn it) Seriously, to paraphrase Inigo Montoya [wikipedia.org], that word in this article summary does NOT mean what they think it means.
    Reticent [wiktionary.org] can mean modest or keeping something to oneself, or keeping quiet about something.
    Reluctant [wiktionary.org] can mean not willing or inclined to do something, which is the meaning that must have been intended.
    .
    Seriously, do th
    • by isorox (205688)

      reticent =/= reluctant

      "reticent" $\notequal$ "reluctant"

      reticent â reluctant
      .

      How many ways can I type that "not-equal sign"?

      Normal people would write <> or !=

      • re:Normal people would write "\gr \lt" or "!="
        I don't think that less-than-or-greater-than would apply because the use of "lessthan" or "greaterthan" implies the presence of a partial ordering, and though words are ordered alphabetically, I am talking about inequality. "a \lt \gt b" (sort of) implies "a \lt b" or "b \lt a", which also implies some ordering. You are, however, correct that "!=" would also work and be correctly interpreted. The fact that I could not get the unicode "not-equal sign" to b
        • I don't think that less-than-or-greater-than would apply because the use of "lessthan" or "greaterthan" implies the presence of a partial ordering, and though words are ordered alphabetically, I am talking about inequality.

          Most people around here know a bit of coding, and in (among others) BASIC, Pascal and SQL the <> operator means not-equal-to. The != comes from C-like languages.

      • by oodaloop (1229816)
        Normal people wouldn't be on slashdot.
    • Funnily enough, the french word for reluctant is "reticent". (Arrrgh, it's 2012 and Slashdot still doesn't do UTF8 properly...)

      Maybe the original poster has fallen for this common faux pas. The less said about the editors the better.

      • Gracias, I mean >! I did not know that. Perhaps the french nuance does play a role in this. It's always been one of my pet peeves (reticent v. reluctant, lose v. loose) but I will try to be more understanding now that I realize the possible source of this confusion. (and re the UTF8, I agree. That was part of my usage of $\noteq$ instead of the unicode "not equal symbol".)
  • I said in the release article here, you don't see Apple building Microsoft a start menu app and then giving it out for free BECAUSE THAT WOULD BE STUPID! There you go, helping out their #1 competitor.
  • For comparisons sake, it would be interesting to know how many people adopted ios6 in the week prior to the release of google maps. Need a baseline to understand the context, but can't do much with it by itself
  • by adnonsense (826530) on Friday December 21, 2012 @02:51AM (#42356961) Homepage Journal

    My iDevice was running the least-outdated version of iOS 4 and not being too bothered about these things I never got round to updating it. Also, I was a bit leery about installing a new major release until the early adopters had suffered through the kinks. The release of the Google map app, which requires iOS 5.something or later was enough reason to finally upgrade.

  • I jailbreak my IOS device for one very important reason: /etc/hosts. This is VERY important to me. If I access an internet resource, there's nothing stopping it from telling my device, "Hey, also get this other resource without asking the user for permission!" In other words, it speaks on my behalf. My right to free speech also means freedom from compulsory speech. /etc/hosts means that I can control which resources are accessed on my behalf.

    Apple (and all other money-making enterprises) hate this notio

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