Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Cellphones GUI Handhelds Microsoft Windows Wireless Networking Apple

Wozniak Praises 'Beautiful' Windows Phone 362

Posted by timothy
from the what-does-that-guy-know? dept.
judgecorp writes "Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has praised the user interface of Microsoft's Windows Phone, saying that aspects of its user interface are more 'beautiful' than comparable sides to the iPhone. The comments, in a New Domain, follow on from a comment by Forrester boss George Colony who blogged that Apple would decline in the post-Jobs era. Both pieces have kicked off the kind of online argument you would expect."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Wozniak Praises 'Beautiful' Windows Phone

Comments Filter:
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @10:42AM (#39857119)

    Probably some Anti-Apple shill.

  • And.....? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @10:43AM (#39857127)

    So what if Woz praised something a competitor produced? He's entitled to his own opinion, negative or positive, and it says nothing about the state of Apple. Is Apple going to decline without Jobs? Who know, but Woz having an opinion is hardly a sign one way or the other. The only thing it does is dispell any notion that he's an arrogant prat who couldn't possible even deign to glance at a competitor's product without vomiting.

    Maybe this sort of thing gets to me too much, but I'm really fed up of this "you must be 100% for whichever brand-tribe you join!" guff. If he liked bits of another product then so what, that's competition for you.

    • Re:And.....? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by squiggleslash (241428) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:00AM (#39857345) Homepage Journal

      Well, I'm curious to know Woz's opinion on things. Woz may be associated with Apple, but he's a smart geek who's been in computing since the beginning, and he's not a fanboi of any particular technology despite his Apple connections.

      Would you have written something similar, or considered it non-newsworthy, if the subject was Dave Haynie, Richard Stallman, Chuck Peddle, or James Gosling?

      • Re:And.....? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:17AM (#39857543)

        he's not a fanboi of any particular technology despite his Apple connections.

        Which I think is something which appearss to be missing in large chunks of the general population these days (at least, the population who actually care about technology). If you take a glance down the comments sections of many sites it's a perpetual argument-to-the-death for their own personal preference. I even know people who are like that in person when it comes to tech, but why? Why are people so obsessed with insisting that what they have is the absolute best ever and don't you dare disagree with me? At which point did people stop being consumers and start being believers?

        Would you have written something similar, or considered it non-newsworthy, if the subject was Dave Haynie, Richard Stallman, Chuck Peddle, or James Gosling?

        That depends on the context. Stallman has heavily criticised Apple for their ethics, which is something I'd be interested in hearing about. Would I think it's shocking and newsworthy if Stallman picked up an iPhone and said "You know, I really like the aluminium body they give these things"? No.

        If Wozniak thinks the Microsoft phone is beautiful then fine. If someone wants to report "comments from a guy who knows about these things on #upcomingtech" then fine. But trying to tie that in to an article about someone claiming that Apple is in decline as if the two are somehow linked and therefore Steve must be about to jump ship? Come on.

        • OK, yes, the article lumped the Apple critic and Woz together, and I agree that was dumb.

          Be wary of that personal preference thing. I find myself defending numerous platforms, some I like, some I don't, because people go over the top in its criticism. That, I suspect, is true of many, and I suspect we all end up being labeled fanbois as a result, regardless of whether we're reacting to someone else's absurd assertions or not.

          To make matters worse, certain websites deliberately go out of their way to pi

      • Re:And.....? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by JustSomeProgrammer (1881750) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:23AM (#39857629)
        I honestly can't imagine Richard Stallman saying anything positive about anything Microsoft produces due to him never giving it a shot because of his personal beliefs of how software should be.

        I wonder what kind of phone he actually uses...
        • by Zordak (123132) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @01:37PM (#39859305) Homepage Journal

          I wonder what kind of phone he actually uses...

          Probably one cobbled together from parts he cannibalized from old radios, digital toasters, and Clinton-era computers, running a custom ROM he flashed to the BIOS chip and a barebones customized "GNU/Linux." He has to carry the motherboard and RAID in a hemp backpack (which doubles as his exercise regimen), it has a full QWERTY keyboard that he keeps in a side holster so he can run his EMACS-based SMS client, and the display is a naked LCD running on an ISA framebuffer card, connected by a ribbon cable coming out the side of the monitor. He suspends the monitor from a helmet so he can go "hands free."

          It ain't purdy, but IT IS FREE!

        • Re:And.....? (Score:5, Interesting)

          by dwlovell (815091) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @09:47PM (#39864065)

          Woz has 2 iphones as his primary devices. He says that Windows Phone 7 has a better interface than Android and chooses it over that platform, but he always carries multiple devices with him and still says his two iPhones (ATT and Verizon) are his primaries. Despite this, he praises a lot of aspects of the WP7 OS as better than iOS.

          Here is a link to a audio recording of an interview with Woz where he talks about all his devices and why he likes WP7 over Android:
          http://soundcloud.com/kopoint/the-report-steve-wozniak-interview [soundcloud.com]

          Go to 6:25 to hear him say that iPhone is still his primary.

          BTW, I carry a Lumia 900 for personal bias warning.

      • by chrb (1083577)
        Woz actually visited the Googleplex to pick up his Android phone, posed with the dev team, and thinks Android is great: Woz: I Wish My iPhone Did All The Things My Android Does [dailytech.com]
  • by Chrisq (894406) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @10:45AM (#39857163)
    Its not surprising that Wozniak stuck to tech rather than going into management. He gives his honest opinion, saying what he believes to be true. There is no place for this sort of thing in the boardroom.
    • Its a shame he will more than likely be shunned and skinned alive by the Church of Apple, as they have now found their Lucifer, their angel fallen from grace.
    • by King_TJ (85913) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:01AM (#39857359) Journal

      Just because Woz originally helped found Apple Computer in the 70's doesn't mean he's a shill for Apple 30 years later, long after having worked as one of their employees, and after the company changed names (simply "Apple" today -- with the "Computer" part purposely deleted).

      I really do think the man speaks honestly about technology he uses, no matter which vendor it comes from. He often likes Apple's products, and when he does, he'll tell you so. But the media seems to assume he's "supposed to be saying that" and jumps to conclusions whenever he says something good about a competing product instead.

      As a big fan of the iPhone myself, I'd agree with Woz about Windows Phone 7 too. It *does* have a refreshing and attractive-looking UI to it -- something I'm doubly impressed came out of Microsoft, after their LONG standing belief that everything they designed should have a START button in the corner. (Even their embedded systems for such things as vehicle navigation systems still required developers to purposely code the software to completely hide the OS's UI underneath, because nobody wanted a touchscreen in their car or truck to look like it was just another PC running a version of Windows, with icons to double-click.)

    • While MS and the WinPhone proponents will jump all over this, it's not that big of a deal. Woz is a tech geek, his technical abilities are/were top notch. But I've used the UIs he designed/implemented. Frankly, his opinion on a UI doesn't carry much weight.

      He has also praised things about Android in the past.

      What does all that mean? Simply that the iPhone doesn't get every detail "perfect", other phones do some things better.

      But rather than take my word for it, here are Woz' words (from TFA):

      “The iPhone has a lot of beauty and simplicity, and you don’t get lost as much in it, but it is more awkward to use (than Windows Phone 7.5 Mango).
      ...
      “iPhone is my favourite phone. I did give my opinion that the Windows Phone had superior visual appearance and operation cues that were also more attractive. In my opinion, it sets the mark for user interface. I would recommend it over my Android phones, given that it doesn’t yet have the breadth of apps,...”

    • by crazyjj (2598719) * on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:38AM (#39857815)

      It's sad that Wozniak was always hindered by his inability to be a bullshit artist. It's just not in his nature to kiss ass or blow smoke. You ask his opinion and he gives it, without any regard as to whether or not it's what you want to hear.

      Unfortunately this quality, which should be considered a virtue, is usually considered a handicap in the corporate world.

  • Monumental failure. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by GauteL (29207) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @10:48AM (#39857183)

    The UI may be great and the development environment good, but Microsoft, in a misguided attempt to lock developers to the platform (that only works when you have them to begin with), made it impossible to use c++ and OpenGL on them meaning every part of an Android or iOS game/app has to be rewritten to work on Windows Phone 7.

    When you make it too hard, developers will stick with the platforms where the customers are; Android and iOS

    • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @10:52AM (#39857235)

      Except Microsoft will eventually have tons of developers on the platform, unless you are suggesting that no one is going to pick up development for Windows 8. Once you start making Windows 8 desktop apps, they should be easy to convert to Windows 8 mobile apps.

      • by h4rr4r (612664)

        I sure hope the apps won't be too easy to port. Keyboard and mouse interface do not translate well to touch. Nor does many open windows translate well to only one window open at full screen like on a phone.

        These two environments are so different that trying to move applications over without at least replacing the entire user interface will only end in pain.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by squiggleslash (241428)

      made it impossible to use c++ and OpenGL on them meaning every part of an Android or iOS game/app has to be rewritten to work on Windows Phone 7

      You meant "Java" and "Objective C", right? Because regular apps aren't programmed in C++ on either iOS or Android (although I believe the former supports it for regular apps, it's just most are Objective C anyway given the OPENSTEP API); yes, games on Android usually require a stub written in C++, but again, it's not the recommended way to write an app except for

      • by GauteL (29207) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:53AM (#39858059)

        You meant "Java" and "Objective C", right?

        No. I meant C++. iOS and Android requires a bit of Objective-C and Java respectively, but you can write all your heavy lifting code in C++. For instance, you can write a whole C++ library and reference it in your Objective-C code, through Objective-C++.

        So you can essentially share quite a bit of code between iOS and Android. As an example, OpenSceneGraph (openscenegraph.org) runs on both iOS and Android, and that is a C++ based library. I wish I had specified this in my parent post so I didn't have to clarify this.

        Also, I must admit to genuine confusion (I'm not saying you're wrong here, I'm asking...): If WP7 is .NET based, can't you use a C++ compiler that compiles to the CLR? Or have they prevented that in some way?

        Only Phone Manufacturers [stackoverflow.com] are allowed to write unmanaged code for WP7 so that excludes native c++.

        And even if you can run managed C++ in the CLR, most C++ codebases can not compile this way without major changes.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by squiggleslash (241428)

          No. I meant C++. iOS and Android requires a bit of Objective-C and Java respectively, but you can write all your heavy lifting code in C++. For instance, you can write a whole C++ library and reference it in your Objective-C code, through Objective-C++.

          You can, but you don't. The point here is not that there's some hypothetical apps out there that might be easier to port if there was a C++ compiler for WP7, it's that there are, in practice, very, very, very few, because C++ is not the recommended language

          • by GauteL (29207) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @01:03PM (#39858851)

            You can, but you don't. The point here is not that there's some hypothetical apps out there that might be easier to port if there was a C++ compiler for WP7, it's that there are, in practice, very, very, very few, because C++ is not the recommended language of development for either iOS or Android.

            Look I really wish you would just speak for yourself because you lack the knowledge to speak for the rest of us. As someone who is actually writing a cross platform OpenGL game and knows how possible what I'm saying is, I'd like to ask you how you think all those cross platform blockbuster 3d games and classic game ports came along (I love all the classic point and click adventures)? Do you really think they rewrote everything in Objective C because it's the "recommended way" hen they could just slightly adapt their existing c++ code base and write a small Objective C fronted.

            I sincerely don't think you know what you're talking about when you say "not many", "a small minority", etc unless you only talk about toy apps like third party alarm clocks or "flashlights". It's not like each app says which programming language it was written in and you have provided absolutely no evidence.

      • by shutdown -p now (807394) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @01:31PM (#39859227) Journal

        Also, I must admit to genuine confusion (I'm not saying you're wrong here, I'm asking...): If WP7 is .NET based, can't you use a C++ compiler that compiles to the CLR? Or have they prevented that in some way?

        Like Silverlight in the browser, WP7 only supports the subset of CIL that is verifiable (i.e. memory-safe) for third party apps. While VC++ can compile pretty much any C++ code to managed without changes to the source with /clr, the output is not verifiable (because C++ has things like pointer arithmetic), so it doesn't run on WP7. There is /clr:safe, which produces verifiable code, but it does so by restricting the use of all C++ constructs that cannot be compiled that way - which is most of the language. So it certainly won't help you take an existing C++ codebase and recompile it for WP7.

        You meant "Java" and "Objective C", right? Because regular apps aren't programmed in C++ on either iOS or Android (although I believe the former supports it for regular apps, it's just most are Objective C anyway given the OPENSTEP API); yes, games on Android usually require a stub written in C++, but again, it's not the recommended way to write an app except for extreme circumstances.

        Most Android games, especially 3D ones, are, in fact, written almost entirely in C++, with only a small Java stub to handle input & sound.

        Portable regular apps are often programmed with Obj-C/Java for UI, and C++ on the background. This is because, right now, it's the only way to reuse code between iOS and Android, and both platforms are sufficiently popular that doing so is an explicit goal from the get go. Because WP7 does not support C++, it does not benefit from this arrangement; but if it did support it, then it would (because then porting an app to WP7 would mean only rewriting the UI in C#, not the whole thing).

        In the end, I have to say I don't see what you're saying is a problem. I rather like the fact that Apple, Google, and Microsoft are doing their own thing. It's been a long time since we saw major tech companies implementing different visions of how computers should be - to me, personal computing died with the bankruptcy of Commodore, and we're finally, FINALLY, seeing a break in the idea that all platforms should be the same.

        There is a big difference between platforms being the same, and code being portable between them. There's no good reason why platform-independent code (that does not use any platform-specific APIs) should not be portable.

    • by DrXym (126579) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:39AM (#39857839)
      "Apollo" or Windows Phone 8, Microsoft's next version supposedly allows for native code support if the rumours are to be believed. But that doesn't help developers out there right now. Porting C written to OpenGL ES to C# XNA more or less qualifies as writing from scratch. Perhaps the big boys have the resources to put people to work on a port but I doubt many do.

      With just a little bit of glue and abstraction over input devices a game could probably share 90% of the code between iOS, Android and even the Blackberry Tablet OS / Blackberry 10. If you utilised some 3rd party gaming API it's probably even more again. Microsoft really need that native support and preferably OpenGL ES, even if its through gritted teeth.

  • Buyer beware! (Score:5, Informative)

    by MCSEBear (907831) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @10:50AM (#39857203)
    Since multiple industry journalists have stepped forward saying that current Windows Phones will not be eligible to receive an upgrade to Win Phone 8, it's difficult to think of current models as more than a scam.

    The one Windows Phone evangelist who claimed the current devices would be upgradable, quickly walked those statements back.

    Microsoft developer evangelist Nuno Silva apparently confused applications with devices when he claimed that users of Windows Phone 7 (aka Mango) would be able to upgrade to Windows Phone 8 (aka Apollo).

    Offering a mea culpa on his blog today, Silva said he was trying to echo Microsoft's own statements that existing Windows Phone apps would run under Apollo. But for some reason he gave the impression that current devices themselves would also be able to run the next version of Windows Phone.

    "I mistakenly confused app compatibility with phone updateability, which caused the rumors we saw yesterday," Silva wrote. "I did not intend to give the impression I was offering new guidance on any products under development or their upgradeability."

    The developer aroused hopes among the Windows Phone faithful by leading them to believe that Mango devices would be eligible to receive the Apollo upgrade. But various sources have been insisting for a while that there is no upgrade path.

    Source here [cnet.com] .

    If you buy one of these "beta test" phones, you will soon be stuck in a multi-year contract with a device that will not be upgradable to the current version of the OS. There is nothing beautiful about that. Do not buy before Win Phone 8 is released!

    • He back tracked on his comments, but didn't say it wasn't happening. Microsoft has already demoed Windows 7 running on hardware weaker than current WP7 hardware and demoed full Windows 8 running on WP7 hardware in 2011. I believe all current WP7 phones will get upgraded to WP8. They will probably lack features like iPhone 4 doesn't have all the iOS features than iPhone 4s does, but iPhone 4 does run iOS 5.

      Microsoft had Windows 7 running on a phone weaker than all current WP7 devices in prior to 2010.
    • by MCSEBear (907831)
      As a reminder, this is the same thing Microsoft did when they refused to provide upgrades to Win Phone 7 from devices that ran Windows Mobile 6.5. Even for devices which had the same basic specs at the Win Phone 7 devices.

      Owners of HTC’s highly-praised HD2 touchscreen smartphone will be unable to upgrade the device to Microsoft’s new Windows Phone 7 software when the OS is released towards the end of the year. Despite the HD2 meeting many of the criteria laid down in Microsoft’s ‘C

    • Re:Buyer beware! (Score:4, Informative)

      by Richard_at_work (517087) <richardprice.gmail@com> on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:28AM (#39857687)

      So, basically the same situation as Android then - no idea when, or even if, you will be upgraded? :)

      Seriously, the Galaxy Note is getting a lot of ad time over here in the UK, enough to make me pick it up in a store and take a look at it (i find the form factor to be ... interesting, and I'd consider buying one for that - couldn't make a judgement on the OS as it was a dead display unit), but it struck me that it was still on Android 2.3 and I was sure that both Android 3 and 4 had been released (I know that 3 is tablet only).

      Sure enough, Android 4 has been out since last November - and Samsung have yet to confirm an upgrade date for the Note. Thats just wrong.

      • Re:Buyer beware! (Score:4, Interesting)

        by MCSEBear (907831) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @12:32PM (#39858469)
        Except for the fact that when you buy a flagship Nexus phone, there isn't any doubt at all that you will, at the very least, receive the next version of Android.

        For people who buy Microsoft/Nokia's current flagship phone, the word on the street is that they are going to be screwed over, and Microsoft refuses to address the issue even when the big hitter tech journalists directly ask.

        That's a big difference.
    • I wouldn't read anything into it either way. Microsoft has no control over whether there'll be updates from WP7 to WP8 on existing WP7 phones.

      We have the same problem with Android. Hell, many (most?) Android Honeycomb users (and if there was ever something clearly stamped "BETA! Do not use yet!", it was Honeycomb) are still waiting for an ICS upgrade.

  • no surprise (Score:5, Insightful)

    by smash (1351) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @10:52AM (#39857229) Homepage Journal

    Wozniak is a nerd's nerd. He isn't the general public, and what woz thinks is awesome is not likely to be what Joe average wants to use. That is not meant to be an insult by the way, the man is a genius. But he's a technical genius and not a genius with regards to what people want (that was Jobs).

    I'd say that getting a glowing review by wozniak is just as likely to be the kiss of death as it is to be the harbinger of iphone doom...

  • by mlts (1038732) * on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @10:53AM (#39857241)

    When MS bought out the Chevron utility and built it as an option, it made the platform attractive -- no worrying about rooting or jailbreaking. A recent XDA article showed that that functionality is going away soon.

    I wish it weren't the case, but I am tired of locked down platforms, and find Android the one that sucks the least. For example, if I want to block calls/texts with iOS [1], i'm forced to jailbreak. At least with Android, I can use Mr. Number or a root-level blacklist and be done with it.

    What would be ideal would be a system similar to the one used for unlocking Nexus phone bootloaders -- an obstacle that will make Joe Sixpack go "hmm, maybe I shouldn't do this", but for someone who knows their stuff, would be trivial. That way, people who don't know what they are doing are protected by the phone's security and the gatekeeper at the app store, while people who are more interested in customization can do what they want.

    [1]: Yes, there are apps that supposedly do blocking, but a lot of them do nothing except create a new contact entry with [Blocked] in it.

  • Since 1984... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by sycodon (149926) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @10:53AM (#39857247)

    George Colony who blogged that Apple would decline in the post-Jobs era.

    Since day one of the Macintosh, or you might say day one of the IBM PC, people have been predicting the demise of Apple. With every new model and every new OS, legions of entrenched industry analysts stood up and said with certainty..."whoa, this may be the end of Apple".

    I guess if they just keep saying that, one day it will be true and they can pat themselves on the back for being so prescient.

    • people seem to have forgotten the old days, which may well be back now that Jobs is gone -- " Apple computer, proudly going out of business since 1977 "
    • Re:Since 1984... (Score:4, Insightful)

      by tgd (2822) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:04AM (#39857391)

      George Colony who blogged that Apple would decline in the post-Jobs era.

      Since day one of the Macintosh, or you might say day one of the IBM PC, people have been predicting the demise of Apple. With every new model and every new OS, legions of entrenched industry analysts stood up and said with certainty..."whoa, this may be the end of Apple".

      I guess if they just keep saying that, one day it will be true and they can pat themselves on the back for being so prescient.

      Well, to be fair, the first post-Jobs era at Apple did almost sink the company. Microsoft, ironically enough, is a big part of the reason Apple made it out of the mid 90's in business. And if you talk to their shareholders now, most of them will tell you that, while the post-Jobs era now has been good from a stock value and revenue standpoint, its been pretty damn concerning from a mid-term to long-term innovation and investment standpoint. Look at the pace of "real" innovation that was happening at Apple for the ten years before Jobs' departure, and look at the pace now. That should have people worried. "Innovation" now is "hype up the technology developed by a company we're suing (Samsung's high-resolution panel)" and "we're in 150 markets". Software innovation is dried up -- they're rolling out largely features that came from Android and WP7, implemented in the jailbroken community, and absorbed much later by Apple.

      Apple and MS have swapped roles now -- Apple is coasting on customer hype and its near monopoly, and Microsoft is the nimble innovator. And as someone who has a lot of stock in both, I have this lingering sense of dread that both companies are going to somehow screw this up.

  • by Lucas123 (935744) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:02AM (#39857381) Homepage
    He's not an Apple fanboy. He just likes good technology regardless of who makes it.

    --
    The mill's closed. There's no more work. We're destitute. I've got no option but to sell you all for scientific experiments.
  • by captain_sweatpants (1997280) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:08AM (#39857457)
    It really doesn't matter how good (or not) Windows phone are:

    1. The intersection of MS fanboys and people with widespread credibility is exactly 0.
    2. Nobody (apart from MS employees and shareholders) wants it to succeed. - Most people who care about tech gear want MS products to fail so the company will die and be replaced by several other, better companies.
    3. We all want competition, good products, and good value, but nobody associates any of those things with microsoft. We all reasonably expect competitors products to be at least as good and better value.
    4. We'll happily take an apple/google duopoly over another MS monopoly anyday.

    So unless the phones are both outstanding compared to the competition, and much better value, nobody is going to care about them. This seems unlikely.

    If MS wants people to care about it's brands and products, it needs to split itself up into it's various divisions. Smaller, independent businesses would be forced to compete and innovate instead of relying on marketing and monopoly to ensure success. If WP7 became a genuine underdog, it might actually get some credible supporters. But since this won't ever happen, it will simply die a long, painful and expensive death. So props to MS on the strategy so far.
    • 2. Nobody (apart from MS employees and shareholders) wants it to succeed.

      I want it to succeed. Why? More options = better. If they open it up, I want it to succeed even more.

      I don't like Microsoft, but as long as they are not overwhelmingly dominant, they are no worse than Apple or IBM.

  • by dkleinsc (563838) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @11:36AM (#39857801) Homepage

    This is the kind of online argument I'd expect:
    A: This is a superior product, because XYZ.
    B: But it's inferior because other products have KLM, which is better than XYZ.
    A: Whaddaya mean, XYZ rocks, KLM sucks!
    B: Your product sucks!
    A: Well, yeah ... you're a stinky poopy-face!
    B: I'm not, but yo momma is!
    A: B is totally like Hitler!

  • by kerneloops (2629783) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @12:18PM (#39858333)
    I purchased a Lumia 900 on 4/8. Previous phones include Nokia N900 (still "running" MeeGo...) and HTC G2. So far the Lumia experience has been good. Pros: - Fluid, smooth and intuitive UI - Majority of everyday apps I use are native MS/Nokia, or good quality 3rd party (UC Browser, Nav, Google Voice, social networking, email, music player) - Excellent Nokia Drive navigation, probably best nav app I've used. Very quick GPS lock, nice UI while driving, good voice navigation - Good battery life. 16 hours of moderate/heavy use (not always on LTE though), with still juice left. - For me the home screen tiles work. IMO they are a nice compromise between an icon and widget, obviously this boils down to preference. Then again, if you load up your home screen with tiles, you've effectively made your home screen an app menu, just with super large icons... - Display works well in daylight - VKB is ok. Pretty quick swapping from portrait to landscape mode, but like with any touch keys, nothing beats the real keyboard. Pleased to find my native language as a quick switch option while typing. - LTE speeds so far have been good (7-8 mbps download in West L.A.; good/great 4G-speeds in Miami) - "Multitasking". Obviously nowhere near what the N900 offered, but in my daily use I find it similar to Android. - Last but not least, though this one seems to be an ignored feature of a modern smartphone: fantastic call quality -- mind you this on AT&T's famously shitty network. Cons: - Browser options (for now): IE9 is ok, not great, but I'd like to see Firefox and Opera Mobile as options. UC Browser as an IE9 variant offers some welcomed tweaks. - App menu: minor gripe in my use, but if you load your device with apps, the single file scrolling can become a real nuisance. Not that I found Android's App Drawer with 4-5 pages (or a cube/wheel/cylinder...) that much better. I use the KISS principle, worked on Android, works on WP7. - Battery (no percentage) and time displayed only on main screen, not when in app menu. - Display: while it works well outdoors, the screen res. does show its numbers, especially while browsing. Pixellation is apparent on the browser while zoomed out, after you pinch zoom in the text/font looks ok -- for some reason I'd think this would be the other way around. - Camera: Not bad, but not excellent either. It seems like my N900 takes as good pictures as Lumia 900, though this is subjective as I am not a photo-pro. So, the cam is a minor disappointment. - Integration with Zune. Only reason I've used Zune was to do a firmware upgrade. But, signing up with Microsoft/Apple, you kinda know that this is the shit you have to put up with. - Lack of specific apps. I haven't found an app yet that I couldn't live without -- i.e. I've modified my phone usage, like I had to do with the N900 -- but Android app market makes life much more fun if you have the time and energy to read about, test, and install/uninstall apps. - The non-upgradeability to WP8. This one's going to bring some suckage. Though I have to admit, I wasn't even thinking about it when I bought the Lumia 900 (ok, so I got a refund for the purchase price, thanks Nokia!). So I guess I shouldn't complain after all. And it's not like my 2-yr old G2 was getting any love from HTC/T-Mo (ICS Beta on it, ran like, a beta...). I have no idea how the app devel process varies between WP7, Android and iOS, but from an enduser, albeit not a superuser, experience, IMO Lumia 900 works well. I've dumbed down my device requirements, but so far I'm liking it. When I want to dig into an OS, I'll just continue tweaking my Arch with OpenBox :)
  • by msobkow (48369) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @02:31PM (#39859971) Homepage Journal

    Woz was the hardware guru who created the original Apple computers; Jobs was the marketing guy who got them in people's hands.

    But as a true "geek", Woz has the decency to respect his competition, and no shame in giving them praise when it's due.

    It's a shame so-called "businessmen" couldn't be as generous in their dealings with the competition.

We don't know one millionth of one percent about anything.

Working...