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United Kingdom Apple The 2000 Beanies

Arise SIR Jonathan Ive 183

Posted by timothy
from the there's-a-sword-for-that dept.
mariocki writes "Steve Jobs' go-to design man Jonathan Ive, the creator of modern computer design classics such as the iMac, MacBook Pro and iPod/iPhone/iPad, has been awarded a knighthood in the New Year's Honours list, taking him from plain old 'Mr' straight to 'Sir' in one fell swoop. This now puts him in the same league as Paul McCartney, Michael Caine, Bob Geldof and Bill Gates. Ive said 'I discovered at an early age that all I've ever wanted to do is design' and even for Apple haters his designs have done more for personal computer design than the mainstream PC manufacturers could imagine, taking the PC from the geek den into the living room of even the most painfully trendy fashionista."
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Arise SIR Jonathan Ive

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  • Design Matters (Score:5, Insightful)

    by InterestingFella (2537066) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @08:09AM (#38547120)
    As much as geeks don't like to admit it, design and user interfaces matter. It matters to them too. Just look at the backlash new Gnome UI and Firefox have got recently. Even more so, casual people care a lot about design and easy of use. So do people when they get older and don't have the time to tinker with everything.

    It's also why Linux will always fail - the whole principle of Linux is that there's no unified look and team that discusses, chooses and implements good UI and terms. In Linux world everyone just does whatever they want, often ignoring what or how others do it.

    Good example of this is the linux shell. It still acts like it's from the 90's because people don't work together to bring it together. It's still based on text output because everyone does things differently. Compare this to PowerShell which passes objects between programs. This allows different pieces of programs to work much better together, without need to define rules on how to parse some other programs output (which also usually fails in less used cases).

    Both Apple and Microsoft have got this. I hate to admit it but Windows 7 is the most beautiful Windows to date from Microsoft. So is Apple's OSX. If it wasn't for the games and some Windows only -apps I would use OSX because it is just much nicer to use. But there is no way in hell I would use Linux now. That might had been the case in 2005, but why would I do that? On top of polished interface and good design, OSX offers all the underlying tools that also make Linux powerful. And on Windows world there's PowerShell, which is much more powerful than GNU toolset has to offer.

    Sorry, but apart from server world Linux just isn't going anywhere. No one really cares about the open part. They care about what they can do, and how easily they can do that. By far, Windows and OSX both offer those things and much better than Linux.

    So good day Sir Ive!
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by gl4ss (559668)

      yeah, design matters. that's how current macbook pro sucks. metallic 90 degree angles right where you rest your hands!

      win7 rocks. the more I use osx the more I understand that and this isn't just trolling, it's a usability thing on large screens(or small screens with high dpi. osx sucks soooo hard on this, that's the reason they're shipping 1280x800 screens, up to fullhd resolution on 13" and it's unusable and unlike windows you just can't put high dpi mode that actually worked on), having multiple windows

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by pinkeen (1804300)
        Agreed. I installed MacOS on my 15.6" laptop with high density (1920x1200) screen and it sucked. MacOS just isn't designed for high density screens, there's no way to change DPI, and even if there was no good is gonna come out of this because no app is designed with this in mind.
        • Re: (Score:1, Interesting)

          by Anonymous Coward

          OSX has been prepping developers for High DPI screens since 10.4 and in 10.7 all of the UI assets are higher rez. Ready for the upcoming Mac Retina Displays.

          So basically you don't have a clue what you are talking about.

          • Re:Design Matters (Score:4, Informative)

            by PhunkySchtuff (208108) <kai&automatica,com,au> on Saturday December 31, 2011 @05:58PM (#38551528) Homepage

            Whilst the foundations for higher DPI displays have been in OS X for many years now, the fact remains that there is no vendor-supported method for a user to turn on high DPI mode at present, even through some of Apple's displays are quite high resolution.

            • I sat in on a talk at WWDC '98 about resolution-independent GUI's by the NeXT guys and it was going into OSX in the next release as far as they were concerned.

              They've had the technology but while Apple was all about killing with the best technology and driving towards openness at that time, by 2004 it was all about glam, fashion, proprietary, and consumer appeal.

              It's been good for profits, but if they now find themselves being left behind because they've neglected the technology - well, now at least new lea

    • by improfane (855034) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @08:19AM (#38547148) Journal

      Thank you Johnathan Ives,

      I commend the design of Apple products.

      I might strongly dislike Apple but I know a good design and I thank Sir Ive but not Steve Jobs as it influences the rest of the industry. Ive has done more for us than Steve Jobs. The thing I hate is the business practices with the walled garden and arrogance over my 'user experience'. (This probably comes from Steve Job)

      Thank god we now have Rounded Corners(tm).

      Offtopic: Hey GP, Are you InsightIn140Bytes =P?

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by gnasher719 (869701)

        Thank god we now have Rounded Corners(tm).

        Rounded corners since 1984. Unlike X Windows. Long time before Ives. Thanks, Bill Atkinson.

        If your actual intent was to make some snide remarks about things that you are clueless about, you should post what you mean so that your arguments can be taken apart.

        • by hairyfeet (841228)

          Actually I think his snide remark was more placed at the fact that "interestingfella" and " InsightIn140Bytes" are actually sock puppets of one guy, ala old twitter. Personally I LIKE Windows 7 and this is from a person that fricking hated the Mickey mouse UI of XP and thought Vista was more like XP with a black themepack. breadcrumbs? Rock. Taskbar jumplists? How in the hell did we live without those? it makes jumping to the folder i was working on yesterday as easy as 'right click and launch".

          as for TFA

      • by Anonymous Coward

        I'm pretty sure InsightIn140Bytes == InterestingFella. Close UID, same writing style, same opinions, both usernames use moderation names from /. My only real issue is him having arrogant usernames that declare him to be "insightful" or "interesting".

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Its Sir John, not Sir Ive

        (ie the Sir goes with the given name).

        • by improfane (855034)

          Oh that never occurred to me. I assumed it was like a normal title like Mr, Miss or Mrs.

          Thanks!

        • by dwater (72834)

          It's "It's", not "Its", unless you're referring to Sir John as an 'it', which I think would be a little rude.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Ynot_82 (1023749)

      What a load of tosh....
      Apple designer gets an award, you go off on an anti-linux rant
      anyway...

      As much as geeks don't like to admit it, design and user interfaces matter. It matters to them too. Just look at the backlash new Gnome UI and Firefox have got recently.

      The "backlash" to Gnome3, Unity and a few other projects that have rev'd their UI designs has not come from "casual people"
      It's come from geeks / power users
      They're complaining that design and overt snazzyness is detracting from the core usability
      Ca

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        It still acts like it's from the 90's because people don't work together to bring it together. It's still based on text output because everyone does things differently.

        A shell is supposed to provide direct access, text-only, to the OS and it's core programs for easy scripting and administration

        Compare this to PowerShell which passes objects between programs. This allows different pieces of programs to work much better together, without need to define rules on how to parse some other programs output (which also usually fails in less used cases).

        No idea what powershell is, so can't comment

        So basically you don't know what you're commenting on? There is nothing that prevents PowerShell being used in text mode. It is. But it doesn't only output as text, it passes objects. This means that if you pipe commands the other programs down the line get them as object, not as text that they need to parse and which can easily change. It works much better together.

        • So basically you don't know what you're commenting on? There is nothing that prevents PowerShell being used in text mode. It is. But it doesn't only output as text, it passes objects. This means that if you pipe commands the other programs down the line get them as object, not as text that they need to parse and which can easily change. It works much better together.

          Linux only provides the mechanism, but not the protocol, to pass objects between programs. The mechanisms are file descriptors, and sockets. To pass actual objects through those pipes or sockets, just install the protocol of your choice. XML perhaps? Or some binary format? Whatever you want.

          Python, for example, can be used as a shell and allows simple serialization of objects, so you can easily pass objects between programs using Python on Linux. Most other shell-like languages also let you do this on Linux

          • Python, for example, can be used as a shell and allows simple serialization of objects, so you can easily pass objects between programs using Python on Linux. Most other shell-like languages also let you do this on Linux, like Perl, and Haskell.

            So how do you pass objects between Python and Perl? Or between either and Haskell? "It gives you a choice" doesn't help when developers of different components that you're trying to make work together make incompatible choices.

            • So how do you pass objects between Python and Perl? Or between either and Haskell? "It gives you a choice" doesn't help when developers of different components that you're trying to make work together make incompatible choices.

              Do people actually use the object passing feature of powershell? I remember when the feature came out, I thought it was interesting, but do people actually use it? I haven't heard of anyone doing so, but it would be interesting to know about.

          • That's all well and good, but the reason people like Linux is that it gives you a choice.

            Every general purpose OS has a "choice". With this the difference between the two is Linux (and other Unix like OSs) use unstructured text for communicating between console programs, and Windows Powershell uses objects.

      • Winamp is still going. I still use it as my main mp3 player on my Windows box, because of the UI being small (though I might need to get new glasses soon). Now when you install it, you can choose the classic, small, uncluttered UI, or you can go for a large button clunky piece of crap. Unfortunately the default option is the large buttoned cluttered piece of crap. I choose the classic design every time.

      • by beelsebob (529313)

        It still acts like it's from the 90's because people don't work together to bring it together. It's still based on text output because everyone does things differently.

        A shell is supposed to provide direct access, text-only, to the OS and it's core programs for easy scripting and administration

        Well done for missing the point. Your kernel doesn't use strings all over the place, it uses data structures, same for your userland – they're not busy parsing strings and manipulating them internally, they're passing data structures around. Using a text interface onto it is a reasonable approach, it allows the user to easily interact –but... It also requires silly amounts of parsing and writing out in the programs, which can be unreliable. Passing data structures around, and having standardi

        • Passing data structures around, and having standardised methods of parsing and unparsing them allows program code to be much simpler, and more reliable.

          So what's the difference between "pass binary copies of data structures around" and "pass JSON representations of data structures around"? The latter can be used even between machines of different word sizes and byte orders. If you try to make a word-size- and byte-order-independent binary data interchange language, that's almost the same as just using JSON.

          • by beelsebob (529313)

            Agreed, that's pretty useful too... But that's not what UNIX programs do, they provide human-readable output, and expect that when you pipe this human readable output into another process, that other process will just suck it up and deal with it. Separating the human-readable part from the sending data structures (via json if you like) between programs as power shell does is what's necessary.

      • Same for any system that gives developers choice over the look and feel of their programs UI
        When I was a windows user, I remember a music program called "Winamp" (quick google says the project's still going)
        It's main selling point was it discarded the cluttered UI and overly large buttons and borders of the "standard winows UI", and used it's own custom design
        This cut down the screen wastage, and made the program non-intrusive
        You really want a system that's so rigid and inflexible that you /have/ to conform to a set way of doing things?

        I don't know of any general purpose OS that's "so rigid and inflexible that you /have/ to conform to a set way of doing things". They all have games for example that invariably have unique UIs.

        The point is that it's good to have a central set of UI paradigms that are used unless there's a good reason not to, such that users know what to expect. It can take the form of a document, or it can be implicit in the design of the applications that ship with the OS. Linux doesn't really have that. There's a big vari

    • by brillow (917507)

      I don't think any geek in the past decade has said that design doesn't matter.

      • Re: (Score:2, Flamebait)

        Geeks and Linux users constantly do. It's like with those gamers who say that graphics doesn't matter. They just cant comprehend that good graphics/UI and good gameplay/functionality can work together.
        • by tepples (727027)
          Gamers who say graphics don't matter probably want good-enough graphics and good gameplay because good-enough graphics are cheaper to produce (and, in the copyright business model, cheaper to buy) than stunning graphics.
        • I think that's because plenty of them view "design" as "prettiness", not because they actually think design doesn't matter.

          Design matters. Flashy translucent gradients don't.

    • Re:Design Matters (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Gordonjcp (186804) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @08:44AM (#38547234) Homepage

      I can't really agree with you there. The whole point of the Unix shell is to provide a textual interface to various things. If you want something more complex, use something more complex.

      I also don't see what's so great about Mac OSX or Windows 7. They're confusing and cluttered, and just look like a random mishmash of different widgets and design elements. There's no thought been put into the design, and it shows. Nothing is intuitive. Nothing is clear.

      • PowerShell supports text output too. But between apps it passes things in objects.
        • by Gordonjcp (186804)

          There's nothing to stop you serialising objects and passing them between Unix apps if you wanted - this is maybe what Powershell does, without you seeing it - but I still don't know why you'd want to.

          • by jonbryce (703250)

            In Powershell you can write scripts that access and manipulate those objects. You can't do that in Bash.

      • by Nemyst (1383049)

        I don't know on what planet you're living, but the Windows 7 I use is rather spartian in its look and feel. You have the Start menu, a paradigm around since the early 90s, perhaps earlier (I wasn't really aware of such things back then...) and a series of docked programs.

        Then the desktop, another decades-old convention, with desktop icons on it.

        So far I see nothing confusing or cluttered. It's clean, efficient, and in fact it's perhaps the best desktop UI I've used to date. It certainly beats Unity or GNOME

      • by antdude (79039)

        So, what is your favorite GUI OS then?

        • by Gordonjcp (186804)

          OpenSTEP.

          These days I quite like Haiku though.

          • by antdude (79039)

            Wow, I think I used it back in the 1990s/90s in computer science labs in Slackware and Red Hat Linux. Not much has changed (still ugly). :D

            • Just to disambiguate: he's probably talking about the NeXT implementation of OpenStep (NeXTStep) and you're probably talking about the GNUStep implementation, which was never as good. Well, at least since I used it last.

              I did prefer it to the other alternatives on Linux in the 90's though.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      It's also why Linux will always fail - the whole principle of Linux is that there's no unified look and team that discusses, chooses and implements good UI and terms. In Linux world everyone just does whatever they want, often ignoring what or how others do it.

      Yeah, like Android and their interface: totally not unified, not polished, impossible to use... wait a minute, what the fuck are you talking about?! Linux is a kernel, the rest is up to you. That's why geeks love it, it gives you choice for everything, and if you don't want choice, go with a professional distribution, like Android, or Ubuntu, or Mint.

      Good example of this is the linux shell. It still acts like it's from the 90's because people don't work together to bring it together. It's still based on text output because everyone does things differently. Compare this to PowerShell which passes objects between programs. This allows different pieces of programs to work much better together, without need to define rules on how to parse some other programs output (which also usually fails in less used cases).

      If you don't like the "Linux Shell" (it's called "Bash", learn what it is you are criticizing), then use some other shell that CAN pass objects between program

    • I disagree. The Linux desktop has plenty of examples of great design. The problem is that they're directed at a completely different target audience.

      Apple, particularly with iOS, designs towards being pleasant to the eye and immediately approachable by a new user. The Desktop Linux projects that try to do the same have much weaker designs, yes.

      Where Desktop Linux does have good design is when they target a different set of users, and try to accomplish different goals, particularly speed of usage. High infor

    • A minor point, but the Unix pipe is capable of passing any kind of data, not just text.

      Powershell is OK but let's not kid ourselves about it being "object oriented" - that's just marketing speak.

    • Another thing about the MacBook is its teflon coating - I've dropped it off my lap at least 3 times because of this.

      Sure looks cool, but is impractical for a laptop.

    • by digitig (1056110)

      Good example of this is the linux shell. It still acts like it's from the 90's because people don't work together to bring it together. It's still based on text output because everyone does things differently. Compare this to PowerShell which passes objects between programs. This allows different pieces of programs to work much better together, without need to define rules on how to parse some other programs output (which also usually fails in less used cases).

      And yet on Windows I often find myself powering up Cygwin, because some things are actually easier with the gnu toolset. For scripting I'd sooner use a scripting language than bash or PowerShell, and if I need to pass objects between programs then I'll either use COM or package the object in XML. Are there any PowerShell based tools out there that I might be passing objects to? No, I didn't think so, because PowerShell is solving a problem that was never actually there.

    • by PiSkyHi (1049584)
      I'm using KDE4 because believe it or not, to really have your nose high in the air about a quality user interface attached to a strong underlying OS you can delve into with ease, you need to be able to tie the process of building the interface to the ease of the interface and not be tied down the licencing. This is why Windows will always be virtualised into my Linux Desktop - despite WIndows 7 being the best Windows so far - many of the objects you may want to pass may not be reversibility in any form, as
    • by dbIII (701233)
      Can we please have a 4th option for "paid astroturf stirrer" on the friend/neutral/foe list?
      This article has NOTHING to do with linux anyway.
    • by jo42 (227475)

      Windows 7 is the most beautiful Windows to date from Microsoft

      Only if your idea of 'beauty' is a hideous default color scheme and putting as much disjointed crap on the screen as you can at one time.

      OS X is clean and elegant, Windows 7 is a jumbled mess of rancid dog crap.

  • by Qbertino (265505) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @08:14AM (#38547130)

    He was knighted with a sword made of translucent acryl.

    *Tadum* *Crash* *Thud*

    Thank you, thank you, I'm here all week.
    Tip your waiter and try the fish.

    • by bfandreas (603438)
      Terry Prachett made his own sword from a meteorite when he received his honours.
      That's as wonderful as owning a pet elephant.
      And I say this not in disrespect of Sir Jon. Design does matter. Usability helps with the potential usefulness of an item. In fact, bad usability marrs the usefulness of an item more than anything else. Apple understood this and slashed features for sake of usability.
      Take for instance a door handle. It serves one purpose and one alone. Ornaments should not get in the way of that. I
    • taking him from plain old 'Mr' straight to 'Sir' in one fell swoop

      Is that why they use a sword? So that can make you a knight in one fell swoop?

      Whatever. The British peers system is totally worthless anymore. Sure, congratulations are in order, but... why?

  • by tverbeek (457094) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @08:26AM (#38547162) Homepage

    The first comment already got this wrong, so a quick primer on how to use the title "sir".
    He can be referred to as simply "Jonathan Ive", or "Jonathan", or "Jony" or whatever; you don't have to use the title.
    You can call him "Sir Jonathan Ive" or "Sir Jonathan".
    However, "Sir Ive" is not correct; honorifics of this sort don't work like "doctor" or "president". It'd be like calling the current monarch "Queen Windsor".
    For women who are knighted, you'd simply substitute "Dame".

    • by PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @08:43AM (#38547230)

      You can call him "Sir Jonathan Ive" or "Sir Jonathan".

      "Now you can call me Ray, or you can call me J, or you can call me Johnny, or you can call me Sonny, or you can call me Junie, or you can call me Junior; now you can call me Ray J, or you can call me RJ, or you can call me RJJ, or you can call me RJJ Jr." ultimately ending with, "but you doesn't hasta call me Johnson!" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_J._Johnson [wikipedia.org]"

      Despite whatever titles granted to him by watery tarts hurling scimitars, I guess folks will just call him whatever they like.

    • In the US, we threw out the whole notion of titles a few hundred years ago. Of course, that doesn't stop people from reverting to their instinctual need to kow-tow to authority. Why do Americans care about the British royal wedding (but no other)? Were I ever to meet Jonathan Ive, or any of the other "knights," I would call him Mr., lest he have a higher degree (MD, PhD, etc.).
      • by tverbeek (457094)

        In the US, we threw out the whole notion of titles a few hundred years ago.

        We did? Then why are there four unemployed men wandering the country being addressed as "President _____"? And countless retired "Governor"s and "Senator"s and "General"s and "Admiral"s? While almost every university graduation ceremony involves someone walking away with the title "Doctor" despite never practicing medicine or pursuing grad-school studies? Just because they aren't assigned by order of a monarch doesn't mean these ar

  • by PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @08:30AM (#38547166)

    Apple gives Britain an iPad app to run the country . . . Britain gives Apple a Knighthood . . .

    . . . this was obviously an arranged exchange . . .

  • by Sc4Freak (1479423) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @08:36AM (#38547202)

    In ceremony of knighting, the knight-elect kneels on a knighting-stool in front of The Queen, who then lays the sword blade on the knight's right and then left shoulder.

    After he has been dubbed, the new knight stands up, and The Queen invests the knight with the insignia of the Order to which he has been appointed, or the Badge of a Knight Bachelor.

    Contrary to popular belief, the words 'Arise, Sir ...' are not used.

    Source: royal.gov.uk [royal.gov.uk]

  • What a surprise! (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward
    A rich, connected man gets a knighthood. How delightfully unexpected!
  • by A Friendly Troll (1017492) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @08:41AM (#38547228)

    Why not Sir Dieter Rams? I mean, the designs are basically his...

    • Re:Dieter Rams (Score:5, Informative)

      by gnasher719 (869701) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @08:48AM (#38547252)

      Why not Sir Dieter Rams? I mean, the designs are basically his...

      First, what you are saying "the designs ares basically his" is nonsense. Second, there are many more iPods and iPhones sold than Braun radios. Third, he is German and lived and worked in German, so he is way down on the Queen's list. Fourth, he's got the Commanders Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany, which Jony Ive has very little chance to get, for about the same reason.

      • In case you didn't know, the Queen mis German and one of the top things that soured Britain's view of Anazi Germany was their elimination of the aristocracy. In fact, that and the very effective and clever Nazi banking reforms are the primary reasons for the British anti-Nazi attitude.

        • by dwater (72834)

          The Queen is German? Er, I think not. She is English, of course. You probably meant something else...(heritage perhaps?).

          Oh, I see you said 'mis German'...perhaps I misunderstood...

        • by dbIII (701233)
          The Queen of England is no more German than George W. Bush is (not that it really matters anyway). As for the other bit, invading Poland really topped the list.
      • Ives may have listed Rams as an influence, but Rams never ever put for before function.

        I'ves did (or was pressured to)

        • Wow! Check out the number of really stupid grammatical & punctuation mistakes WMF made here.

          What a fucking idiot (or perhaps still under the influence of various NYE delights)

  • by Saphati (698453) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @09:05AM (#38547302) Homepage
    Sir Jonathan Ive is a KBE. To be exact, in the order of precedence, he is above Sir Paul McCarthney (who is an MBE) and Sir Michael Caine (who is a CBE), and Bill Gates (is only an honorary knight. He cannot use the title. If he were British, he would be a KBE). He ranks equally with Sir Bob Geldof who is also a KBE. The whole Order of Precedence (in England and Whales) is very complicated, and to an American, a bit silly.
    • by jeremyp (130771) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @09:51AM (#38547466) Homepage Journal

      Sir Jonathan Ive is a KBE.
      To be exact, in the order of precedence, he is above Sir Paul McCarthney (who is an MBE)

      Paul McCartney received the MBE along with the other Beatles in 1964. The MBE does not entitle the holder to call himself "Sir". McCartney was upgraded to full knighthood in 1996. McCartney and Michael Caine are actually knights bachelor which ranks above KBE. The confusion arises because they were both awarded non knight honours earlier.

      The whole Order of Precedence (in England and Whales) is very complicated, and to an American, a bit silly.

      The order of precedence in whales is blue, sperm, humpback....

      • A KBE is a knight of an order of chivalry (the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire), and so out ranks all Knights Bachelor even when they additionally hold junior ranks in an order (such as MBE or CBE).
        In fact Jonathan Ive like Paul McCartney already had an MBE.

    • by moreati (119629)

      The whole Order of Precedence (in England and Whales) is very complicated, and to an American, a bit silly.

      It's silly to us as well.
      Regards, A Brit

  • Mr Ive was "hurt" by Mr Jobs taking credit for innovations that came from the design team.

    wait, you mean Jobs isnt the angelic being everyone has made him out to be?

  • by mbone (558574) on Saturday December 31, 2011 @10:23AM (#38547666)

    I would have been more impressed if he had turned it down.

    "Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government."

  • "taking the PC from the geek den into the living room of even the most painfully trendy fashionista.""

    Yeah thanks.

  • I thought Ian Maxtone Jones [imdb.com] invented the iPod. ;-)
  • There persists the impression that Kinghthood is some rare and impressive award - it isn't. Between the Birthday and New Years lists, a couple of thousand Knights are created each year, many for rather minor things. (Like 'services to the youth of Manchester' for a charity official.)

    You can read more about the system, and download recent lists, here [direct.gov.uk].

    • Employee of the month happens every month but when you or your friends nab it it's nice.

    • by shilly (142940)

      You have confused the number of people who get an honour with the number who are made knights. In the NY list just published, 983 people got an honour of some sort; only 27 were made knights bachelor (the most common type of knight). Jony Ive was one of only two people made a KBE.

      In addition, being made even an OBE is a pretty uncommon thing -- there are a couple of thousand awards each year, yes, but there are at least 40m people in the UK who are potentially capable of receiving an award, so the rate of a

  • Ive said 'I discovered at an early age that all I've ever wanted to do is design'

    Bit pretentious talking about himself in the third person though... wonder why he called himself "Ive" though and not "Jonathan"?! ;)

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