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Apple Hides Samsung Apology So It Can't Be Seen Without Scrolling 743

Posted by timothy
from the why-didn't-you-look-there dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Apple today posted its second Samsung apology to its UK website, complying with requests by the UK Court of Appeal to say its original apology was inaccurate and link to a new statement. As users on Hacker News and Reddit point out, however, Apple modified its website recently to ensure the message is never displayed without visitors having to scroll down to the bottom first."
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Apple Hides Samsung Apology So It Can't Be Seen Without Scrolling

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 03, 2012 @07:46PM (#41868531)

    The lawyers are probably going to get put in front of the bar for their shite advice to these pricks too.

    Banned product, I reckon. And some few billion in compensatory damages to Samsung. It seems the only thing they won't weasel out like a spoilt four-year-old is being slammed down hard financially.

    • by slashmydots (2189826) on Sunday November 04, 2012 @03:18AM (#41870755)
      I'd like to see instead them be required to laser etch the apology into the back of all their products for a year :-D
  • Shameful behaviour (Score:5, Insightful)

    by manicb (1633645) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @07:52PM (#41868579)

    When you've been slapped down for contempt of court, your next action really shouldn't be this kind of open contempt. I wonder how Apple's UK employees feel about this disrespect to their courts?

    • by mschaffer (97223) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @07:55PM (#41868593)

      Do you really think Apple's UK employees really give a damn?

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by rsmith-mac (639075)

        If they don't already, they will when the courts start looking at who to throw in jail for contempt of court.

      • by jmichaelg (148257) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @11:35PM (#41869933) Journal

        They just might care if the judge shuts down Apple UK for an indefinite amount of time. Contempt punishments are entirely up to the judge issuing the punishment.

        I can't for the life of me figure out what Apple thinks they're gaining when they continue to draw attention to the ruling that Samsung didn't infringe.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Bogtha (906264)

      open contempt

      How is this contempt? The message isn't hidden, it's right there on the page. The fact that they optimise the page so that their product shot makes the most of the above-the-fold real estate is not removing it from the page in any way, it's just good design.

      The judge never specified that it had to be in a particular place on the page, or above the fold. And wearing my web developer hat, it's not at all obvious that above the fold was implied to be necessary. If it were me doing it, I

      • by pla (258480) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @10:41PM (#41869611) Journal
        it's just good design.

        Judges don't like "good design". They don't like clever marketing tricks (like the first "apology"). They like absolute, immediate compliance (and not "technical" compliance) with the spirit of their demands.

        Apple needs to suck it up and obey the court's order, or for the next round, you can expect executives to give their apologies on live TV from the inside of a cage.


        If you have clicked on this Slashdot article and are now reading this comment, it is almost certainly below the fold. Yet you read it, right? It's not invisible?

        Do you remember the SlashQuote at the bottom of your page when you wrote that comment? Did you even scroll down far enough to ever see it in the first place?
        • by Xest (935314) on Sunday November 04, 2012 @05:34AM (#41871209)

          Interestingly I notice that I no longer get redirected to the UK site when I go to Apple.com too so it suggests they've disabled that, at least for UK visitors so that people see the US site where the apology is not posted.

          Say I then click store, because I also have to scroll down to notice I'm set to the wrong country on a 1920x1200 monitor and hence proceed anyway, get to the store, and then realise I'm on the US site because all the prices are in dollars not pounds, and then change country it changes it to the page I'm on completely bypassing the front page where the notice is.

          They've gone out their way to try and avoid people seeing this. I do hope the judges are made very aware and that they are properly punished as a result.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by mysidia (191772)

        How is this contempt? The message isn't hidden, it's right there on the page. The fact that they optimise the page so that their product shot makes the most of the above-the-fold real estate is not removing it from the page in any way, it's just good design.

        This is an error in the judgement, not an error in Apple's behavior.

        Although I will say: the message is not just below the fold; it's below the content on the page e.g. it's below even Apple's copyright statement; which suggests it's just a disc

        • by AmiMoJo (196126) * <mojo@NOspaM.world3.net> on Sunday November 04, 2012 @06:49AM (#41871389) Homepage

          If the Judge was serious about the prominence of the disclaimer; they should have ordered Apple to display a prominent message. Submit a 'draft' copy of their home page for the judges approval, publish it.

          This isn't school detention, the judge isn't a teacher who has to make sure his pupils comply. The judge expected Apple to behave like adults and not be dicks about it. Apparently that was an error in judgement and Apple will be punished for it, just like a school child would be.

          Hopefully next they will be required to just replace the entire front page with a click-through notice.

      • by _xeno_ (155264) on Sunday November 04, 2012 @12:24AM (#41870125) Homepage Journal

        How is this contempt? The message isn't hidden, it's right there on the page. The fact that they optimise the page so that their product shot makes the most of the above-the-fold real estate is not removing it from the page in any way, it's just good design.

        Oh, bullshit. Try this: go to Apple's US page [apple.com] (which is "apple.com" which I'm guessing will redirect in other countries, and apparently you can't just add /us/ to force it to stay in the US, so, you may have to pick a random country if you're actually in the UK) and compare it to the UK version of the page [apple.com]. Notice anything different?

        You might not, if the browser isn't large enough, but I'm typing this on a 1920x1200 display with the browser sized to the maximum height. With that, on the US page, the entire page is visible, including the header. On the UK page, the content is sized off the bottom.

        If you throw the page into Responsive Design View in Firefox (Ctrl-Shift-M) and start playing with the size, you'll notice that they explicitly designed the page to size the apology off the bottom. (Well, almost: they give up if you manage to get your browser view to be greater than 1600 pixels tall.)

        That's not "using above the fold real estate," not when it's optimized to not display on anything less than 1600 pixels tall. That's called "being as asshole" at the least and, I expect, will turn into being called "found in contempt of court."

  • by future assassin (639396) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @07:58PM (#41868609) Homepage

    WTF are they a Lindsay Lohan of the computer world?

  • Apple managers are apparently unaware that sneaky behavior is likely to get a big story on Slashdot.
  • by compro01 (777531) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @08:07PM (#41868685)

    I wonder exactly how much patience the judges have for this kind of nonsense.

    • by Zocalo (252965) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @08:34PM (#41868879) Homepage
      Probably very little, given how quickly they reacted to Apple ignoring the spirit of the law last week. Frankly, I'm stunned that Apple seriously expected that any kind of special treatment of the message posting wasn't doing to get picked up given the level of tech press interest in the UK - the story has even been on the front page of the BBC news site. I'm guessing we'll have wait a few days to find out whether they are going to get another chance to do the right thing by the spirit of the law, or we're just going to go straight to contempt of court and see some more serious punitive action - like having to put the message in place of that nice picture of the iPad Mini.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 03, 2012 @08:27PM (#41868843)

    On my 2560x1600 monitor with the browser maximized i have to scroll to see the text. Yup, I would say it is definitely fishy.

  • Four links. (Score:4, Informative)

    by thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) <marc.paradise@NOSpaM.gmail.com> on Saturday November 03, 2012 @08:46PM (#41868953) Homepage Journal

    There are four links (2x thenextweb, ycombinator, and reddit) in the summary and none of them actually point to the web site [apple.com] or the actual statement [apple.com]. Was this really the best submission for this story?

  • Facts... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by imagined.by (2589739) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @08:49PM (#41868977)

    How about some facts.

    First, the UK website has had this responsive layout for weeks. Also, most other country-specific landing pages of Apple use the same layout (for example German, Austrian websites). With the notable exception being the US site.

    Second, Apple was laughed at for claiming to need 2 weeks to implement the new statement on their website. While I agree I could fix something like that in 5 minutes, you just don't fiddle around in the CSS of such a website. In addition to drafting a new text, you have to adjust the code and actually test it, which can't be done in a few days. That the court demanded Apple to fix this in 48hrs, just goes to show how much they understand about this.

    • Re:Facts... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 03, 2012 @09:15PM (#41869161)

      Well, if 48 hours was an unreasonable amount of time to make this change, perhaps Apple should have complied with the original order which gave them 14 days. Instead of, you know, being giant cocks about it.

    • by arielCo (995647)

      p>First, the UK website has had this responsive layout for weeks. Also, most other country-specific landing pages of Apple use the same layout (for example German, Austrian websites). With the notable exception being the US site.

      Umm, they put the notice *just outside* the fitted area. That says a lot.

      • It also returns you to the top of the page if you start in full screen, restore and then maximize the page. You can not maintain your view of that portion of the page if you desire.
        • Re:Facts... (Score:5, Interesting)

          by poly_pusher (1004145) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @10:14PM (#41869501)
          Holy crap there's more, it also clips off the top of the page if it is too short vertically, but maintains the bottom of the page being just above the statement. They are sacrificing viewing their page navigation to ensure the bottom of the page isn't viewed...
    • Re:Facts... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by swillden (191260) <shawn-ds@willden.org> on Saturday November 03, 2012 @09:31PM (#41869249) Homepage Journal

      you have to adjust the code and actually test it, which can't be done in a few days

      Huh what? It takes more than a few days to test a change like adding some text to the bottom of a web page? Granted that there are multiple browsers and configurations to test, but even manually that's not more than a few hours' work... and if Apple's web site is managed by competent engineers they should have automated tests for that anyway. This sort of change should take minutes, not days, much less weeks.

  • by arielCo (995647) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @08:51PM (#41868995)

    apple.com/uk vs apple.com on a 1600-px high screen [imgur.com]. I had to hit F11 *after* loading apple.com/uk to include the notice in the screen capture.

    Pretty sleazy.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 03, 2012 @09:08PM (#41869103)

    It's getting harder and harder to defend Apple.

    It's 1997, they're near bankruptcy, and St. Steve comes back to save them. They're the underdog, and we cheer for them.

    The iMac comes out. OSX comes out. The iBook comes out, with wifi standard, and they start cementing their reputation for avant-garde design paired with avant-garde architecture.

    The iPod comes out, and they're clearly on a roll.

    Then, the iPhone. Very nice device, miles ahead of everything else, but one niggling problem: the walled garden. Still, that's perfectly defensible: simply a way to preempt any virii, right?

    Then they start bricking phones that are jailbroken. WTF, Apple? It's malicious behavior, and can't be explained away by any desire to stop viruses: people who jailbreak aren't Apple's responsibility, they chose that path and Apple should let them walk it.

    Then, once Android starts to get really competitive, the suing starts. Sure, some of it may be technically correct - they won a number of their cases, around the world, and phones like the Galaxy S were pretty clearly rip-offs. But Apple wasn't just standing up for its rights, it was competing in the courtrooms instead of the marketplace. They had stopped being the underdog that succeeded through innovation (not invention, innovation - look it up), and started being the establishment that succeeded through inertia and bullying as much as anything else.

    And now, they descend even further, and behave petulantly, seeming to agree with the law when it serves their interests and flaunt the law when it doesn't. From a company that advances the state of the art to a company that wants to freeze the state of the art for purely selfish reasons.

  • by Chris Mattern (191822) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @09:32PM (#41869261)

    Will be down in the basement, in the dark, with no stairs, in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying 'Beware of the Leopard'.

  • Code in question (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 03, 2012 @09:42PM (#41869341)

    var HeroResize=AC.Class({initialize:function(b){this._height=null;this._hero=$(b);
    AC.Object.synthesize(this);this.__boundResizeHero=this.resizeHero.bindAsEventListener(this);
    if(typeof window.ontouchstart==="undefined"){this.resizeHero();Event.observe(window,"resize",this.__boundResizeHero)
    }},setHeight:function(b){this._height=(b<0)?0:b;return this._height},resizeHero:function(){this.setHeight(parseInt(window.innerHeight||(window.document.documentElement.clientHeight||window.document.body.clientHeight),10)-310);
    this.hero().style.height=this.height()+"px"}});Event.onDOMReady(function(){var b=new HeroResize("billboard")
    });

    That hides the bottom 310px of the page no matter what screen resolution is used.

    Page with javascript [imgur.com]
    Page without javascript [imgur.com]

  • by happyhamster (134378) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @09:46PM (#41869369)

    Clear contempt of court. Fine them so it really hurts. Say an annual Apple's revenue or so. Lesson will be learned and not just by them.

  • "Below The Fold" (Score:3, Informative)

    by guttentag (313541) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @11:09PM (#41869775) Journal

    ...Apple modified its website recently to ensure the message is never displayed without visitors having to scroll down to the bottom first.

    The industry-term for something on your home page that you have to scroll to see is "below the fold." It comes from the newspaper industry. A standard broadsheet [wikipedia.org] format newspaper (as opposed to a tabloid [wikipedia.org]) would sit on a newsstand or in a news box folded in half. With this in mind, the layout editors intentionally put the most important stories "above the fold" on the front page, and the less-important stories that are still important enough to be front-page news go "below the fold."

    Putting something below the fold, whether in print or online, is not hiding it. It's still on the front page. It's just saying "this isn't the most important content on the page." And in this case, the forced apology is not the most important content on Apple's home page... Apple sells products and services, not apologies. If the judges felt it was that important, they would have specified it had to be above the fold or at the top. But they didn't. Quite possibly because the concept of something being below the fold is foreign to them, since the British journalistic diet consists primarily of tabloids, which are designed to scream, "EVERYTHING ON THIS PAGE IS IMPORTANT! BUY ME NOW!!!"

    • by bloodhawk (813939) on Saturday November 03, 2012 @11:52PM (#41870003)
      Ordering the apology be put on their web page was done so that customers would see the apology, it is therefore apparent that the court wanted the apology to be plainly visible. Public apologies are ordered by the courts all the time and screwing around with them even while remaining within the strict letter of the order is blatant contempt of court and is generally treated severely by the courts. Add to that, apple seem to have removed the redirect from the US site to the UK one it becomes more obvious that apples intention here is to go against the spirit of the order by ensuring as few people see it as possible. Apple are playing chicken with the courts, somehow I don't think the courts will swerve first.
  • sosumi (Score:4, Funny)

    by drew30319 (828970) on Sunday November 04, 2012 @10:01AM (#41872013) Homepage Journal
    The copyright DIV appearing directly above the "Samsung apology" is aptly named / placed:

    </div> <!--/sosumi--><p class="statement">On 25 October 2012, Apple Inc. published a statement on its UK website in relation to Samsung's Galaxy tablet computers. [ ... ]

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