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Music Apple

John Linnell of They Might Be Giants Talks Tech 111

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the birdhouse-in-my-trs80 dept.
harrymcc writes "We've published Benj Edwards' wide-ranging interview with John Linnell, one half of the 30-year musical partnership known as They Might Be Giants. He talks about his life as a technology user--from his first encounter with the Radio Shack TRS-80 to his mastery of Asteroids to the band's long-time use of Macs to its pioneering experiments on online music."
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John Linnell of They Might Be Giants Talks Tech

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  • TMBG... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Moryath (553296) on Monday June 13, 2011 @09:21AM (#36424804)

    often referred to as "The Thinking Man's Drinking Band."

    Nerds everywhere thank them for giving us intelligent music in a time when the soul of music has nearly vanished.

  • Re:Hmmm.... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 13, 2011 @09:33AM (#36424906)
    Not sure what your point is here. Are you saying it's hypocritical to advocate for "human rights" while purchasing/using (or even evangelizing) Apple products?

    First of all, it's worth nothing that Foxconn factories make more than just Apple products. All the major manufacturers use Foxconn or similar factories with similar working conditions (actually, according to some reports Apple puts slightly more effort than other companies at insuring that worker standards are decent, but let's ignore that for now). So, basically, this isn't an "Apple" issue, this is a "technology" issue.

    So, is it hypocritical to advocate for "human rights" while purchasing/using (or even evangelizing) technology? That's a tough question. Ultimately all aspects of our modern living take a toll on the environment, and, unfortunately, on other people. I suppose one could be blithely selfish and simply not care about other people's rights or standards of living. That would be less hypocritical, I suppose, but certainly not more moral.

    There are also the usual progress-based arguments like: "it's better for those workers to have some kind of job rather than none", or "technology helps us be more efficient and helps us lift more people out of poverty", or "everyone is entitled to some luxuries, the key is being reasonable in one's impact", and many many others. What's my point here? My point is that there are some legitimate moral dilemmas here, and we should certainly be debating them, and figuring out a good path forward. But painting a caricature wherein "Mac users" are fundamentally and universally hypocritical (moreso than other tech users?) is a complete waste of time.
  • Re:TMBG... (Score:2, Insightful)

    by chemicaldave (1776600) on Monday June 13, 2011 @09:44AM (#36425006)

    in a time when the soul of music has nearly vanished.

    Okay old man. Every generation since the 30s has said this about "new" music.

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