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Google Doubts Apple Will Approve Its New Maps Application 347

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the anti-trust-suit-anyone? dept.
redletterdave writes "Even though Apple's App Store has also been friendly enough to offer alternative mapping applications to ameliorate customers upset with Apple's new default Maps app, the Cupertino, Calif.-based company may not be so friendly as to approve a Maps app submission from Google, which used to be responsible for the Maps experience in iOS until the iPhone 5. On Monday, sources at Google familiar with its mapping plans said the chances of Apple approving a dedicated Google Maps app on iOS 6 are 'not optimistic.' Specifically, they pointed to the lack of any mapping app in the 'Find maps for your iPhone' section of the App Store — accessible only via iPhones or iPads — that use the Google Maps APIs to call wirelessly for location, routing or point-of-interest (POI) data."
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Google Doubts Apple Will Approve Its New Maps Application

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  • complain (Score:5, Insightful)

    by irving47 (73147) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @01:11AM (#41890459) Homepage

    loudly and often.

  • by ZipK (1051658) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @01:15AM (#41890477)
    ... to find your way from iOS to Android. Goodbye Apple.
  • by siddesu (698447) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @01:19AM (#41890493)
    well, it is an app market. if you cut off competition just because your product isn't good enough, it smacks of childish spite, mostly. although most of what transpires between apple and the rest of the world recently has been more than a little stupid.
  • Stupid apple (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @01:21AM (#41890503)

    One of the first things Jobs did when he came back was stop the stupid and destructive fight with Microsoft. Now they're doing all they can to pick a fight with Google. My guess: in 10 years, when Apple is on its knees, they'll come crawling back to Google.

  • I liked Apple... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by fullback (968784) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @01:34AM (#41890559)

    I have used Apple and Windows products for over 20 years. I liked my Apple Macbook and use iPads in one of my businesses. We deliver using the iPad maps app and maintained a history using the previous app.

    Imagine losing all that data? That's what Apple did to me with this unannounced change. They put their own selfish agenda above their customers. They could have easily brought back the old app.

    Bastards. I'm tired of both Apple and Windows forcing me to use devices and applications only the way they decide I should use them.

  • Re:complain (Score:5, Insightful)

    by dracocat (554744) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @01:40AM (#41890583)

    Yes. Complain once the app is rejected.

    Then we can have a good dialog about how Apple did not do the right thing. About how it is unfair, and anti-competetive. I can't wait to have that discussion after it gets rejected.

    Only problem is, it hasn't been rejected. How can we have this discussion when so far the only story is that someone at Google doesn't THINK it will be accepted?

  • Re:complain (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ozmanjusri (601766) <aussie_bob@NOsPam.hotmail.com> on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @02:06AM (#41890691) Journal

    Why would Apple give Google any face on this?

    Because they care about their customers and want them to be able to choose the best map application for their own use?

    Nah, just kidding.

  • by maugle (1369813) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @02:29AM (#41890789)

    Translation: I didn't do my due diligence by verifying that the upgrade would allow me to run my business in the way that I've been running it.

    Huh. I typically expect new versions of programs to add functionality, not arbitrarily remove it. Or is it considered common practice now before updating to go over a checklist of every feature of every app you use, to make sure it hasn't disappeared?

    Do you check to make sure each update to the iPhone still lets you make calls?

  • by psiclops (1011105) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @02:55AM (#41890879)

    just because metal is more expensive than plastic, doesn't mean it is better for all purposes.
    what advantage does a metal housing for a phone have over a plastic one?

    in my opinion, plastic is a superior material for the job due to being lighter, non-conductive(not interfering with NFC or other antennas inside the device) and not requiring an outer layer of paint - which is more susceptible to scratches, which are more obvious.

  • Re:complain (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Vintermann (400722) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @03:03AM (#41890919) Homepage

    One of the things you're not allowed to do with a monopoly, is using the power of it to gain a monopoly in a different market. Apple is stepping dangerously close to this any time they disallow an app for competing with iOS built in services/Apple apps. Especially if they didn't offer that app/service before. It's just like Microsoft's Internet Explorer bundling, except MS at least allowed you to install competing products (if not removing their own).

    (And yes, I know the standard argument, that Apple doesn't have a monopoly because other touchscreen phones sell better in aggregate. But this doesn't hold because it's not clear that the touchscreen phone should be the relevant unit for monopoly. If I control the world's fish supply, I can't just claim it's not a monopoly because people eat things other than fish. A monopoly in a limited sphere is still a monopoly.)

  • Re:complain (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mjwx (966435) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @03:19AM (#41890993)

    So basically Google wanted to have tight control over the branding (look and feel?) and add a feature which let Google keep track of where every iOS user is. I can understand why Apple wants to make their own maps in the long run.

    As I said, as much as Apple fans try to spin it, Apple still walked away.

    Apple wont get the chance to make it work in the long term, they ruined it in the short term. For Apple to get a similar dataset to Google would take the better part of a decade.

    First off, Latitude would be opt-in the same as it is on Android, but it gives users the option to use the service if they want.
    Secondly, I'd sooner trust Google who are open about what is being collected and who gets it than Apple, who allow thrid party developers to collect information on you without even notifiying you (also it's automatically enabled and there's no opt out). Seeing as I never opted in to Latitude on Android, I don't have to worry.

    But nice try to spin it. In the end, Apple shot themselves in the foot.

  • Re:complain (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @03:32AM (#41891053)

    So basically Google wanted to have tight control over the branding (look and feel?)

    They wanted to have branding so people would see that app X was pulling google data. Doesn't seem to be all that unreasonable of a request.

    and add a feature which let Google keep track of where every iOS user is

    Uh, no that's fanboy spin. Lattitude, IF you chose to use it, and IF you chose to opt IN (not opt-out), would track you. There are plenty of apps which track "every user's location", for example a weather application, but since that's not Google I guess tracking is OK.

    I can understand why Apple wants to make their own maps in the long run.

    Well, me too. They don't want people to use a product put out by one of their main competitors, but frankly this is starting to get into the "unfair business practices" area (at least in my opinion). But Apple isn't concerned about users being tracked- far from it; they just want to be the ones with the tracking data.

  • Re:complain (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Serious Callers Only (1022605) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @03:55AM (#41891131)

    This is Google doing a few things at once:

    Leaking this story makes sure the press will notice if Apple does delay or reject the app
    Leaking this story helps to explain to users that Google is not the only one deciding to keep Google Maps off iOS.
    Leaking this story helps users pressure Apple to provide the Google Maps app
    Leaking this story puts pressure on Apple and encourages customers to look at Android

    It's perfectly reasonable for them to talk up in advance the fact they are developing this app and will submit soon, given the opaque review process, and Apple's blatant abuse of their control over the ecosystem in the past (banning previous google apps like latitude and google voice for example), which has led to other apps from their competitors languishing in 'review' limbo for months, or having important features yanked (like buying books in the kindle app) because Apple wants a cut of every transaction.

  • Re:complain (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Savage-Rabbit (308260) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @05:01AM (#41891373)

    So basically Google wanted to have tight control over the branding (look and feel?) and add a feature which let Google keep track of where every iOS user is.

    I can understand why Apple wants to make their own maps in the long run.

    As I said, as much as Apple fans try to spin it, Apple still walked away.

    Apple wont get the chance to make it work in the long term, they ruined it in the short term. For Apple to get a similar dataset to Google would take the better part of a decade.

    First off, Latitude would be opt-in the same as it is on Android, but it gives users the option to use the service if they want.

    Secondly, I'd sooner trust Google who are open about what is being collected and who gets it than Apple, who allow thrid party developers to collect information on you without even notifiying you (also it's automatically enabled and there's no opt out). Seeing as I never opted in to Latitude on Android, I don't have to worry.

    But nice try to spin it. In the end, Apple shot themselves in the foot.

    Google is being open about the data they collect? Is this the same Google who got caught circumventing browser security to gather data on user activities? As a Safari browser user I never opted in to Google ad tracking but I got tracked anyway and so did millions of MS IE users. This is all about the ability of soulless Megacorps to track users and their habits in a geographical context right down to the error margin of the GPS system and then profiting from it. Apple would like that data to flow into their own data-mining operation rather than Google's... end of story. It may take Apple a decade to gather enough data but it will doubtless be profitable for them and Google will get some competition so I'm not shedding any tears. There is relatively little I can do to prevent this sort of parasitism anyway. I can, in a way, understand Apple. Voice navigation is kind of a must and if you license, i.e. pay, for access to Google APIs and services a simple "Powered by Google Maps" in the splash screen of your app and the "Help->About" screen should be enough branding, you shouldn't have to wallpaper Google logos all over your app and integrate some crappy social networking system into your app as well as pay for access to maps. Google tracking the movements of every iDevice user on the planet is one helluva bonus without them demanding even more. Apple may have shot themselves in the foot with that maps app of theirs but I can easily understand why they dumped Google Maps.

  • Re:complain (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Solandri (704621) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @06:39AM (#41891733)
    I agree with the reasons you list, and think this whole fiasco is Apple's fault. But there's another possible reason here, one that I think is much more likely:

    Google wants Apple to stew in the mess it created by dropping Google Maps. They want to delay the (re)introduction of Google Maps for iOS for as long as they can without letting Apple's Maps app gain traction. But they don't want people blaming them for the delay. They want people blaming Apple. So they make a lot of noise about how it'll take them a long time to prepare the app, how it's likely Apple will reject it, etc.

    The reason I think it's the more likely reason is because Google doesn't need to create a Google Maps app for iOS. They already have one - the one Apple yanked with iOS 6. Unless their contract with Apple stipulates they can't release it as a regular App Store app, they could've submitted it to the App Store the day after Apple announced iOS 6. If the contract had stipulated that, I think we would've heard of it by now. The anti-Apple PR from saying "We cannot release Google Maps for iOS yet because our contract with Apple prohibits it, and there's still a year left in the contract." would have been priceless.

    They don't even need to delay their app to add turn-by-turn navigation. They can introduce it as-is (as it was in iOS 5). Then roll out an update once they have turn-by-turn navigation ready. So I'm pretty sure the delay in getting Google Maps in the App Store is entirely to make Apple lie in the bed it made for itself.
  • Re:complain (Score:4, Insightful)

    by wvmarle (1070040) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @08:13AM (#41892073)

    There are plenty of apps which track "every user's location", for example a weather application, but since that's not Google I guess tracking is OK.

    That location info is highly anonymous, not linked to a Google account like Latitude. Big difference. Google can subsequently link those movements to your searches and e-mail contents and whatnot.

    Needless to say, I'm not a user of Latitude and will never be.

  • Re:complain (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @08:59AM (#41892293)
    Party A tries to negotiate with Party B to include B's widgetator 9000 in A's iBrick 2014.
    Party B says "yes, but this is what we want from the deal"
    Did party A walk away? YES
  • Re:complain (Score:4, Insightful)

    by webheaded (997188) on Tuesday November 06, 2012 @09:47AM (#41892693) Homepage
    Except that, again, you have to specifically opt into it. So you're not a user...good for you? No one is forced to use the service at all. I don't understand what the point of these comments are.

    I'm not a user either, but I don't care that the feature EXISTS. I just don't use it. Why would anyone care about that thing if they have to turn it on to use it?

Murphy's Law, that brash proletarian restatement of Godel's Theorem. -- Thomas Pynchon, "Gravity's Rainbow"

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