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Apple's Secret Plan To Join iPhones With Airport Security 232

Posted by samzenpus
from the do-you-consent-to-an-isearch dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "Currently — as most of us know — TSA agents briefly examine government ID and boarding passes as each passenger presents their documents at a checkpoint at the end of a security line. Thom Patterson writes at CNN that under a 2008 Apple patent application that was approved in July and filed under the working title "iTravel," a traveler's phone would automatically send electronic identification to a TSA agent as soon as the traveler got in line and as each traveler waits in line. TSA agents would examine the electronic ID at an electronic viewing station. Next, at the X-ray stations, a traveler's phone would confirm to security agents that the traveler's ID had already been checked. Apple's patent calls for the placement of special kiosks (PDF) around the airport which will automatically exchange data with your phone via a close range wireless technology called near field communication (NFC). Throughout the process, the phone photo could be displayed on a screen for comparison with the traveler. Facial recognition software could be included in the process. Several experts say a key question that must be answered is: How would you prove that the phone is yours? To get around this problem, future phones or electronic ID may require some form of biometric security function including photo, fingerprint and photo retinal scan comparisons. Of course, there is still a ways to go. If consumers, airlines, airports and the TSA don't embrace the NFC kiosks, experts say it's unlikely Apple's vision would become reality. 'First you would have to sell industry on Apple's idea. Then you'd have to sell it to travel consumers,' says Neil Hughes of Apple Insider. 'It's a chicken-and-egg problem.'"
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Apple's Secret Plan To Join iPhones With Airport Security

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  • A 1984 device ? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Taco Cowboy (5327) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:27PM (#41393981) Journal

    The irony is that the "1984" theme became one of the most successful ad campaign for Apple back then ...

    • Re:A 1984 device ? (Score:4, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:46PM (#41394177)

      how about they just fuck the TSA right off, and everyone can go back to being chilled and not freaking out about being on a plane. TSA has stopped 0 terrorists, but has sexually assulted millions.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @09:12PM (#41394705)

        I don't know if I mind if millions of terrorist get sexually assualted.

      • by 0100010001010011 (652467) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @09:18PM (#41394757)

        The TSA is actually a wonderful institution that has brought cheap healthcare to thousands in America.

        Now if I take a fall and am afraid I broke something rather than go to the ER and get an X-Ray ($500). Pay the hospital for their time ($500) and then pay the Doctor. ($1000) I just buy the cheapest plane ticket ($200) I can find and go through security with change in my pockets. Enough times that I can get a few good views of the problem.

        • Re:A 1984 device ? (Score:4, Insightful)

          by JasterBobaMereel (1102861) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @04:03AM (#41396541)

          ...or you could move to a country with a healthcare service ....rather than a system run for the benefit of insurance companies

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Patent Lover (779809)

        how about they just fuck the TSA right off, and everyone can go back to being chilled and not freaking out about being on a plane. TSA has stopped 0 terrorists, but has sexually assulted millions.

        If only I had mod points. Can we bury this fucking national embarrassment and waste of our tax money already.

      • I think they were inspired by the "It just works" campaign, and thought just having an iDevice on hand will make security "just work".

    • by jazman_777 (44742) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:50PM (#41394211) Homepage
      I guess we all just assumed that the hammer-throwing chick represented Apple.
    • Re:A 1984 device ? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by aurispector (530273) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:54PM (#41394249)

      Cell phones are becoming less about communications and more about tracking and identification. Pretty soon big brother isn't going to let you leave home without it.

      1984 was a warning, not an instruction manual.

      • Re:A 1984 device ? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Mitreya (579078) <mitreyaNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @08:18PM (#41394403)

        Cell phones are becoming less about communications and more about tracking and identification.

        It's a good thing that not every phone is an iPhone then, huh.
        If their patent works out, they are sure to make this iTravel thing a permanent and non-removable staple of iPhone 6S or whatever it'll be by then.

      • Re:A 1984 device ? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by The Grim Reefer (1162755) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @12:07AM (#41395635)

        Cell phones are becoming less about communications and more about tracking and identification. Pretty soon big brother isn't going to let you leave home without it.

        1984 was a warning, not an instruction manual.

        I travel a fair bit for work. Not nearly as much as I used to as I've been trying to travel less. I'm probably a little older than the average /. reader too. But every now an then I end up at the airport and am not in a totally self absorbed rush and it really scares the shit out of me what we have allowed our government to take away from us.

        Air travel has truly made me think that many of the nightmarish versions of the future that were envisioned decades ago are, at least in part, coming true. Anywhere you stand in an airport you hear a repeated announcement every two minutes. Basically an authoritative voice telling you what you can carry on the plane. Or that your bag will be taken and destroyed if you leave it unattended. Or not to trust anyone and report suspicious behavior. It's a far cry from the first time I flew when you were more likely to hear jingles about flying the friendly skies

        Now you get herded through scanners and treated like a criminal. Particularly if you forgot that bottle of water in your carry-on. And the way I have seen people treated who choose to not go through the (non-monitored by sane practices) radiation emitting scanners is terrifying. On multiple occasions I've seen several TSA employees loudly make fun of these people. It's a far cry from the days when you were treated like a valued customer and respected as a person by the people at the airport.

        When I stop to take the time to actually watch and listen to what is happening at airport today; and try to remember my mindset of how things once were I find it's a shame how our way of life has been altered by those in power. I don't know if the cause was Bin Laden and his cowardly attacks on this country. Or if our leaders chose to use it as an excuse to do this themselves. Either way, it saddens me to think that we have lost our way.

        • Re:A 1984 device ? (Score:4, Insightful)

          by dargaud (518470) <slashdot2NO@SPAMgdargaud.net> on Thursday September 20, 2012 @06:05AM (#41397049) Homepage

          Anywhere you stand in an airport you hear a repeated announcement every two minutes. Basically an authoritative voice telling you [...]

          When I saw Strange Days [imdb.com] in 1995, with its constant authoritative announcements in the background, I thought it was bad science fiction. Then it happened.

    • Re:A 1984 device ? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @08:17PM (#41394395)

      Oh for fuck's sake. When you buy an airline ticket your entire life history is available for the taking. You are not traveling anonymously or privately. You are known to the TSA before you ever step into the airline terminal. If you want to blame someone, start with DHS and the TSA. Apple isn't selling you out, your government sold you out.

      • Re:A 1984 device ? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @09:15PM (#41394727)

        If you want to blame someone, start with DHS and the TSA. Apple isn't selling you out, your government sold you out.

        Close but you're one level too shallow which is .. typical. DHS and TSA are effects. Not causes.

        The causes are a bunch of Americans who think being fat and stupid is acceptable. They care a LOT more about who the next American Idol will be, or which football team wins a game (athletes == the really rich people nobody hates) than they do about our progress along a path to our own brand of fascism. Ever see mindless football fans jumping up and down, yelling and screaming etc. over a touchdown? If they got half that concerned and excited about freedom (real freedom, not the "freedom to tell other people how to live" bullshit) we wouldn't HAVE a TSA.

        Fat stupid people who aren't terribly aware of what's going on is an environment. Government tyranny is an organism that thrives in this particular environment. It is not hard to understand. It's just hard for immature minds to accept because there is no nice fluffy-bunny way to say it that will never offend anybody. And to immature minds, being inoffensive no matter how low of a priority that should be in the face of bigger problems, is much more important than dealing with reality.

        • by AK Marc (707885)
          Shouldn't you be going on your "fat people" rant in the BPA thread?
        • Re:A 1984 device ? (Score:5, Interesting)

          by kilfarsnar (561956) on Thursday September 20, 2012 @11:49AM (#41400295)

          If you want to blame someone, start with DHS and the TSA. Apple isn't selling you out, your government sold you out.

          Close but you're one level too shallow which is .. typical. DHS and TSA are effects. Not causes. The causes are a bunch of Americans who think being fat and stupid is acceptable. They care a LOT more about who the next American Idol will be, or which football team wins a game (athletes == the really rich people nobody hates) than they do about our progress along a path to our own brand of fascism. Ever see mindless football fans jumping up and down, yelling and screaming etc. over a touchdown? If they got half that concerned and excited about freedom (real freedom, not the "freedom to tell other people how to live" bullshit) we wouldn't HAVE a TSA. Fat stupid people who aren't terribly aware of what's going on is an environment. Government tyranny is an organism that thrives in this particular environment. It is not hard to understand. It's just hard for immature minds to accept because there is no nice fluffy-bunny way to say it that will never offend anybody. And to immature minds, being inoffensive no matter how low of a priority that should be in the face of bigger problems, is much more important than dealing with reality.

          While I agree with you overall assessment of the attention level of the American people, I would point out that they are lied to and manipulated by the media and Corporate America, and whomever the CIA has working at ABC, CBS and NBC these days. People are conditioned to think America is just the definition of awesomeness. And awesome doesn't promote fascism. So a lot of them will not come to the conclusion on their own that Uncle Sam is slowly straight-jacketing them.

          Some of us are naturally suspicious and skeptical of authority. I'm guessing you fall into that category. I know I do. From the moment I heard the US referred to as the "Homeland" I knew something was up. That is a very loaded word that was never used to describe our country before 9/11. But most people are too busy getting through their daily lives to pay attention to higher concepts like control of a population though fear, distraction and subtle intimidation. One can't think about that stuff when he is worried about how to make the rent this month.

          The elite who rule this country understand that people can't really consider their position if they are scrambling for basic needs. A lot of people, when under stress, will look for escape. It is provided in the forms of vapid TV, infotainent "news", and shallow consumerism. The rulers have always understood the value of bread and circuses; today is no different. So I agree that the people of this country need to wake up and smell the authoritarianism. But I also know that there are forces arrayed against them that many are not equipped to resist.

    • Re:A 1984 device ? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by EricThribb (2670171) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @08:56PM (#41394619)
      Apple always makes me think of George Orwell - just that it's Animal Farm rather than 1984 that springs to mind
    • Re:A 1984 device ? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by DragonTHC (208439) <Dragon@NoSPAM.gamerslastwill.com> on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @10:37PM (#41395175) Homepage Journal

      That's not irony.

      Who will a stolen iPhone identify?

  • by swschrad (312009) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:29PM (#41394001) Homepage Journal

    which hasn't happened yet.

    • by Severus Snape (2376318) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:51PM (#41394217)
      iPhone 6, duh. Apple's phones are pretty predictable these days, new tech comes a cycle late.
      • by pnot (96038) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @08:14PM (#41394373)

        iPhone 6, duh. Apple's phones are pretty predictable these days, new tech comes a cycle late.

        The first phone with NFC was the Nokia 6131, which came out a year before the first iPhone. So maybe new tech comes six cycles late...

        • Nice fact but you know what I mean, NFC is now a expected feature for the top of the range smart phones but Apple have done LTE this cycle, NFC next cycle.
          • by pnot (96038)

            Well yes, I was half-joking. But I feel as though they're more like two cycles behind on this -- 2011 was when NFC really hit the mainstream, there was a fair bit of speculation [computerworld.com] that the 4S would have it.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by BasilBrush (643681)

            Nice fact but you know what I mean, NFC is now a expected feature for the top of the range smart phones

            Why? I've never seen a place where you can use it. Similar schemes for cards/devices to replace small change etc. have failed to find any traction many times before.

            As it stands for those phones that have it, at best it's a pointless novelty.

            If Apple introduce it it'll be when and if it gains traction, or if before that, it'll be when Apple themselves can put together enough partners to make it worthwhile.

            • Yes you have seen it, just not on your phone its on you credit/debit card. Only its called paypass or blink but the technology is the same.

              • by afidel (530433)

                Hehe, a similar tech is already in the passport, most western passports now include RFID chips. Now we just need Congress to withhold highway funds until the states include RFID in drivers licenses and we're at the same end goal without needing an expensive smartphone with a charged battery available.

                • GPs point was that whenever you see a terminal with PayPass marking, you can use an NFC-enabled phone to pay there. At least this is the case with Google Wallet on Android.

      • New? They just haven't invented it yet.

    • You could do it without NFC. You could use WiFi or Bluetooth or many other technologies. Personally I think it would work even better without any of those.

      The PreCheck system in airports just relies on uploading your photo ID. In fact that seems like the easiest and most secure system all around. But it would require all of the states opening up their ID photos to one database. Then when you walk up to the airport. The facial recognition could confirm that you're on the list of airline tickets registe

      • by icebike (68054) *

        No, you can't do it with wifi or bluetooth. The range is too great, and its too easy to hack.

        Actually you can't do any of this stuff at all, because as soon as TSA authorizes any of this stuff, the other
        phone makers are going to be in court demanding no special favors to one company.

        Its a useless patent, because government wouldn't dare try to implement it.

  • Apple's patent calls for the placement of special kiosks (PDF) around the airport which will automatically exchange data with your phone via a close range wireless technology called near field communication (NFC).

  • by Kittenman (971447) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:32PM (#41394033)
    I've attended a couple of Tech conferences where the presenters seem to assume that
    - everyone is, or will be on Facebook
    - everyone has, or will have an Apple device (iphone or ipad)

    All rather short-sighted. In the past we've seen new ideas come along and be embraced by society and then abandoned. Skateboard parks, CB radios, kung fu ...

    Not to say that Apple doesn't have a large customer base now - but it won't always. Is it really that worthwhile to introduce special handling for people with a special type of device?
    • by 0123456 (636235) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:33PM (#41394051)

      Clearly once this technology was introduced, owning an iPhone would become compulsory for travellers who didn't want to be butt probed.

      • iThought of it first. Mine!

        But will it also photograph and then lase the polyps it finds. Put that in your Instagram.

        Okay. I am going no further with this.

      • by mjwx (966435)

        Clearly once this technology was introduced, owning an iPhone would become compulsory for travellers who didn't want to be butt probed.

        Actually, it prepares travelers to be probed. They already take it up the Jacksie from Apple, why not the TSA too.

    • Not to say that Apple doesn't have a large customer base now - but it won't always. Is it really that worthwhile to introduce special handling for people with a special type of device?

      You mean for the security theater that didn't exist a decade years ago in a type of travel terminal that didn't exist a century ago? Stop kidding yourself: nothing lasts forever.

    • by trout007 (975317) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @09:10PM (#41394685)

      It depends. Consumers had abandoned General Motors and drove them into bankruptcy. But luckily for them they own enough politicians so they just stole $50 Billion from Bond holders and another $50 Billion from the same people that won't buy their cars and BOOM back in business making cars nobody wants.

    • by c0lo (1497653)

      I've attended a couple of Tech conferences where the presenters seem to assume that
      - everyone is, or will be on Facebook
      - everyone has, or will have an Apple device (iphone or ipad)

      All rather short-sighted.

      Short-sighted you say? Well, what more sort-sighted do you want when a big company (not related with the defense sector) assumes that TSA is forever or at least for long enough to construct a business case on its existence.

      The worst is not that Apple would be wrong... on the contrary, the worst is that it makes business sense already to capitalize on the "sheepness factor" of the consumers (can't even be called customers) which will accept the govt invasion on their rights without limits (at least, no tempo

    • by kommakazi (610098)
      I don't think Apple assumed everyone would have an iPhone in applying for this patent. they were simply positioning themselves to be the first to offer this type of service and roadblock the competition should it become viable.
  • ... that shouldn't even be a problem in the first place. What's so wrong with passports again? They already have various other security (like RFID chips, iirc), and they're much more tightly controlled than phones you can buy off ebay.

  • by Scowler (667000) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:39PM (#41394105)

    We have RFID tags in our passports already, so they are already moving us towards electronic IDs. It's a foregone conclusion that the type of ID done for international flights will eventually crop up in domestic travel as well, for better or worse.

    Consumers won't fight phone ID provided there is some added convenience that comes with it. Perhaps if we didn't have to remove shoes, for example (even though that security theatre seems unrelated to digital identification).

    • by Tough Love (215404) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:41PM (#41394123)

      Why should Apple allow the US government to own a monopoly on creepiness?

    • by mgbastard (612419)

      We have RFID tags in our passports already, so they are already moving us towards electronic IDs. It's a foregone conclusion that the type of ID done for international flights will eventually crop up in domestic travel as well, for better or worse.

      I microwave any RFID they dare to put in my papers. So should you.

      "oh? no workee? I have a magnetic personality. Electronics just fail around my person."

    • by fermion (181285)
      And how is this new, or secure? Presumably they could already receive signals from our phone. The US government has already received records from all the phone companies, and there is no reason to believe that those records are not updated in a an effectively continuous fashion. The only reason that they may not continuously track us using our phones is that the communication and computing hardware is simply too expensive. This is why paranoid people buy prepaid cell phones and then minutes with cash.
      • by Scowler (667000)
        I am not saying this is new, or secure, or even a good idea. It just seems to be what US policymakers have decreed.
  • Time to move to a nice "backward" country, where this might be 10-20 years late or completely derailed by other considerations. This serves the system, not the consumer or citizen.
  • by Frosty Piss (770223) * on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:44PM (#41394147)

    Apple submitted the patent in 2008, it was approved in July, and both Slashdot and CNN are talking about it today, so this is "secret" HOW?

    In all likelihood, it would be a service that would be available *IF YOU WANT IT*

    Christ, people, if you suffer from this type of PARANOIA regularly, seek professional help.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      > In all likelihood, it would be a service that would be available *IF YOU WANT IT*
      Just like using SSN for anything but social security...oh wait...

    • by mounthood (993037) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @08:02PM (#41394297)

      In all likelihood, it would be a service that would be available *IF YOU WANT IT*

      Christ, people, if you suffer from this type of PARANOIA regularly, seek professional help.

      Optional today, required tomorrow. But don't worry because it'll work with Android and Windows Phone 8, and you'll get to choose the software you like best!

      Swearing about PARANOIA seems more than a little unfair since the government has tried this strategy -- but without the iPhone -- before. It looks like they're currently calling it TSA PreCheck [tsa.gov] but they'll probably change it to "PhoneCheck".

      • Optional today, required tomorrow.

        Last time I checked, Smart Phones were not required by government decree.

    • by Mitreya (579078) <mitreyaNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @08:24PM (#41394439)

      In all likelihood, it would be a service that would be available *IF YOU WANT IT*

      Indeed. To give a more recent example (than SSN given by someone else), consider the electronic toll-booths.

      First, it was a discount pilot program for those who want it

      Then it was a normal-price convenience

      Then the cash-booths dwindled to one or two per road

      And I have already ran into some booths in Illinois with "no human operator present". And ran into something like that in Canada (no cash payment option, apparently, but they can charge and fine you later with plate recognition)

      It doesn't even take that long to go from "optional convenience" to "optional if you like to suffer and pay extra"

      • The Illinois system is free* to sign up

        *$10 refundable deposit/$40 prepaid tolls you do get the prepaid tolls back when you close your account.

        You do need to buy a cell phone + data plan to use it.

      • by jhobbs (659809)
        Personal problem. You choose to live in a state where toll roads are a legal option for funds generation for the state highway department. We have four constitutional branches of government in Arkansas. Executive, Legislative, Judicial, and Transportation. Since they can't spend money they don't have (constitutional pay-as-you-go state) they only way to go into debt is to ask voters to approve a bond and associated increase in tax. No toll booths. Never had em, never will. I'm sure if they did build
        • by afidel (530433)

          Are you seriously holding up Arkansas government as a model for anything but failure?

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      if you suffer from this type of PARANOIA regularly, seek professional help.

      Trust a psychiatrist? .. that's crazy talk!

    • by Waccoon (1186667)

      Christ, people, if you suffer from this type of PARANOIA regularly, seek professional help.

      I'll be sure to echo that back to you when you get an $800 speeding ticket you can't refute in court for whateverreasontheycanthinkof.

  • It will be yet another reason to not have an iPhone.
    • by EGSonikku (519478)

      Yeah, because no one else uses technology to make life easier. And doing so is evil. Apparently.

  • by jd659 (2730387) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @07:53PM (#41394235)
    Per previous /. article, leave your cell phone at home: http://yro.slashdot.org/story/12/09/04/1552228/leave-your-cellphone-at-home-says-jacob-appelbaum [slashdot.org]
    • by siddesu (698447)
      I say we should go all the way and travel naked and blindfolded. That ought to solve all problems.
    • or just don't charge the battery and it be dead when you get to the airport, and toss one of the AA-battery powered phone chargers in your carry-on and charge it in route to your destination.

  • by Guspaz (556486) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @08:05PM (#41394319)

    Somehow a publicly published idea about how to get people through airport security faster and easier is now a "secret plan for searching you at the airport" and comments equating it to all sorts of nasty things...

    It's a public patent, and the goal of the thing is clearly the opposite of what everybody seems to be claiming...

  • by kromozone (817261) on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @08:14PM (#41394381) Homepage
    I've spent most of my life reading patents for money. No one, at any company, gives a crap about right and wrong. If it's a novel idea and you think there's some chance of making money on it, you patent it. I'd be reviewing applications for Zyklon B if there was a way to monetize murder.
  • And then you would have to sell me an iPhone. Urrp.
    • by Culture20 (968837)
      Or get Congress to force you to buy one. They can do that now according to the Supremes (assuming you're American).
      • by causality (777677)

        (assuming you're American)

        Don't worry, they have some of the best working on that one. All they have to do is raise a big enough stink over enough time and artificially generate enough of an outcry. Then they will manage to "harmonize" all of the "security laws" the same way they have internationally harmonized so many copyright laws.

        After all, you don't want the terrorists to win.

      • by afidel (530433)

        No, they actually can't force you to buy one, they can however levy a tax on you if you fail to buy one (a perhaps subtle but important distinction, one expands the commerce clause the other relies on the taxing power).

  • I just read about it on Slashdot.org
  • and ATT will tie a added fee to this and get apple to lock it down.

  • This sounds like a "Proto" version of Apple's "Passbook" app that launched today, alongside iOS6. Not the security part, but flight boarding passes, and expanded beyond travel for movie theater tickets, gift cards and what not.

    http://www.apple.com/ios/whats-new/#passbook [apple.com]

    I'm not seeing a secret apple conspiracy plan, and even if there was one, they decided against NFC and went with Passbook.

  • by Yaztromo (655250) <.moc.cam. .ta. .omortzay.> on Wednesday September 19, 2012 @09:11PM (#41394695) Homepage Journal

    Before too many more people go off half-cocked, please allow me to remind everyone that every major tech company, particularly Apple, patents all sorts of crazy stuff that they never use. Here is an article [maclife.com] detailing 10 patents from the last few years (the article is a year old) of crazy things that had /.ers (and others) predicting all sorts of weird and crazy stuff -- and not a single product has been released using any of them.

    Remember when Apple patented touch gestures for the rear of an iPhone-like device? In the four or five iPhones released since then, have they ever implemented it? No. Seems doubtful they ever will at this point.

    I'd wait until such a device actually exists in the wild before getting excited about it. Like a lot of companies, Apple simply builds up their patent portfolio for offensive and defensive purposes.

    Yaz

  • This might be worth talking about if Apple made anything that has NFC, but they don't.
  • I would like to think Apple would be against such intrusive invasions of privacy and human rights. Oh, hold on, look at Foxconn. Apple continues to support that company and its practices.
  • I think people are idiots. The chicken and egg problem isn't a cause and effect problem. It's a language definition problem. The question's the only issue.

    1. eggs came first because lizards laid eggs long before chickens evolved. so we're talking about "chicken eggs" not "eggs". So we rephrase: "what came first, the chicken or the chicken egg"

    2. at some point, something that wasn't a chicken laid an egg from which a chicken hatched

    3. if your definition of a "chicken egg" is "laid by a chicken", then th

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