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Galaxy Tab 10.1 Vs. iPad 2 Review 524

Posted by samzenpus
from the head-to-head dept.
DeviceGuru writes "DeviceGuru's 10-inch tablet smackdown pits Samsung's Galaxy Tab 10.1 against Apple's iPad 2. At price parity the iPad 2 is probably a better bet for the average user since it's a more stable, near-perfect device with a rich assortment of apps for nearly every possible function you'd like to perform on a tablet, reasons the post. However, with the Samsung tablet's cost of goods rumored to be around $215 versus $260 for the iPad 2 for comparable models, Samsung could drop its 10-inch tablet's price to $425 and pose a serious challenge to Apple's device. But will they...?"
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Galaxy Tab 10.1 Vs. iPad 2 Review

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  • Better Value (Score:4, Interesting)

    by sonicmerlin (1505111) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @04:54PM (#36941202)
    If you can go on Newegg you can already get a 7 inch dual-core tablet for $300. Or you could get the Transformer for $400. Pretty soon Archos will release their own 10 inch dual core versions for sub $400. Heck the Viewsonic G Tablet has been out since last year for $300. Competitors will drive down the price of these tablets until they've pushed margins so low we finally get sub $300 10 inch tablets. Until then however I think the iPad 2 is just better bang for the buck.
    • Re:Better Value (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Starteck81 (917280) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:05PM (#36941262)
      I think it's wise to focus purely on the specs. WARNING CAR ANALOGY: It's like having powerful car but the seat is milk crate and the steering wheel is made of unpolished metal rods welded into a square. Sure, it's fast but the ergonomics are so awful that who would really want to use it? Most of the cheaper tablets out there suffer from the same problem.
      • Re:Better Value (Score:5, Interesting)

        by KreAture (105311) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:17PM (#36941338)
        That is exactly how I feel the ipad is. Polished on the outside, secret on the inside and I am not allowed to peek inside nor add any update not approved by the manufacturer and without paying the manufacturer a piece of the update-price.
        Oh, and the ipad comes without a passanger-seat and lighter-plug meaning if someone wants a ride, they have to take my seat, and I can't plug in anything.
        • Re:Better Value (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Starteck81 (917280) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:51PM (#36941582)
          This is not a personal attack so please don't take it as such. I understand that you want to play with the engine and stuff behind the dash board but that means you are not the target audience for iDevice products. Android is a better choice for you. My comment was aimed at the other 90% of the populations that do not want to tinker with the stuff behind the dashboard. Would you not agree that the iPad is a better choice for those who do not wish to tinker? If not please explain why.
          • Re:Better Value (Score:4, Insightful)

            by oakgrove (845019) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:57PM (#36941620)
            Could you please explain to me what on my Xoom requires "tinkering"? It works pretty freaking well as far as I can see. I have had plenty of time with iPads and I don't see how they are easier to operate than an Android tablet with Honeycomb.
            • by JorDan Clock (664877) <jordanclock@gmail.com> on Sunday July 31, 2011 @06:23PM (#36941758)

              Could you please explain to me what on my Xoom requires "tinkering"?

              The price.

            • Re:Better Value (Score:4, Insightful)

              by WrongSizeGlass (838941) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @06:35PM (#36941824)

              Could you please explain to me what on my Xoom requires "tinkering"?

              Nothing requires tinkering. But if you want to tinker then the Xoom is a better choice. If you don't want to tinker then either device is a (potentially) a good choice based on your wants, needs and any other Android or iOS devices you own or use.

            • by Xest (935314)

              Agreed, I actually own an iPad 2, but not an Android tablet. I do however have an Android phone.

              There's a lot of rough edges on the iPad, it's merely a myth by Apple fanboys that it's got a somehow perfect UI experience. I don't know how Android tablets compare, because I've never used one, but certainly compared to Android on my phone, Android is the nicer OS imo. It has no more rough edges than the iPhone, and yet has a lot more features.

              To cite some examples, I don't like how in the Apple store, if you w

          • by cynyr (703126)

            I think the better part of your argument is the lack of "the passenger seat" (multiple account support). These devices really do get passed round/left on a coffee table. I know if i had one, and left it out i would expect that my guests feel free to pick it up and play with it.

            Both iOS and Android are rather weak in this area to be honest and I hope someone gets it together soon. I'd still probably not consider the iPad due to the hood being welded shut, but with the correct maintenance agreement i could be

        • Re:Better Value (Score:5, Informative)

          by nathanh (1214) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @07:10PM (#36942064) Homepage

          That is exactly how I feel the ipad is. Polished on the outside, secret on the inside

          It's not secret on the inside. The hardware and software APIs are extremely well documented. You are confusing your ignorance of the product with an imagined secrecy.

          I am not allowed to peek inside nor add any update not approved by the manufacturer

          You are allowed to peek inside - Apple even has a free developer program and downloadable tools to let you do exactly that. Download the free OS developer tools, develop any app you like, and install your app on your IOS device.

          The only caveat is that Apple won't help you install "whatever update you like". And you most certainly can't sell products on the Apple App Store that don't conform to their rules. But there's nothing stopping *you* from installing *your* apps on *your* devices.

          This is what irks me about the supposedly Free Software and Open Source advocates when it comes to Apple's IOS. Free Software could really go to town on IOS. For example, Apple won't distribute MAME through their App Store; and fair enough too. But anybody with a free developer account could compile the source code for MAME for IOS (assuming it exists) into an app, sign that build with their developer certificate, then upload the binary onto their own phone.

          Instead people bitch-and-moan that they can't use Apple's App Store to distribute binaries. Why is that a problem? This is a community built on open source and free software. So why not distribute the apps as source. If open-source is such a big deal, why the fascination with bundling everything up as binaries and asking Apple to distribute it?

          So you could have any app you like on your iPad or iPhone. The only barrier to entry is you need to know how to compile and install software. Is that really a problem in the Free Software world which has distros like Gentoo? It would keep out all the annoying non-developers too. It would be like the good old days of Linux when everybody actually knew UNIX; before the hoi-polloi found out about it and fucked it up.

          • by blacklint (985235)

            Unless it has changed in the past couple years since I've last looked, deploying code to your own iOS device requires a $99/year developer subscription. Which very much is preventing me from installing my apps on my devices. The free tools don't provide you with a certificate to deploy to real hardware, only the emulator.

        • by peragrin (659227)

          90% of the population won't change their own oil, and only put air in the tires when they have too.

          these people put gas in their cars and that is all. iDevices are similar, you set it up once, and maybe add a fancy steering wheel cover, and that is it.

          • I don't change my own oil for two reasons: if I screw it up, I'm the only one to blame, and it costs me more in supplies to change my own oil than it does to pay Jiffy Lube. Taking my car to Jiffy lube every 5-6 months, buying tires and a battery every three years, and filling it up is all car maintenance should be. If it is anything else, you are a serious hobbyist, or you are doing it wrong.

            5 quarts of generic oil at wal-mart (with tax is $20). A standard oil change, plus filter at Jiffy lube is $25, an

        • by PopeRatzo (965947) *

          That is exactly how I feel the ipad is. Polished on the outside, secret on the inside and I am not allowed to peek inside nor add any update not approved by the manufacturer and without paying the manufacturer a piece of the update-price.

          Where does the fun come in?

          I know I'm in the minority, but if I can't pop the lid and mess with the noodles without violating some eternal oath, or having it turned by remote control into a very slick-looking trivet, it's just not for me.

          God bless 'em for selling a zillion.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by zoffdino (848658)
      My manager bought the Viewsonic G Tablet the same time I bought my iPad 2. His reasoning was that the G Tablet has the same hardware, hackable to run Honeycomb but at half the price of the iPad. He tried to sell it 2 weeks later for a $50 discount and no buyer as of yet (3+ months). It really scared me about the things that the G can't do: Skype video call, Netflix streaming, dearth of apps. At least Angry Birds was good. Even if Samsung is willing to take a dive and have a $75 price advantage over the iPa
      • by Microlith (54737)

        The G Tablet runs the same android as most other tablets. It's problem is the shitty screen that makes it unusable, and it came out running Android 2.2, so you had to root and install the market before it was usable.

  • If you're the kind that likes to do a lot of handwaving about openness while boring all your friends and have a 'DIY attitude' (read: lots of free time), buy the Galaxy Tab. Everyone else, stay away until they either become significantly cheaper than the iPad or Android has caught up in marketshare and polish (which, conveniently, is always 6 months from now.)

    • Everyone else, stay away until they either become significantly cheaper than the iPad or Android has caught up in marketshare and polish (which, conveniently, is always 6 months from now.)

      Or you could wait 5 years and get holographic storage.

    • Exactly. (Score:4, Interesting)

      by MrEricSir (398214) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:22PM (#36941372) Homepage

      (which, conveniently, is always 6 months from now.)

      As someone who works in the open source world, I gotta say that's not only spot on, but applies to almost all open source software. You're trading ease of use for configurability and openness, at the cost of glitches and big, empty promises.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward
        Bull-fucking-shit.

        I am using a Thinkpad R60 right now with Ubuntu 10.04 LTS. Everything works perfectly. All of the hardware works. When I close the lid, it immediately goes into standby. When I open it, it immediately comes out. Wireless, bluetooth, everything flawless. The software I run has yet to crash one single time. Firefox runs perfectly. Chromium-browser runs perfectly, all of the cli apps (ssh, vi, etc.) run perfectly. Networking, i.e., Samba, apache, ssh server, run perfectly. There i

      • Re:Exactly. (Score:5, Funny)

        by manekineko2 (1052430) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @06:23PM (#36941760)

        (which, conveniently, is always 6 months from now.)

        As someone who works in the open source world, I gotta say that's not only spot on, but applies to almost all open source software. You're trading ease of use for configurability and openness, at the cost of glitches and big, empty promises.

        Yeah, that's why I'm still running Internet Explorer. Firefox and Webkit (among the most popular and widely distributed of open source software) may have configurability and openness, but they'll never match Internet Explorer for its ease of use, lack of glitches and fulfilled promises.

    • by gutnor (872759) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:26PM (#36941410)
      Executive summary: unlike the rest of the iPad competitor, the Galaxy tab look like a worthy competitor, meaning 95% of everything you would do on one work well on the other. If you are an ios user and happy, buy an iPad. If you are a bit bored after so many iPhone, just buy the Galaxy tab for a change. Vice versa for Android users.

      For new users, if you like tinkering, the galaxy tab is for you. Otherwise, get an iPad, to have *today* the reference tablet, or a Galaxy Tab 2 to have an old version of *tomorrow* reference tablet (Galaxy Tab 3). Unless you need flash, in that case, buy a laptop.

    • by jedidiah (1196)

      ...kind of depends on what you want to do with a tablet/phone and whether or not this will run afoul of Steve's vision and what the devout fanboys think you should be doing with a tablet.

      More and more it becomes easier and easier to want things that the devout fanboys will call "geeky".

    • by vlm (69642) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:36PM (#36941484)

      Everyone else, stay away until they either become significantly cheaper than the iPad or Android has caught up in marketshare and polish (which, conveniently, is always 6 months from now.

      6 months from now, when the androids can finally compete head to head with the ipad2, and all the early adopters have expired after being shot in the back with arrows, I'm sure sales against the ipad3 with retina display or whatever its supposed to have will be ... once again, not so brisk; but I promise once again, in just 6 more months, we'll have an Ipad3-killer android tablet ... ready by the rollout of the ipad4...

  • by node 3 (115640) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:07PM (#36941272)

    Every Android vs iPad review, summed up:

    "The iPad is the best product, hands down, but if you don't mind dealing with a bunch of issues, the Android tablet is a strong contender."

    It's like all reviewers need a horse race, and will bend over backwards to try to say nice things about the Android tablets. Do you think they'd do the same if the tables were reversed?

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      No, they grade Apple on a curve.

      When no one had Macs, marketshare was proof that Macs were inferior. Now that everyone has i-Devices, marketshare is proof that the owners are sheep.

    • by stephanruby (542433) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @07:58PM (#36942342)

      What are you implying? That the Samsung Tab 10.1 is all bad?

      You may not seem to like this, but the Samsung Tab 10.1 is a strong contender (to the big iPhone lookalike). For some people with expensive existing music collections/movie collections (that predate iTunes or that were not gotten through iTunes), an Android tablet is really the only option they have. To a consumer, it's not a question of freedom, they rarely care about that, it's really a question of being able to play the stuff they already paid for.

      Not only that, but the Samsung Tab is lighter and feels better in your hands than the iPad 2, and has the ability to turn off the auto-screen rotation (not just on an application basis, but on the entire device, this is useful when you're using it while laying in bed). And unlike the iPad 2, the Honeycomb version of Android was designed with the size of the larger screen in mind. Haven't you noticed that the screen icons of the iPad 2 are far too spread apart than they really need to be? And don't get me started on multi-tasking which the iOS still hasn't gotten right (despite their claims to the contrary).

      And if you happen to own an hdmi-enabled television/flat screen, the next best choice is probably the Xoom, not the iPad2 (which tries to control everything you try to video-out). With a Xoom, you can mirror anything you have on your screen, you can play games on the big screen, you can play your music collection/movie collection through it. You can do anything through it. This is a huge plus for my friends. With the iPad 2, the only way it will allow you to play a movie through to a bigger screen is only if you purchase the movie through iTunes (it won't even allow your netflix streaming to go through to a bigger screen unless you're willing to purchase that same movie a second time).

      So like I said, the Samsung Tab is a strong contender, and even the Xoom (in some areas). And unless Apple loosens up the control it holds over everything you do on your iPad, it's leaving huge openings for Android-based tablets to sweep in and take over some of the Market.

      • by node 3 (115640)

        You are 100% incorrect about HDMI mirroring on the iPad 2.

        As for any existing Android tablet as being a "strong contender", that flies in the face of reality. You are making a theoretical claim (for example, that the Tab feels better, or that icon spacing on the iPad is a problem, etc.). This is all well and good, but the fact is that the iPad is outselling all Android tablets by a very wide margin, so clearly these aspects which you claim make the Android tablets "strong contenders", in reality, don't.

      • To be fair the iPad 2 also let you lock orientation device wide. In fact it let you bind the lock button for that task and its very handy.

  • From early in the Gripes list:

    Occasionally, view orientation momentarily switches back/forth between portrait and landscape modes for no apparent reason; only happens when it's on its stand, slightly reclined.

    Then a little later on in the same list:

    The device occasionally switches between landscape and portrait modes for no reason, when operated on stand (a setting can lock it, however).

    I guess it was really annoying to list it twice!

  • by Necroman (61604) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:12PM (#36941300)

    Disclaimer: I got my galaxy tab for free, so I have a little extra love for it.

    I've been using the tablet for a couple months now and I'm pretty happy with it. Since the Android 3.1 update came out, it fixed a lot of the initial software issues I had with the device. My biggest annoyance is the lack of Netflix support. But overall, it's been great for web browsing and standard tablet activities.

    Pros:

    • Flash support. (could be listed as a con also, due to flash advertisements and focus stealing issues).
    • A more open app store. For example, I wanted an app that showed wireless AP strength. Android has some nice apps for it, the iPhone does not since the APIs on the iphone/ipad are private.
    • Choice of web browser and mail app. You get popups like on windows saying "which app do you want to open this in".

    Cons:

    • Android devices vary quite a bit from one another in both firmware version of device configuration. This causes apps to not always behave properly on your device, or not be supported yet (skype and netflix).

    In the deeper parts of the device I'm sure I could find complaints, but as a web browser/email client and occasionally playing games on it, my Galaxy Tab 10.1 has been a good experience (again, since 3.1 came out).

    The 3.0 firmware that was originally on the Tab was really buggy. I had lots of rendering errors when visiting various websites (Google News was a big offender). but they fixed all my major issues since then.

    • by oakgrove (845019) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:31PM (#36941462)
      I also got my Xoom for free.

      I've had my Xoom almost since it first came out and I, as you, have had a much improved experience following the 3.1 update. A friend of mine as well as my boss both have iPads that I have had much experience with and here's my 2 cents.

      I prefer the Xoom for the following reasons:
      The web browser makes more sense ergonomically on a tablet than Safari does on the iPad since it has tabs that are always viewable.
      Higher resolution widescreen display.
      I prefer the way multitasking works as I just hit a button on the taskbar and thumbnails of currently running programs display to pick from.
      Always visible and consistent "back" button on the taskbar.
      Widgets
      Wi-fi hangs on to a signal better. My boss is constantly getting the "would you like to sign up for a cellular plan" pop-up on his iPad when the wi-fi falls down.
      Google Music integration with the music player so all of my stuff is always at hand.
      Scripting layer for Android so I can write and run python scripts right on the device.
      Choice of keyboards including "Hacker's Keyboard" that gives me access to all keys including Esc, Ctrl, and Alt for vnc/ssh sessions.
      Firefox web browser that stays in sync with my desktop browser including tabs/settings/passwords, etc.
      Ubuntu chroot so I have an industrial strength cli environment right on the device.

      About the only advantages I see for iPad is the interface is smoother and their are more tablet oriented apps. Some people claim that it is simpler to operate but I don't really think that is the case. I have yet to see any particular exclusive apps that would draw me away from Android and I can get past the relatively small difference in smooth. YMMV.

      • by shutdown -p now (807394) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @09:18PM (#36942790) Journal

        There is one huge disadvantage that I see with Honeycomb tablets: the stock browser is a horrible, slow piece of crap. It's probably the fourth time I post this on Slashdot, but this just serves to highlight the point: there have been two Honeycomb updates already (3.1 and 3.2) and none of them fixed it. It is still impossible to post a comment on Slashdot using the stock Honeycomb browser: the typing lag is so slow that it is an exercise in frustration and nothing else. Meanwhile, Safari on iPad can do so just fine. Heck, browser on my Android phone can do it!

        And before I get a bunch of replies about how it's Slashdot HTML/JS that's crap (it is, but it's not relevant in this case) - it's not just Slashdot. Same problems on XDA forums, for example, A bunch of other places, too.

        I can't imagine how this kind of bug can go unfixed for two significant updates.

  • by Sarusa (104047) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:17PM (#36941336)

    I've had an iPad since the day it launched. And I do like the hardware and I prefer the screen ratio to the Android tablet widescreen - the page size is better for reading magazines and comics.

    Then Woot had a sale on refurbed XOOMs and I bought one. Imagine, I can just plug it in with mini-USB and transfer files or SSH them over wifi. I can replace the soft keyboard with a better one. I can have mail on my 'desktop'. Basically, there's very little I can't control, especially with Tasker. The screen on the XOOM is not quite as good as the iPad's in sunlight, and of course the iPad has a far better game selection, but I don't think I can go back at this point. So since I think the Tab 10.1 is better hardware than the XOOM except for that stupid proprietary cable that'd be even better.

    My biggest regret is that I could only delete iTunes from my computer and not skull@#$ it till it died, since that's what I feel like it was doing to me every time I was forced to use it.

    • What do you transfer files for? Serious question, because one of the greatest things Apple has done with the iPad is get rid of the antiquated concept of the file system. Obviously, iOS is a work in progress, but I can't see why I'd want to put files on a tablet computer a year from now.

      • by Sarusa (104047)

        The serious answer is for putting music on, putting reading material on, and putting photos on for slideshows. I have far too much music to fit on any tablet and there's only about 10 CDs I want to listen to at any given time, so I just copy the artist/[year]_album directory over or delete it.Then there's scanslated manga, which comes in zips or rars, or pdfs of books like 'Machine of Death'. Copy those over, delete when read. I realize some people love iTunes to death for this, but since I'm well organized

      • How does the iPad get around the concept of the file system? (serious question, I really would like to know)

        For example, if I download an image in my web browser, how do I select it in image editing software, and then take the result and email it to my friend in my email software?

      • by cathector (972646)

        i'm not sure i understand the theory here; files seem like a good thing.

        i agree that relieving the user of the burdens of file-management as much as possible is good,
        but i think our OSs need to preserve the concept that they need to support 'documents' of unanticipated types
        which multiple unanticipated apps can work with. .. which sounds like files to me.

        or are you suggesting that we still have a filesystem, it's just not on the device ?

        or perhaps another clarifying question is: how does the "camera roll" i

  • Here's something I've never understood...

    Samsung could drop its 10-inch tablet's price to $425 and pose a serious challenge to Apple's device. But will they...?

    Why would anyone trade so much away for 10% of the price in a luxury market?

    There's no way I'd drop most of my half of a mortgage payment on something that "kinda works sometimes" when I could just toss in the cost of a nice night out and get the top of the line...

    Imagine if the decision was to buy the yugo for $9K or the BMW for $10K. You can have a grilled to perfection steak dinner for $5 or save a whopping 50 cents by having a three day old mcdonalds burger inst

    • by jedidiah (1196)

      ...except in the real world it's the Yugo that doesn't fly apart into pieces.

      Again with the clueless "BMW" remarks from the devout fanboys. I doubt if any of these jokers have ever been inside a BMW.

      Some people are just brand fixated and will pay a lot of money for the right logo.

      • by vlm (69642) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @05:44PM (#36941538)

        Tactical error on my part. A better standard /. analogy would have been:

        $9K for a used beater from '05 with 100K miles driven hard by teenage fast-and-the-furious wannabe that often breaks down vs $10K for a new one of whatever jedidiah thinks is a decent car brand.

        The point remaining, if I'm gonna toss out a substantial amount of dough for a luxury, I want it to "just work perfectly", not be "kinda close for 10% less".

        "Kinda close for 10% less" is how you sell 6-32 screws to engineers who wanted to use 8-24 screws but the boss forced the redesign because its a little cheaper. "Kinda close for 10% less" is not how you sell luxury goods.

        "Here's my new Rowlex... Its almost like a Rolex, in that its worn on a wrist and tries to tell time, but not really, because it doesn't work. Oh well, I saved 10%" ... um, maybe, just maybe, that would fly at a 2600 meeting, but probably no where else..

    • This is it exactly. The Apple premium is exactly what Kutaragi (Father of the PS3) was describing when he said " It will be expensive ... for consumers to think to themselves 'I will work more hours to buy one'. " .
  • TFA:

    [Get the iPad]...unless you’ve got a grudge against Apple for some reason, or are enamored with the idea of having a more configurable tablet

    He just described ~80% of slashdotters there. So go get your Galaxy Tabs, folks.

    • by PCM2 (4486)

      That's weird. You say the Galaxy Tab has already been declared the winner, but the link you provide declares the iPad the winner... and goes as far as to use words like "obnoxious," "tolerable," "hurts to look at," "sledge hammer approach," and "Samsung ruined it" to describe the Galaxy Tab. (Note that the review is just of the various tablets' screen technologies.)

  • by JackAxe (689361) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @07:53PM (#36942322)
    I have an iPad(iOS 5 -- I'm a developer.) and an ASUS Transformer to name just two of my tablets. My iPad is really just glorified personal media player -- and at that task it's overpriced. My ASUS on the other hand is closer to my MacBook Pro with the niceties of a tablet. For what I do and what I like, it's hands down better on almost every front

    I MY FREAKING OPINION -- just like the article this is linked to:
    The iPad is for someone that's heavily invested in iTunes and enjoys an overly simplified UI that holds one's hand and lets that user know exactly what they can and can not do. It's a device that throws individuality out the door in favor of conformity -- every iOS device looks pretty much the same with only a slight variation in the background and it's pretty sad that almost all of them have AngryBirds installed. iOS has become rather generic.

    The iPad is a safe and limited tablet that will rarely evolve beyond what it is now. It's main purpose is to keep the user in Apple's eco-system and it does an excellent job at that task.

    Android(Honeycomb) tablets on the other hand, are for those that want the consumption strengths of a tablet, but WAY more functionality like a traditional OS. They're devices for the tinkers, the individuals, power users. People that don't readily conform to one generic set standard and would like to personalize their experience outside of just having different apps available.

    They're excellent devices for those that don't need their hand held and can make decisions on their own.
  • by Antisyzygy (1495469) on Sunday July 31, 2011 @10:00PM (#36943016)

    At price parity the iPad 2 is probably a better bet for the average user since it's a more stable, near-perfect device with a rich assortment of apps for nearly every possible function you'd like to perform on a tablet, reasons the post.

    Come on. I like how the OP tacked on "reasons the post" at the end to somehow claim objectivity. You did a great job of being objective OP.

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