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AT&T To Unlock Out-of-Contract iPhones 146

Posted by timothy
from the with-great-reluctance dept.
NicknamesAreStupid writes "Many outlets are reporting that AT&T will allow owners of iPhones whose contracts have expired to unlock their devices. One might think that a call or a quick trip to their local AT&T store would do the trick, and they do provide this service to people who are currently under contract with a newer phone and want to use their older one. However, AT&T has never made anything free to be easy, and this may not bode well for former customers who offer no profitable revenue. For example, when AT&T bought Bell South, they were ordered by the court as part of the acquisition to offer $10/month 'DSL lite' service. The maze in their website which led to this opportunity is now a story of legend. Will the key to this unlocking the iPhone be as byzantine for former customers?"
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AT&T To Unlock Out-of-Contract iPhones

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  • Seriously? (Score:5, Informative)

    by Xacid (560407) on Saturday April 07, 2012 @09:03PM (#39610091) Journal

    I've just called customer service, gave them the IMEI, they submitted a request to the manufacturer, and I got an unlock code about 3 days later. There wasn't anything painful other than taking the time to just call. Mind you - I did this as a former customer and this was maybe a couple months ago.

    • Re:Seriously? (Score:4, Informative)

      by Mr. X (17716) on Saturday April 07, 2012 @10:12PM (#39610325)
      AT&T has always unlocked non-iPhones, but the news here is they finally are unlocking iPhones.
      • Re:Seriously? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by schnell (163007) <`ten.llenhcs' `ta' `em'> on Saturday April 07, 2012 @10:51PM (#39610465) Homepage

        Yes, AT&T has always unlocked phones except for the iPhone - this was a legacy of their early exclusivity with Apple. Now they unlock iPhones too. It has never been terribly hard from my experience (with two non-iPhones over the past 10 years).

        But remember this is Slashdot. If it the article is about AT&T, Microsoft, Apple or any cableco, the story must be written such that even if the company is doing something good the summary must be negative. I'm guessing there is a step two for Slashdot somewhere and step three is profit.

    • by thegarbz (1787294)

      they submitted a request to the manufacturer, and I got an unlock code about 3 days later

      Erm... Are you trying to tell me AT&T don't have the software to generate the unlock codes for a phone? You know the software that can be bought on the open market for pretty much every phone and memory stick on ever sold? The software that friendly people will use to generate an unlock code in exchange for some $10 on the shadier forums on the internet?

      The biggest telecom provider in America doesn't have the resources of every other telecom company and a handful of hackers?

      I mean my service provider ha

      • Re:Seriously? (Score:4, Informative)

        by quacking duck (607555) on Sunday April 08, 2012 @12:55AM (#39610829)

        All other brand phones are apparently easily unlockable, but officially unlocking an iPhone isn't done with a code.

        It requires a full firmware restore, during which Apple servers are contacted, and confirms that the carrier has updated their records with Apple that your IMEI is now unlocked. If all went well, the Apple server sends the unlock commands to the phone, and when it's done iTunes shows a message confirming you're unlocked.

        I went through this about 12 hours ago when unlocking my old iPhone 3GS. Other than taking a godawful long time, it was pretty seamless--all the previous settings, apps and music were restored automatically.

        • Re:Seriously? (Score:4, Informative)

          by cmdrbuzz (681767) <cmdrbuzz@xerocube.com> on Sunday April 08, 2012 @05:38AM (#39611509)

          It doesn't need a firmware restore on the iPhone. All it needs is the Operator to update Apple's records.

          Once that has been done and you put another SIM-card into the iPhone for a different operator, it will contact Apple's servers and check if the phone is unlocked before allowing that SIM to be used.

          I've done the exact same thing with my 3GS and 4 (with O2 in the UK, but its the same principle)

          • by Lumpy (12016)

            That is really Wrong.

            I had AT&T sim unlock my iphone back in the 3G days.

            you give them your phone info and they give you a code to enter on the keypad that tells the radio modem chipset to flip off the carrier lock bit.

            There is no "contact Apple servers" BS. That is not how cellphones work. even the iphone and android phones use the exact same radio chipset as a cheapie $3.00 flip phone.

            • It's not "really wrong".

              Even this site [gsmliberty.net], which claims to generate unlock codes for most brand phones, if you try generating a code for an iPhone it takes you to dedicated iPhone unlock page, the info button for the "Unlock type" section says 'Your iPhone's IMEI will be registered as "Unlocked" in Apple's database'. Their FAQ on the unlock says it's a "Remote unlock via cable and software". Nowhere does it mention entering an unlock code.

              Perhaps it's changed since the 3G days, either way they never gave me (a

          • It seems you're right [apple.com], a restore wasn't actually needed. The unlock guy at my old carrier just told me to do that.

            OTOH, we were going to update to the latest iOS anyway, and the friend who bought the phone isn't a techy, so just as well we did it while I was still there.

      • by BronsCon (927697)
        Such software for the iPhone does not exist, in any official capacity that would allow AT&T to use it legally, on the open market. Apple holds on to those unlock codes with an iron fist.
        • by Lumpy (12016)

          This is a blatent lie.

          I have and many others have had their iphones unlocked in previous years for international travel. you just need to know what number to call back then. I never called apple, I called AT&T international tech support. they gave me the code after I gave them info and they checked to see if my phone was at least 1 year into contract. He then gave me the code to type into the dialing keypad that unlocked the phone's cellular chipset.

          I know of 7 other people that have done this with

        • by jo_ham (604554)

          Nonsense. The USA is not the world. Non-US carriers have been legally unlocking the iPhone for years. This is just AT&T finally catching up with the rest of the world due to a lot of complaining to Apple HQ by customers who are rightly pissed off that their out of contract (and thus free from subsidy) phone was forever locked to AT&T for no good reason.

          The change came after Apple contacted AT&T about it, so I assume they threatened to offer free unlocks to any customer directly unless AT&T s

          • by BronsCon (927697)

            Nionsense.

            So, you've read the contracts between Apple and AT&T regarding the iPhone? Or you know people directly who have? Or you know people who work for AT&T to procure the handsets they sell and the software tools to support those handsets? I suppose you know people in all tiers of AT&T support and several store employees, including management, personally and not just through store visits?

            On all but the first of those, I can asnwer affirmatively. Apple may or may not have released the tool to other car

            • by jo_ham (604554)

              I answered "nonsense" (with a typo) to this:

              Such software for the iPhone does not exist, in any official capacity that would allow AT&T to use it legally, on the open market.

              Which really is nonsense, given that iPhones can be legally unlocked on hundreds of different carriers. AT&T may not have anything in their official channels, but to claim that the software/method simply is not accessible to them is nonsense.

              Whether the current situation was down to the legacy of the exclusivity agreement with Apple when the first iPhone came along (although this doesn't seem to have affected other formerly-exclusive carriers in other countrie

              • by BronsCon (927697)
                To use it legally, the tool would have to be provided to them by Apple. Their contract specifically states that they must contact Apple for the codes, they were not provided the tool. Therefore, such software for the iPhone does not exist, in any official capacity that would allow AT&T to use it legally, on the open market. Note that this is not the same as stating "Such software for the iPhone does not exist, in any official capacity that would allow any carrier to use it legally, on the open market.".
                • by BronsCon (927697)

                  Whoops, pot meet kettle, I should have read your whole post before replying, and I would have read this gem:

                  AT&T may not have anything in their official channels, but to claim that the software/method simply is not accessible to them is nonsense.

                  Note that I never said they didn't have access to the same methods you and I do. I did, however, state that they don't legally have access to any method other than calling Apple. You do understand what would happen to them if they used the methods you and I currently have access to, contrary to their contract with Apple, right? Let me explain, just in case. Apple would gain a lot of money, AT&T wo

                • by jo_ham (604554)

                  Well, then you followed up with a line about how Apple "holds onto those codes with an iron fist" which is a peculiar statement given that iPhones are being legally unlocked by hundreds of other carriers except AT&T.

                  So they hold onto them with an iron fist... from AT&T only?

                  Just to check my understanding of your posts, you see.

                  • by BronsCon (927697)
                    "These codes" would, indeed, be those assigned to AT&T. I also mentioned that they're in the process of renegotiating their contract with Apple in order to obtain the unlocking tool. It's really easy to (feel like you're) win(ing) an argument if you ignore most of what the other person says, isn't it?
                    • by jo_ham (604554)

                      All I had to go on was your initial two sentence post. You can get all indignant about me "not understanding" the nuances of your argument all you like, but there actually has to *be* some argument there first. Adding it after the fact and then complaining that I simply don't understand what you meant is cheap.

                    • by BronsCon (927697)

                      Except that you're still arguing based entirely on those two sentences, 3 posts later. Had I not provided all of that other information, you would be 100% in the right, here. But, I did.

                      Good day to you, sir.

                    • by jo_ham (604554)

                      That was my point - you were getting angsty with with in your first reply that actually contained the meat of your (well reasoned) argument.

                      It was what you signed off with dismissively.

                      Forgive me for being somewhat facetious in my own replies to that.

    • by tapspace (2368622)

      Phone #?

  • former customers? (Score:5, Informative)

    by YesIAmAScript (886271) on Saturday April 07, 2012 @09:04PM (#39610095)

    Some of us are current customers, just we have had our phone for more than 2 years.

    Anyway, I find this ridiculous. Why does AT&T have to wait until the contract is up before unlocking? I already am under contract with an ETF penalty if I try to stop using their service.

    So unlock it earlier, like Verizon does.

    Hell, stop locking the dang things.

    • Re:former customers? (Score:5, Informative)

      by puto (533470) on Saturday April 07, 2012 @09:26PM (#39610179) Homepage
      I work for ATT and might not agree with some of their policies, the unlocking of the Iphone is a contractual obligation the company has with Apple.
      • Or did you just hear that at work?

        Sorry, what you say just doesn't make sense. Apple wants to sell as many iPhones as possible. It's AT&T who wants to hold onto some form of exclusivity. They are under attack from the cheaper companies like MetroPCS, and so they wanted to make sure you had to go to AT&T to get an iPhone.

        And now that iPhones are available with select regional carriers (http://www.engadget.com/2012/04/05/iphone-4s-to-launch-with-select-regional-carriers-april-20th/) they're starting t

      • by sunfly (1248694)

        That does not pass the sniff test.

        I am sure Apple would love all iPhones unlocked, eliminating the primary reason for jailbreaking. It would also keep old devices in service, giving Apple more "credit cards on file", and active on the iTunes store. In fact I could see Apple requiring unlocking to keep selling iPhones.

        Locking the devices makes it more difficult for the very popular iPhone to work on competitors networks.

        I have no insider knowledge, but locking iPhones only benefits AT&T.

        • by Lumpy (12016)

          If apple wanted that one Ios update later to disable any carrier lock ability and a letter to AT&T's CEO with a "suck it, we just unlocked all iphones world wide and will never lock another iphone again. We are also starting a big advert spread that will make you look like a total scumbag if you do anything but say "thank you for doing this"

          Enjoy that turn in your morning cheerios, we have another one ready about you BS with data caps but will give you 90 days to fix it yourself.

          That would rock. Lik

          • by thegarbz (1787294)

            Apple wold win the world overnight and

            then likely cease to exist after then ensuring lawsuits pummels them out of the mobile phone industry.

    • It is Apple that enforces the unlocking prohibitions not the carrier.

    • by Tharsman (1364603)

      There is at least one sensible reason (even if it does not outnumber the reasons for them to just unlock)

      There are quite a few people out there that don't care that much for their credit history. They will gladly go there, get a phone under contract, then stop paying, have their service canceled and never pay the penalty fee, just walking with their now unlocked phone to some other GSM carrier.

      There are also cases with foreigners and identity theft during the small background check they do to see if they c

  • Telus (Score:4, Insightful)

    by EmperorOfCanada (1332175) on Saturday April 07, 2012 @09:05PM (#39610099)
    I wish Telus in Canada would do the same thing. This whole unlocking thing should be mandated as soon as the contract paying for the phone is done.
    • by NoKaOi (1415755)

      This whole unlocking thing should be mandated as soon as the contract paying for the phone is signed.

      FTFY. If I want to travel to Europe and drop in a prepaid SIM card while I travel, or if I want to switch phones and sell mine to somebody on another provider, what business is it of theirs? I'm already either paying the same amount monthly, or paying an early termination fee.

    • by Telvin_3d (855514)

      Telus does. My father just took a trip to Europe and had Telus unlock his phone first so that he could get a SIM card to use over there. No problem.

    • by Ihmhi (1206036)

      They shouldn't be locked in the first place, like in Europe.

      • If you "buy" an iPhone via a carrier it is locked in europe as well.

        But of you look at the price, it makes more sense (for me at least) to by the phone from apple and just insert an arbitrary SIM (the phone from Apple is obviously not locked).

    • by thegarbz (1787294)

      This whole unlocking thing should be mandated as soon as the contract paying for the phone is done.

      Why wait? I mean in my country the phones only come locked in a very limited set of circumstances and can often be unlocked for a small fee.

      I'm in contract with my mobile phone company. If I use my phone with them I pay the phone + my monthly plan. If I don't use my phone I pay the phone + my monthly plan. While I was overseas for 2 months using my phone with another service provider on a pre-paid sim card, I still paid the phone + my monthly plan. Whatever I do with my phone these guys extract $43 out of m

      • by Fuzion (261632)

        This whole unlocking thing should be mandated as soon as the contract paying for the phone is done.

        Why wait? I mean in my country the phones only come locked in a very limited set of circumstances and can often be unlocked for a small fee.

        I'm in contract with my mobile phone company. If I use my phone with them I pay the phone + my monthly plan. If I don't use my phone I pay the phone + my monthly plan. While I was overseas for 2 months using my phone with another service provider on a pre-paid sim card, I still paid the phone + my monthly plan. Whatever I do with my phone these guys extract $43 out of me every month.

        Where's the incentive to lock?

        The incentive is that when you're overseas for 2 months, if you're not unlocked, you'd have to pay roaming charges to your current mobile company to use your phone. Otherwise you'd have to get another phone. Once they unlock it they no longer have that revenue stream. I'm not saying it's right, but I'm just saying that's their incentive.

        • by thegarbz (1787294)

          Does any non-business customer every actually pay roaming fees? Serious question. I travel a lot, and so do friends. We've had people overseas with us plenty of times and I've never seen someone with a personal phone actually roam in another country. Given the choice between roaming and not using a phone at all I'd go with the latter due to the simply insane cost.

          For the cost of about 15minutes of conversation or 4MB, yes that's FOUR MEGABYTE of data, you can buy a feature phone in another country, and that

          • by delt0r (999393)
            Well i have prepay, and i do a lot of roaming in the EU. I pay 50c per min for active talk and 20c for passive. Txt is 13c. Its cheaper than a lot of contracts. Outside the EU it gets pretty expensive, and then just getting a local prepay card is cheaper. However data roaming is still insane even in the EU.
          • Yes, quite often...I get many calls a week about international roaming. About half are putting an international feature on their phone, the other half are arguing that they "never used their phone" when they get their bill with international charges. In my whole two years I've only once seen a system error that charged someone...all their calls where in the US, except one that came from the middle of Mexico - but he had made a call from the US just minutes before and afterwards...so I removed the charges
    • You're the one who bought a phone they say explicitly that they "can't" unlock. Everything else they sell, they will happily unlock for you, for a small fee (that's usually greater than just going to gsmliberty.net or a similar site and buying an unlock code).

      Don't bitch about it, when you have a choice with Telus to buy something that they *will* unlock.

  • by RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) <taiki AT cox DOT net> on Saturday April 07, 2012 @09:06PM (#39610105)

    I have a 3GS sitting in a shelf from 2010. Am I eligible for unlocking on this phone?

    I'm going to guess no. :(

    • by Patent Lover (779809) on Saturday April 07, 2012 @09:20PM (#39610159)
      google "jailbreak oldass iphone"
      • by Myria (562655)

        google "jailbreak oldass iphone"

        There is no unlock exploit for the iPhone 3 GS on any recent firmware. (At least, there isn't one that doesn't involve permanently losing GPS functionality.)

      • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday April 07, 2012 @09:59PM (#39610271)

        Jailbreak != Unlocking

        Jailbreaking is gaining root-level permissions on your phone.
        Unlocking is removing the carrier restriction on the phone, e.g. allowing your ATT branded phone to be used on Verison's network.

        • by Analog Penguin (550933) on Saturday April 07, 2012 @11:26PM (#39610565)

          Except that you can't use a pre-4S AT&T iPhone on Verizon, because Verizon's network is CDMA and all iPhones before the 4S (besides the Verizon 4) were GSM-only. And Verizon won't activate a phone that they didn't sell. The only option for an unlocked GSM iPhone in the US is T-Mobile, and even then you're limited to EDGE speeds because of their weird-ass frequencies.

          • [...] and even then you're limited to EDGE speeds because of their weird-ass frequencies.

            Depends.

            Because of the failed buyout, I guess T-Mo got some frequencies that work with the older iPhone. So, depending on where you are, you may be able to get a 3G signal on T-Mo. But it depends on where you are, etc.

            Besides, who cares about 3G? My iPhone 4S has the 4 Gees and the Wi Fis! (Yes, I know it's bullshit)

          • by DarkVader (121278)

            http://www.verizonwireless.com/b2c/estore/certifieddevice/cd [verizonwireless.com]

            They claim they'll activate phones they didn't sell now.

            But yes, the 4S is the first iPhone sold in any other way than as a VZW phone that can work on their network.

            I believe there are a few regional GSM carriers, and some MVNOs that you can use an unlocked GSM iPhone on.

        • by Phil06 (877749)
          You lose GPS if you unlock, search: iphone unlock gps baseband 06.15.00
          • by Phroggy (441) <slashdot3NO@SPAMphroggy.com> on Sunday April 08, 2012 @02:08AM (#39611033) Homepage

            You lose GPS if you unlock, search: iphone unlock gps baseband 06.15.00

            I'm pretty sure AT&T's official unlocking method won't involve replacing the firmware to trick your iPhone into thinking it's an iPad.

            • It actually involves us submitting a ticket to Apple, because Apple won't actually give us access to the IMIE unlock database...same case with many Nokia phones, when I go to get the code it shows "eligible" but the code is "not found", so I have to submit a case for us to request the codes.
          • by teh*fink (618609)

            FWIW, I jailbroke and unlocked my paid off and out of contract AT&T 3GS iPhone, and use it in the EU with basic drop-in SIM "pay as you go" carriers. My still GPS works fine.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          AT&T's GSM network != Verizon's CDMA network. Not all phones have both GSM/CDMA capabilities.

          How about "Unlocking removes the carrier restriction, allowing you to use the phone on other carriers' networks utilizing the same technology".

    • It won't cost you anything to call them and ask anyways (well, unless your phone plan REALLY sucks!).
    • by yuhong (1378501)

      Yes it is possible, in fact:
      http://www.cultofmac.com/154873/tim-cook-forces-att-to-unlock-customers-phone/ [cultofmac.com]
      Notice the phone involved.

    • AT&T says they'll unlock iPhones that are no longer under contract, to customers who are in good standing. Yes, your iPhone is either out of contract, or you may have upgraded to a newer iPhone. Either way, the 3GS is most likely eligible to unlock

      • AT&T says they'll unlock iPhones that are no longer under contract, to customers who are in good standing. Yes, your iPhone is either out of contract, or you may have upgraded to a newer iPhone. Either way, the 3GS is most likely eligible to unlock

        If you don't owe them anything, your account is in good standing, regardless of whether you're still paying them a monthly tithe.

    • by jcr (53032)

      >I have a 3GS sitting in a shelf from 2010. Am I eligible for unlocking on this phone?

      Yes. The contract term on that 3Gs has expired.

      -jcr

    • I work for AT&T as a CSR, this was in our team meeting last Friday...yes, it is potentially eligible. It has to meet the following criteria: 1. Completed a two year contract OR be able to prove it was purchased at non-commitment pricing. If you bought it from us at the no-commitment pricing, then we usually have the records so you don't have to prove it...you only need to prove it if you bought it from a 3rd party. 2. Not on an line that has had the phone listed as stolen, as in the original custome
    • by Espectr0 (577637)

      ATT's article said "any iphone with a completed contract" so it should work. It even works for on-contract phones where you have payed the ETF.

  • by whoever57 (658626) on Saturday April 07, 2012 @09:47PM (#39610239) Journal
    T-Mobile will unlock a phone 40 days after it was bought, no need to wait 2 years for the end of the contract.
    • by Nimey (114278)

      How much do they charge?

      • by whoever57 (658626)

        How much do they charge?

        Nothing.

        • by Nimey (114278)

          I must be misunderstanding something, then.

          1) T-M subscriber enters standard 2-year contract, gets standard subsidized phone at a discount which assumes the carrier gets their money back from extra fees over two years.

          2) Subscriber gets phone unlocked after 40 days, for no charge.

          Since you're locked in for the remainder of your two-year contract unless you presumably pay a hefty early-termination fee, I don't necessarily see the advantage of unlocking the phone before the contract's up.

          • by voidptr (609)

            If you travel internationally a lot, it's sometimes cheaper to swap in a foreign prepaid sim while out of the country than pay a US carrier for roaming.

    • by Maow (620678)

      T-Mobile will unlock a phone 40 days after it was bought, no need to wait 2 years for the end of the contract.

      Wind Mobile Canada (also using AWS bands) does this too, but after 3 months.

  • What would the telcos have to gain by not letting out-of-contract customers unlock their phones?

    It would seem pointless to needlessly piss off your customers, especially when the phone in question is hopelessly obsolete in any case.

    But then expecting big business (and the dickish, mediocre MBA types who run them) to see beyond the end of their noses -- and actually do something to not antagonise their paying customers -- is probably also a big ask.

  • by nurb432 (527695) on Saturday April 07, 2012 @09:52PM (#39610255) Homepage Journal

    I have a contract on a new phone, but id still like to unlock my old phone, 'just because its mine' ( and the subsidy has long since been paid off ). Wonder if they will do it. ( 3GS )

    • From the AT&T announcement:

      The only requirements are that a customer's account must be in good standing, their device cannot be associated with a current and active term commitment on an AT&T customer account, and they need to have fulfilled their contract term, upgraded under one of our upgrade policies or paid an early termination fee.

      I have an ancient 3G recently superseded by a 4S - I want it unlocked on general principles, and will ask them to do it sometime soon.

  • by Bieeanda (961632) on Saturday April 07, 2012 @10:15PM (#39610337)
    Tsk. I was expecting something at least as maddening as spending an hour trying to cancel an AOL account, or involving disused lavatories filled with leopards.
    • In fact, AT&T's website is always labyrinthine, especially if you have cell, land line, and DSL. This stuff is par for the course with them.
    • I was expecting something at least as maddening as spending an hour trying to cancel an AOL account, or involving disused lavatories filled with leopards.

      Taxes are due in 8 days. You still have a shot at getting your wish.

    • But...but...you had to click a link! And enter your phone number A SEEEECOND TIIIIIME!

      /me rattles heavy chains menacingly!

      /me shakes chains some more.

      /me feebly quivers them a bit.

      Okay, I admit it; Slashdot "Stories of Legend" aren't quite what they used to be.

  • The maze in their website which led to this opportunity is now a story of legend. Will the key to this unlocking the iPhone be as byzantine for former customers?

    Is it just me being a burnout, or do these two sentences, when viewed without context, sound like they could have been written by a computer rather than a person?

  • New laws.. (Score:4, Informative)

    by JavaBear (9872) on Sunday April 08, 2012 @12:38AM (#39610785)

    In some countries there are laws prohibiting the provider from maintaining a perpetual lock.

    The idea in Denmark for instance is that they can at most maintain a sim lock for the initial minimum contract period, which can not exceed 6 months for regular cell phones, and I think 1 year for the more expensive smart phones, and then only if you buy them at the providers' discount, after this they have to provide the unlock codes and assist the user in performing the unlock, free of charge.

    Some providers here don't even lock the phones any longer, you are after all still legally obligated to maintain and pay for your initial contract period.

  • by Ark42 (522144) <slashdot@@@morpheussoftware...net> on Sunday April 08, 2012 @12:49AM (#39610815) Homepage

    So can I get somebody's old unlocked iPhone and put my SIM card in it, without being forced to buy a data plan yet? Wifi-only would be just fine, and I see no reason to pay exorbitant fees for tiny amounts of bandwidth on 3G or 4G data.

    • Re:Data Plan (Score:4, Informative)

      by jonwil (467024) on Sunday April 08, 2012 @03:12AM (#39611161)

      No, AT&T will still detect that you have a "smartphone" (whatever their definition of that happens to be) and force you to buy a data plan.

      • by gl4ss (559668)

        if you don't set up the access points then they should have no way of knowing.

        anyhow, americans should really lobby for against those auto-detections. the operator shouldn't be keeping a db about what kind of device you're using.. just about the radio services you're using, the data you're transferring.

    • No, because our system detects the IMIE is a smartphone, and automatically adds the plan. In fact, I get alot of calls where someone's kid put their SIM in a friends smartphone just to test their card (or whatever reason), and then the parents call because their bill went up by $30...luckily we can check to see what phone is currently being used and see exactly how long that IMIE was used with that SIM...I often have to remove data plans and charges, using the "feature not compatible with device" reason.
      • by Ark42 (522144)

        How is this even legal, if I'm not under any current contract with AT&T?

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