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Apple-Approved Fair Labor Inspections Begin At Foxconn 334

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the five-minute-tea-break-required-between-beatings dept.
redletterdave writes "Apple announced on Monday that the Fair Labor Association has begun inspecting Foxconn's Chinese factories, upon Apple's request. Apple said that Auret van Heerden, the president of the FLA, is leading a group of labor rights experts in the first round of inspections at the sprawling plant in Shenzhen, China, more informally known as 'Foxconn City.' The FLA's independent assessment — completely supplementary to Apple's own auditing practices — will involve interviewing thousands of Foxconn employees about the working and living conditions, including working hours, compensation, managerial issues, and health and safety conditions. Foxconn has 'pledged full cooperation with the FLA,' and will reportedly allow unrestricted access to all of their operations. The investigative team will report their findings in early March on the FLA's website. Apple's other suppliers, including Quanta and Pegatron, will be inspected later this spring. By the time summer rolls around, the FLA hopes to have covered 90 percent of facilities where Apple products are built and assembled."
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Apple-Approved Fair Labor Inspections Begin At Foxconn

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  • by noh8rz2 (2538714) on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @01:05AM (#39029089)
    this is another area in which apple is leading all electronics companies in corporate responsibilities. All electronics are made in asian factories, but apple is the only company with balls to open the doors to visitors. Let's see the same for whatever droid / tab factories.
    • by spyder-implee (864295) on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @01:11AM (#39029131)
      If apple is a leader in worker exploitation (and I'm not saying they are), they should also lead in cleaning it up. At any rate, which ever way the fanboys or haters spin this, I'm just stoked & hopeful that it will raise the quality of working conditions for the employees at Foxconn.
      • There have been too many of debates in Slashdot and in many other places regarding the sweatshop and shitty working conditions in China.

        Most of the debates concentrate on China, and it's communist (some would even use words like "tyrannical to describe the) regime that controls China.

        But why China?

        Why China becomes the world's factory?

        Why so many factories are in China?

        Is it because China is / was poor?

        If so, Africa was / is also poor.

        India too.

        Why don't we see similar factories sprung up in the African con

        • Re:Why China ? (Score:5, Insightful)

          by jamstar7 (694492) on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @05:47AM (#39030481)
          China is relatively stableat this point in time. Africa has been suffering brushfire wars and tribal rebellions for over a century now. It hasn't stopped, as tribe after tribe goes after their neighbors for injuries done generations ago. Ther's not a spot on the African continent that's been war-free for 25 years, not even South Africa.
    • by EdIII (1114411) on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @01:24AM (#39029229)

      You're not *that* naive are you?

      Maybe you have not been to a Chinese factory (I have), bu if you have you would know that this is just lip service. Apple is not opening the company doors either. All they did was hire a 3rd party to investigate. Foxconn agreed. That's it.

      Do you really think with all the media attention that Foxconn would say no? Of course not. They can't.

      However, they are Chinese. Trust me. The word is going around right now that they better look like some cheerful happy mother fuckers in front of the western investigators or there will be some real consequences. Not the standard ones, but some serious ones.

      Way too much on the line. Way too much. How many officials must be involved in greasing up that company's operations who knows.

      Corporate responsibilities? *snicker*

      You are just *too* cute. I wish I could go back in time where all this experience I have did not result in the cynicism I have developed.

      There are no responsible corporations. Just corporations doing the minimum to not get caught, and corporations that have not been caught yet.

      Every single device out there, regardless of which fanboi club it caters to, is made by manufacturing that is related to an awful lot of human misery. Unless you can say with 100% certainty that it is made in a developed Western country like the US, or some place in the EU, you can rest assured there was poor pay and poor working conditions. That's just life.

      It's not limited to devices either. Just about every product made in China is in factories with poor working conditions compared to the US and the EU. It would have to be. Otherwise it would be too expensive and it would just be made in some hell hole in another country.

      Sorry to ruin the illusion for you, but it's all pain and misery, all the way down.

      • by noh8rz2 (2538714)
        unhappy workers? iPhone factory girl proves you wrong. That's a 1000watt smile that can't lie. http://www.2dayblog.com/images/2008/august/iphone_factory_girl_1.jpg [2dayblog.com]
        • Yeah, I have also thought that foxconn workers, if you look at their faces, look really happy in the pictures. That one definitely shows it, though.
        • by Sneeka2 (782894)

          First day on the job maybe? Give her a week... :)

          Seriously though, the GP is a little too pessimistic I'd say. From a western viewpoint, working conditions in China must be horrendous. The locals there may not think much of it, or at least not as much as westerners do. People get used to surprisingly pretty much any condition, and can become more or less happy in their surroundings. At least they do clean work, they get their meals, they're not cold and they get paid, which is more than you can say about mo

          • by mrxak (727974) on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @02:58AM (#39029737)

            These workers know their jobs suck, and they would gladly trade places with any western factory worker with their massive pay, massive pension, tons of benefits, and far higher standard of living.

            Of course, that same western factory worker's pay, benefits, and conditions is why it's so expensive to make anything here. Western standard of living and OSHA is why all the jobs are going overseas, because nobody here is willing to take a pay cut to keep their job.

            But the Chinese workers in these factories know something that some people here seem to forget, and that's a job is better than no job. These Chinese workers are working long hours in tough conditions because they are making pretty good money compared to their other options. They're working hard and making enough money to give their children a better life, so that their children, and their children's children, can rise up, get a good education, get better jobs, and live the Chinese Dream. When Foxconn expands their factories, they have more people lining up to get a job than people here line up to buy the latest iPad. It's not because they've been tricked, it's because poverty in China sucks a lot worse than factory conditions. They simply have no better options.

            We in the west should be glad Chinese workers are making pennies a day to produce our products, because as unemployment falls in China, Chinese living standards and working conditions will improve, just as the industrial revolution in western countries created the middle class, and created a living standard that's the envy of everyone in China. Someday, China will be losing jobs to other countries, because their pay, benefits, and conditions have improved to our standards, and they need to make all of their goods cheaply someplace else. It will not be because of magic, it will be because western tech companies created millions of jobs for Foxconn workers to do.

            • by Sneeka2 (782894)

              Very much indeed. +5 Insightful if I could.

              Continuing along this line of thought, a lot of our current infrastructure is really highly dependent on not-yet-quite-so-developed countries such as China and their political and social system. After "we" have "exploited" all those countries to make cheep stuff for us, where are we going to build anything? Computers may become an unaffordable luxury good. Our societies will have to change in response to those countries developing a middle class.

              • by mrxak (727974)

                There will always be specialization occurring somewhere. Perhaps a country will heavily subsidize computer manufacturing, or have sufficient cheap energy to give them an advantage. Perhaps somebody will develop a robot that requires minimal maintenance, can work 24/7 without complaining, and produce computer parts cheaper than any human labor force.

                My theory is and always will be, if a robot can do your job better and cheaper, you're in the wrong line of work. Much of these factory jobs we lament losing in

                • by Sneeka2 (782894)

                  If that ever proves to be true, great. I'll be skeptical until I see it. Yes, Star Trek replicators are always the dream of mankind, but at this point in time there are more hands building stuff than ever before in human history. Let's see if we can ever obsolete the manual labor part entirely. So far we've only been successful in shifting it around, not in eliminating it. You'll always need somebody that builds the thing that builds the thing.

              • Continuing along this line of thought, a lot of our current infrastructure is really highly dependent on not-yet-quite-so-developed countries such as China and their political and social system.

                You are more right than you can ever imagine !!

                It was the Chinese who built America's first transcontinental railroad

            • by rtb61 (674572)

              So the question is then, would they have a better standard of living if they revolted an executed the current pack of leaders and executives.

              The reality is conditions are so bad because labour is cheaper and more disposable than automation.

              Peoples long term health, their ability to use their hand is bring ground away in some of the worst imaginable repetitious task 10 to 12 hours a days a week.

              Conditions never improve, corporations just shift elsewhere and shut down the existing factories (after smug

              • by Taco Cowboy (5327)

                So the question is then, would they have a better standard of living if they revolted an executed the current pack of leaders and executives.

                If the Americans revolted and execute the current pack of leaders on Capital Hill, would they have a better standard of living ?

              • by u38cg (607297) <calum@callingthetune.co.uk> on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @05:46AM (#39030473) Homepage

                would they have a better standard of living if they revolted an executed the current pack of leaders and executives.

                They tried that. Twenty million died, which is pretty typical for violent socialist revolution. I don't think risking it happening again is that brilliant an idea.

                Name the exploited labour market countries that have risen to first world status, zero.

                The UK. The US. France. Germany.

            • by AmiMoJo (196126) <mojoNO@SPAMworld3.net> on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @08:50AM (#39031297) Homepage

              Of course, that same western factory worker's pay, benefits, and conditions is why it's so expensive to make anything here. Western standard of living and OSHA is why all the jobs are going overseas, because nobody here is willing to take a pay cut to keep their job.

              It isn't that simple. Labour isn't usually the largest cost, or even a hugely significant one in some factories. Even where it is an issue the extra cost involved in producing a high value item like a powerful smartphone or tablet isn't going to force prices up or make a massive dent in profits. You also have to consider the extra shipping costs, one of the major reasons that large and heavy things like cars tend to be made on the continent they are sold on. Corporations are basically just greedy.

              Germany actually manufacturers and exports more than China does. Germany is not a cheap low-wage country. Their products are sometimes a bit more expensive than Chinese ones, but also tend to be better quality. We lost out by engaging in a race to the bottom, lowest possible price combined with lowest possible quality. Well, that and pure greed.

              Having said that there is one area that China seems to excel at which is low volume manufacturing. I can get 50 of my products made by hand for a reasonable price there, but western companies don't even seem to be interested. That is changing slowly, mainly due to automation, but low volume seems to be about the one area where wages really do make a big difference. Hardly applies to consumer electronics though. I'd also like to say that not all Chinese stuff is crap either, they make some damn fine products too. They are not idiots, they see that quality at a reasonable price sells and are getting into that market.

            • by Uberbah (647458) on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @10:25AM (#39032167)

              Of course, that same western factory worker's pay, benefits, and conditions is why it's so expensive to make anything here. Western standard of living and OSHA is why all the jobs are going overseas, because nobody here is willing to take a pay cut to keep their job.

              Germany puts the lie to that corporatist bullshit:

              How Germany Builds Twice as Many Cars as the U.S. While Paying Its Workers Twice as Much

              In 2010, Germany produced more than 5.5 million automobiles; the U.S produced 2.7 million. At the same time, the average auto worker in Germany made $67.14 per hour in salary in benefits; the average one in the U.S. made $33.77 per hour. Yet Germanyâ(TM)s big three car companiesâ"BMW, Daimler (Mercedes-Benz), and Volkswagenâ"are very profitable.

              And that's not from some dirty fucking hippie rag like Mother Jones, that's from Forbes. [forbes.com]

              The problem isn't that American workers aren't competitive, the problem is executive greed.

              But we all knew that already. Cheap shipping, cheap third world labor and international communications were all available in the 50's, 60's, and 70's. But we didn't see the gutting of America's manufacturing base until unions were busted, marginal tax rates (91% under Eisenhower) were slashed to less than 30%, and corporatist "free trade" laws were passed that puts Americans in competition with third world labor without giving Americans third world price tags on goods, housing or services.

              • by ArsonSmith (13997)

                Everyone likes to tout the 90% tax on salaries over $1million back in the 50s. Of course almost nobody then or even now have/has salaries in that range as they were payed with under valued stock options of which when cashed in were only charged 14% at the time or 10% now.

      • Ambrose Bierce said it best: "Corporation, n. An ingenious device for obtaining individual profit without individual responsibility."
      • Maybe you have not been to a Chinese factory (I have), bu if you have you would know that this is just lip service.

        You know, instead of trying to prove how much 'better' and 'righter' you are because of this, why don't you tell us what you saw there? A first hand witness account would be really interesting, and informative, whereas what you have now is trying to bash people with your 'superiority.' Wonderful. Do something better for a change.

        • by EdIII (1114411)

          You are such a holier than though butthead you know? Every post you are so abusive and abrasive and contribute nothing to the proceedings except nastiness.

          Maybe I don't want to talk about what I saw? You think of that? Maybe I don't have anything to do with that business at this point precisely because of what I saw. Foxconn workers have it good compared to what I saw. I would be surprised if the people I saw were still healthy and alive today.

          What would a first hand account tell you anymore than what y

          • You are such a holier than though butthead you know? Every post you are so abusive and abrasive and contribute nothing to the proceedings except nastiness.

            But maybe I'm right.

            What would a first hand account tell you anymore than what you already know? Every one knows conditions are hell in most factories in China.

            I would be really interested in hearing your first-hand account, assuming you've actually been to China. Your extreme defensiveness leads me to believe you might be making stuff up. Do you speak Chinese? Here's a guy who actually did tell his account of factories in China [slashdot.org]. His story is a lot more convincing than yours, and it matches my own experience living in a developing country, where people wanted factories to be built near them because it would be an improvement in their lives.

            Ma

            • by EdIII (1114411)

              You're not right. You're just a fucking asshole. In every post.

              Assuming I have been to China? You're being an asshole again right there for calling me a liar instead of addressing the points I made. Easier to just discredit me than to make logical civil arguments.

              I'm not being defensive. Merely offended by your constant attitude in your posts to me that are not deserving based on anything I have said.

              You're just a truly offensive person with nothing positive to say about anything. You remind of some o

      • Maybe you have not been to a Chinese factory (I have)

        Same here

        But you have, maybe unintentionally, missed a very important point --->

        Not all factories are the same, whether they are in China, or outside of China

        Some factories in China are total shit, I know. But there are factories in China which are actually nicer to work in than some factories that I've been, from United States of America !!

        But then, I guess it's not kosher (aka Politically Correct) to talk about nice Chinese factories in Slashdot

    • but apple is the only company with balls to open the doors to visitors. Let's see the same for whatever droid / tab factories.

      Normally you dont laud a company for having to deal with the kind of issues Foxconn / Apple are. Its great that theyre working on fixing them, but dont turn this issue into something that they did right to begin with.

      I havent heard stories of motorola employees jumping out of the factory due to unlivable conditions, so I think android gets a little more credit here (which is a stupid comparison anyways, since there are many android manufacturers, and the comparison isnt iOS vs Android but Apple vs the othe

  • This is probably the next best option as long as these workers are not allowed to unionize and negotiate their labor terms.

    • by bloodhawk (813939)
      call me a pessimist but I don't see how this changes the current situation at all. Apple has been performing inspections of them and finding breaches every single year, They then issue a warning to the company who then promise to do better in future and they both continue on their merry way raking in profit. As long as Companies like Apple (and yes I know it is not just apple) continue to give human rights nothing more than lip service and publicity stunts nothing will change.
      • by quax (19371)

        Your pessimism is warranted. Here's what I am hoping for:

        This may allow for some breathing space for some actual labor organization to happen. While they are under scrutiny violent suppression of such effort will be more difficult.

    • by nhtshot (198470)

      My wife just showed up with lunch and I asked her specifically about this. (she's native born Chinese) Basically, she said that people work there because they can make more money than they can anywhere else.

      In theory they could unionize, but what would it get them? Most likely a chance to get fired and replaced with 200,000 other farm kids that are quite happy to take the wages Foxconn is willing to offer.

      Unions only work when there is a limited supply of workers. That isn't a problem right now in China. Ev

  • by icebike (68054) * on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @01:20AM (#39029203)

    First time in forever the crowds outside the Apple store weren't dueling down their shirts over new hardware and Apple runs right out and finds company to shill for it. Amazing.

    FLA is essentially the fox watching the hen house if you ask me. The organization is not particularly well though of, being considered by some merely an attention diversion. Even Wiki didn't have much good to say [wikipedia.org] about it. And Non Profit Watch is more than a little skeptical [slashdot.org].

    The take away is that Apple is very sensitive to bad public image press, especially if it makes it into the New York Times, and bodies are hitting the ground.

    But in the background they keep suing android vendors for using hyperlinks on web pages. Because that won't get any one standing outside their windows with placards, and they can lean on the press not to cover it, because its boring technical stuff.

  • A facade really (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @01:24AM (#39029219)

    The metrics of these audits will probably be carefully tailored. Make no mistake, this is not a true audit, it's a carefully choreographed public relations stunt in response to protests to save face.

    • by SuperKendall (25149) on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @02:07AM (#39029435)

      We know Apple has taken some real steps, like bonuses for the FoxConn workers, that lead to the conclusion this is not wholly a sham. So why assume the whole thing is fake, and even if so shouldn't you be attacking companies with equal gusto that can't even be bothered to pretend to inspect anything?

      You can disbelieve all you like, but when you are covering for companies doing nothing you come off as more than a bit hypocritical.

    • by rmstar (114746)

      What, +5 insightful? Who the hell is getting the mod points these days?

      The metrics of these audits will probably be carefully tailored. Make no mistake, this is not a true audit, it's a carefully choreographed public relations stunt in response to protests to save face.

      This is an entirely baseless claim, originating in a black and white (well, mostly black) view of the world that is plain stupid in its absoluteness. This is not insightful, but a defeatist, pathologically negative attitude.

      The audit will pro

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @01:25AM (#39029231)
    The workers feel it is a setup and if they respond negatively they will lose their job. Workers who do respond negatively usually do so to benefit their own agenda. The only part about it that 'works' is the consumer purchasing products with a 'clear conscience.'
  • by bogaboga (793279) on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @01:33AM (#39029275)

    Just last month, it was news about its best ever quarter.

    Then just today, news of its stock hitting north of $500.

    Again today, some site reporting that Apple's iPad3 will hit us in March.

    When Apple finally fades, these pundits will be the ones saying something to the effect: -

    ..."They could not sustain that 'explosive' growth", or

    ..."We knew Android was a force to be reckoned with" or

    ..."With the demise of Steve Jobs Apple then lacked a visionary"...and so much other nonsense...

    I say this because Apple has had a number of failed [oobject.com] products [maindevice.com] in the past.

    I am just tired of all news Apple. Am I alone?

    • by rsborg (111459)

      I am just tired of all news Apple. Am I alone?

      No you're not. You're not even in the minority. There have always been Apple doom-n-gloomers since, well, the beginning of the interwebs. Many respectable trolls^Wtech journalists (Henry Blodgett, John C. Dvorak, have been negative on Apple for decades. What's news now, is that Apple, long the doomed company, is now ascendant, and has not only beat Microsoft at the finances game, they've got more market capitalization than ExxonMobil.

      Apple is here to stay for the long term... for good or ill.

    • I personally think the level of speculation that goes around about new Apple products is absurd. As you say, just recently there has been a confluence of items that have conspired to send Apple news into overtime.

      However, I personally just ignore the items I feel are excess. I don't care about possible future products so I don't read the guesswork. I already knew Apple stock was heading up regardless so I don't pay attention to that news.

      Basically, it seems you have the power to filter the level of Apple

  • I hope that other companies take notice and start doing the same, and that the number of people abused in the name of capitalism decreases worldwide. The gadgets may become a tad more expensive, but hey, it may out to be worth it in the long run for everyone.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Workers are demanding a second hour of sleep a night. Apple representatives feel that a compromise would be possible that won't severely affect profit margins. Apple's offer of a picture of the company logo instead of an actual apple for dinner was flatly refused by the workers.

  • It's not enough that we ship our jobs overseas....but now we need to make sure that they're good jobs for those who get the jobs. I'm all for protecting workers...but the irony is thick.

    • It's not enough that we ship our jobs overseas....but now we need to make sure that they're good jobs for those who get the jobs. I'm all for protecting workers...but the irony is thick.

      It's only ironic if you care about things like nationalism.

      I could care less about nationalism, but I do care about healthy working conditions and respect at the workplace.

  • It's about time the North American companies that outsource to cheap offshore providers started inspecting those facilities and ensuring that abusive slave-labour environments aren't being created to save money and increase profits.

    If North America wants respect in the world, our companies need to export the GOOD things about our Canadian and American legal systems, not use offshoring to ESCAPE our regulations.

    Kudos to Apple for grabbing the bull by the horns. (Or is it a dragon by the beard this year

  • by nhtshot (198470) on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @02:00AM (#39029393)

    I've resisted posting on these threads because I don't want to start a war. However, I think it's finally time that I spoke up.

    Firstly, I live in China, speak Mandarin and Cantonese and build electronics among other things over here.

    I think this isn't a bad thing in concept, but everyone needs to get a little perspective on the issue. The educated workers, engineers and the like, are pretty well taken care of. They make middle class (for the region) wages, get weekends off and generally put in a comparable number of productive hours to US engineers.

    The factory workers, which are the ones that everyone seems to worry about also have it pretty good. They get company provided housing (no, the housing isn't up to western standards, but it's significantly better then where they grew up, I PROMISE). They also get company provided food (No, it isn't Ruth's Chris, but it isn't bad.. I frequently eat in the factory when I don't want to take the time to go out).

    Everyone is trying to apply western working standards to the workers over here. While I think it's great in principle, consideration has to be taken for cultural and lifestyle differences. Most of the people that are working in those factories came from a life of subsistence farming. They are also migrant workers. Their families live back in Henan, Hunan, Dongbei, etc... Most of them grew up in a single concrete room. They're quite lucky if their parents house had a flushable toilet.

    Making a thousand or two thousand RMB per month, having a decent bed to sleep in and 3 meals a day is a significant upgrade.

    With all of that said, I'm also a firm believer in giving them the opportunity for more. Everybody should have the chance to enjoy western working standards. But, it needs to be done in a patient manner. Expecting Apple to leverage Foxconn to give $10/hr and carpeted apartments to 200,000 workers is way out of proportion. Not only would it be prohibitively expensive, but it would screw up Foxconn's competitiveness.

    Remember, Iphones aren't the only thing made in Foxconn city. Hundreds of other electronics manufacturers make things there. If Foxconn doesn't stay competitive in Shenzhen, somebody will open a factory in Vietnam where they don't even have to feed their staff and pretty soon all of those people in SZ that everyone was so worried about will be out of work and back to subsistence farming.

    Let me repeat... I'm not opposed to this. A little external influence to help them move up the economic ladder is certainly not a bad thing. Neither are all the good intentions. What is a bad thing is expecting too much to happen too fast. China has advanced at it's own pace QUITE effectively in a single generation. We all need to bear that in mind.

    They have a long ways to go, but they've come a HELL OF A LONG WAYS from hole-in-the-ground toilets that don't flush.

    I'd say, we should all give Apple and Foxconn some credit for the 200,000 migrant children of farmers that now can feed their families back home and raise their children in better conditions then what they grew up in. Isn't that the "American Dream"? Giving more to your children then you had?

    • Excellent post. It's amazing what short memories people have. The Japanese and South Koreans both had periods very similar to what China is experiencing now, with workers living in crowded conditions and working for (comparative) peanuts. The US and UK also had terrible working conditions during their industrializing periods, probably worse than what the workers at Shenzhen experience.
      This is a positive step, and welcomed by anybody with a bit of pragmatism.

    • by Herkum01 (592704)

      Just because "they are better off than before" does not mean we should settle for less than "where it should be".

      • by nhtshot (198470)

        Absolutely. All I'm advocating is some patience in the process. I hope one day they can all enjoy the benefits that American factory workers receive.

        Oh, wait... the only benefit is 6 months of unemployment checks and a foreclosure notice.

        • by Kenja (541830)
          You could adjust that American "benefit" by treating China like they do us. Its what, 5% import tax on stuff from China while they charge closer to 30% for stuff from America? Of course US companies move their factories there, they want to sell in China and the US and the only way to do that is to build in China.
    • I sure appreciate your comments, they provide a much-needed counterpoint to the original article. My post on this subject was similar to yours in one place ---> "Remember, Iphones aren't the only thing made in Foxconn city. Hundreds of other electronics manufacturers make things there. If Foxconn doesn't stay competitive in Shenzhen, somebody will open a factory in Vietnam where they don't even have to feed their staff and pretty soon all of those people in SZ that everyone was so worried about will be
      • by nhtshot (198470)

        "At what point will we acknowledge that the disparity of wealth here in the USA is encouraging a wealth disparity throughout the entire 3rd world?"

        I'd never really looked at it that way. VERY interesting.. You've given me food for thought for a while.

    • by Darinbob (1142669)

      There's another viewpoint to make though. While the workers aren't as bad off as they could be, and even the bad conditions are an improvement over working in rice fields, this does not mean that consumers should just whistle a happy tune and let things be. There needs to be a pushback to increase working conditions. As soon as the west decides things are good enough then they'll never improve. The reason jobs are moving out of the west and into places like China and India is because the costs are lower

      • by nhtshot (198470)

        "They have a long ways to go. So keep pushing to make working conditions even better."

        Absolutely.

  • by chaz373 (671243) on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @02:17AM (#39029485) Homepage
    While Apple bashing is always fun, let us remember that Apple is not the only FoxConn client. So while you may revel in this negative publicity of APPLE, would you be as thrilled to hear that your Xbox 360, your PS3, your Wii, and your Kindle are also built at those same FoxConn factories? Whatever dirt is uncovered will not only tarnish the fruit company but also plenty of other tech titans from HP to Microsoft. So does your umbrage only extend to Apple Inc? My guess is that you will not be metering your indignation equally.
    • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

      by pegasustonans (589396)

      While Apple bashing is always fun, let us remember that Apple is not the only FoxConn client. So while you may revel in this negative publicity of APPLE, would you be as thrilled to hear that your Xbox 360, your PS3, your Wii, and your Kindle are also built at those same FoxConn factories?

      Who gives a fuck?

      The point is that the working conditions are shit, and they deserve better as human beings.

      I don't revel in positive or negative publicity for Apple

      I'm pissed off at this blatant exploitation of the lower class in China so clueless soccer families can have more shiny toys.

      As for Apple, I don't think about them much at all. They're part of the problem, other than that, I could care less.

    • by sgt scrub (869860)

      So does your umbrage only extend to Apple Inc?

      No. Just as I expected more than just Nike to investigate their sweatshops, I think all of their customers should pressure Foxconn to do right by their employees.

  • But was this a show akin to the Red Cross inspections at the Nazi POW camps? Just asking...

  • by retroworks (652802) on Tuesday February 14, 2012 @07:19AM (#39030905) Homepage Journal
    China, including (Taiwanese) Foxconn, is barreling down the same industrial revolution path as Europe, Japan and USA. There are no doubt some who will see the Apple certification effort cynically, but this is how change starts. The fact that China and Taiwan are working together making money via peaceful trade is worth more than anything. I'm an optimist about the future, not an apologist for the present, but recoiling from poverty is not the same as compassion. All the OEMs manufacturing in China are getting their hands dirty and risking their reputations, but the world is going to be better off than when China was cut off from world trade.

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