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Microsoft Patents The Courts Apple

Microsoft, IBM Want to Seal Patents Agreements With Samsung 126

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the nothing-to-see-here dept.
sfcrazy writes "The court battle between Apple and Samsung has created the possibility of disclosing the cross patent agreement between Microsoft and Samsung. Microsoft is suddenly scared and has filed a motion asking the court to seal the cross license agreement. I would like to remind that the Judge has asked both parties to make all the filings in this dispute available to the public for free." And on Monday, IBM filed for a restraining order to prevent Reuters from publishing their agreement with Samsung as well.
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Microsoft, IBM Want to Seal Patents Agreements With Samsung

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  • by dkf (304284) <donal.k.fellows@manchester.ac.uk> on Tuesday July 31, 2012 @04:05AM (#40826155) Homepage

    One, there are no software patents in Europe.

    Wrong, but the obviousness requirement is applied much more stringently so there are far fewer software patents granted. Getting a patent for being 6 months ahead of the competition is a problem, getting one for being 15 years ahead is not.

  • by Areyoukiddingme (1289470) on Tuesday July 31, 2012 @04:21AM (#40826207)

    ...IBM's motion to prevent Reuters from publishing what IBM gave them has been denied already. Those of a conspiracy turn of mind will now cue the old boy network where IBM execs get together with Reuter's execs at the Old Boys Club and work out what Reuters gets for not publishing after all.

    Reuters may gleefully print the whole thing, but that seems unlikely. More likely they'll excerpt it anyway, even without any alleged backroom deals.

    I know I know, I read TFA. I'm sorry... it won't happen again.

  • by andrewbaldwin (442273) on Tuesday July 31, 2012 @04:22AM (#40826211)

    I think I agree with you but I have no idea wtf a pram is.

    Pram is a common shortening of "perambulator" ** -- a baby carriage on wheels. These days they're not so common as baby buggies (smaller lightweight versions) have taken their place as 'traditional' prams were bigger, heavier coachbuilt affairs - more room for the baby and with bigger wheels/better suspension but not very practical for transporting in cars.

    Throwing ones toys out of the pram is a common expression in the UK. It's roughly equivalent to "throwing a hissy fit" / "having a tantrum" -- ie exhibiting impotent rage and/or childish behaviour, making a lot of noise and fuss yet gaining nothing but causing inconvenience to others as they have to retrieve them [or not]

    ** Perambulator - in the sense it let the baby and carer go for a walk (perambulate) -- Old fashioned and I don't know anyone who still says perambulator these days [or even said it in my childhood many years ago]

  • by Deorus (811828) on Tuesday July 31, 2012 @04:31AM (#40826255)

    It's about the patent deals, not the patents themselves. It is a lot more likely that both companies are afraid of being investigated for monopolistic behavior if those deals become public knowledge.

  • by Teun (17872) on Tuesday July 31, 2012 @06:32AM (#40826675) Homepage
    Since 1985 the EU patent office keeps a registry where you can deposit plans that could be turned into patents even though the relevant law of 1978 does specifically not recognise computer programs a patentable.
    The 2005 vote in the EU parliament dismissed the idea of software patents with 648 out of 729 votes.
    Besides, the individual member states don't agree so the EU commission does not have much chance to ever enforce these patents.

    Now there is the possibility to patent a specific model of hardware like a phone including the firmware within but it's not easy or anywhere close to the US system.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 31, 2012 @07:49AM (#40826991)

    Impressive ... considering you're claiming the EU had a patent office 8 years before it was formed ... Its impressive that the EU has government bureaucracy that comes before the government even exists.

    You are splitting hairs/names. The European Economic Community (EEC) was formed in 1958 and gradually grew into what we today know as European Union (EU), the change in the organizations name followed the Maastricht Treaty in 1993. The European Patent Organisation is an intergovernmental organisation, including all EEC/EU members, that was set up in 1977.

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