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Apple Announces iCloud and iWork For iOS

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  • by hackertourist (2202674) <<ln.tensmx> <ta> <tsiruotrekcah>> on Tuesday May 31, 2011 @04:26PM (#36301212)

    Autosave, Version and Resume are major improvements, and long overdue for desktop OSes.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      I have seen all of them on other OSes, just not dressed up to look as pretty...
      • by node 3 (115640)

        I have seen all of them on other OSes

        No, you haven't. Not desktop OSs at any rate.

        Autosave: I don't know a single OS that has it. Programs, sure, but not OSs.
        Versions: Aside from some snapshotting filesystems, I am unaware of any OS which has this either, although snapshots are similar enough. VSS is also similar, but much cruder. This is significantly more than having RCS (or similar) installed.
        Resume: The only consumer OS I'm aware of with this is iOS. I assume there must be some mainframe systems which have something similar.

        just not dressed up to look as pretty...

        They aren't mer

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          First of all, I strongly doubt that Apple has written an OS that adds autosave or resume to every running application. If they did, I will be impressed; more likely, applications must use specific OS hooks to get these features. That being said:
          • Resume was in KDE3, and to the best of my knowledge KDE4 supports it; all KDE programs benefited from it, and even a few non-KDE programs. Considering how broad KDE was, KDE/GNU/Linux should qualify as an "operating system." You may disagree, but then the argume
          • First of all, I strongly doubt that Apple has written an OS that adds autosave or resume to every running application. If they did, I will be impressed; more likely, applications must use specific OS hooks to get these features.

            Why? Autosave is something you could implement today for any given OS X application using AppleScript. All you need is to do is write a 3 linear script that calls the "Save" hook every couple of minutes. Of course that isn't all that desirable, since the user should be able to control when the original gets overwritten. But as soon as you have a versioning file system, that concern no longer exists. Just automatically send call the save function of all applications every couple of minutes. For resume, you j

            • ...and all your X11 applications or terminal applications will be excluded from your very simple solution. If you are restricting the discussion to "only Cocoa applications," then I will respond by noting that restricting the discussion to other frameworks -- "only KDE3 applications, only LibreOffice/Uno applications, etc." leads us to the conclusion that this has been implemented before. Yes, if your framework forces applications to use a well-define "save" function, rather than something like POSIX API
              • Well, we are getting into semantics here, but on OS X, "application" != "program". An application is everything packaged into a ".app" directory. By and in large the described method will work for these applications. The method will not work for all "programs", i.e. stuff started on the command line etc.

                • Well if we can just redefine words like that...

                  The point is that this feature is not an Apple original, it has been done before.
              • And why should Apple give a shit about X11 or terminal apps?

                X11 on OSX needs to die anyway.

          • by node 3 (115640)

            First of all, I strongly doubt that Apple has written an OS that adds autosave or resume to every running application. If they did, I will be impressed; more likely, applications must use specific OS hooks to get these features.

            Just every Cocoa application that is recompiled for 10.7. You don't have to do anything to take advantage of it, it's part of the OS. However, you can disable it if it doesn't make sense for your program.

            Resume was in KDE3, and to the best of my knowledge KDE4 supports it; all KDE programs benefited from it, and even a few non-KDE programs. Considering how broad KDE was, KDE/GNU/Linux should qualify as an "operating system." You may disagree, but then the argument boils down to "what constitutes an OS?"

            No, it doesn't. You can't handwave away the differences by playing word games. It doesn't matter if you want to call it an OS or a Desktop Environment (hmm... I wonder what the two letters after "K" originally stood for?), the point is simple:

            1. KDE does not have the same resume feature that Lion has. Not e

        • They are implemented in such a way that every. single. person. who uses a computer can make use of them.

          You simultaneously underestimate and overestimate the human race, which is a bit odd.

          You overestimate them in that you've actually (with emphasis) said that every person who uses a computer can use this -- trivially false. Aside from people who cannot practically justify having a Mac (and thus cannot run the OS, let alone use it), there are the people who learn this stuff by rote, who will refuse to learn a new interface, no matter how shiny, if there is any possible way they can hang on to their old interf

          • by node 3 (115640)

            They are implemented in such a way that every. single. person. who uses a computer can make use of them.

            You simultaneously underestimate and overestimate the human race, which is a bit odd.

            You overestimate them in that you've actually (with emphasis) said that every person who uses a computer can use this -- trivially false. Aside from people who cannot practically justify having a Mac (and thus cannot run the OS, let alone use it), there are the people who learn this stuff by rote, who will refuse to learn a new interface, no matter how shiny, if there is any possible way they can hang on to their old interface and habits.

            I'm not sure what you are reading, but I'm stating that these features are implemented in such a way that anyone can use them. Your first "point" is just plain stupid. Of course you have to have a computer that runs Lion to use features of Lion. I find it impossible to believe you actually think I meant that even people on Windows, or without a computer at all, can use these features.

            Your second point shows no understanding of how these features work. Two of them require no alteration in interaction whatsoe

      • by Ixokai (443555)

        You have? Name one.

        You may have seen applications that implemented the features in question -- but that's a very different thing then an OS (including desktop environments, like Gnome or KDE) providing it as a part of their API/frameworks for everything to make use of, in a consistent way across all of their apps.

          • Resume and Autosave? In KDE.
          • Versioning? Dates all the way back to ITS.
          • by Ixokai (443555)

            Let's see.

            Resume? Where? If you're going to point at Hibernate, that's not resume as far as I'm aware. Resume is a per-application thing (though surely you can restart all) -- its less about dumping RAM to disk then letting each app suspend/restore its state automatically: its more like the iOS suspend/resume / fast application restart/switching then anything else.

            Cuz, if I load up my Kubuntu and start messing around, and I can't find a single application that sports any kind of state resuming besides the c

            • Well, I should be more clear: I am thinking back to KDE3 (you might be using KDE4?). When I was using KDE3, I could get resume functionality with kedit/kate, konqueror, koffice, quanta, and even a few non-KDE applications that had opened files through KIO. Likewise, relevant KDE3 applications -- kedit/kate, koffice, quanta, etc. -- all had autosave functionality.

              As I said, versioning in the filesystem itself was a feature of ITS before Apple was even incorporated as a company. Theoretically you could
    • Wondering if this is on/because of zfs or some other filesystem change from HFS+.

    • by jo42 (227475)

      Autosave, Version and Resume are major improvements, and long overdue for desktop OSes.

      Do not want. Do not need.

  • I'm a huge Apple fan, but even I think this stuff with the "i" branding is just stupid and faintly embarrassing. Every Apple product has a fraeking "i" before it's otherwise utterly unimaginative name? "iCloud" - FFS.

  • "iCloud... When it is down, that is actually a feature."
  • by redemtionboy (890616) on Tuesday May 31, 2011 @04:30PM (#36301264)

    My biggest hope is that they'll finally announce their back to school sale and it will be a free iPad instead of an iPod this time around, as to one up Microsoft with the free Xbox360.

    • I've been checking every day for that back to school sale. I'm finally cutting Microsoft off after 30 too many blue screens in Windows 7 (but Ubuntu manages to run just fine); yeah, I know, it's a driver issue (probably) but after many hours of working on the computer, it's not worth my time to figure out the issue. Apple will not give away iPads but they might give $200 discounts on them.
  • by obarthelemy (160321) on Tuesday May 31, 2011 @04:39PM (#36301358)

    Given how Apple likes to actually announce stuff at their shindigs, either they are priming us for a relatively empty one, or they have big news that will overshadow all that. Apart from them taking over Sony, I don't see what could be THAT big, though.

    • The iNotebook, of course: an iPad which has a foldable keyboard, thus giving you all the benefits of a laptop while still allowing you to run iOS. It will have the ability to swivel the screen around, and fold it over the keyboard to give you a convenient tablet form factor, so you can just use the touch screen if you want. A historic first!

      </sarcasm>
    • Bringing back the XServe ? No one expects it to happen, so that'd be pretty big.

      They're about due for refresh on both the Mini and MacPro, so they might have something else there. I'd personally be happy with an i5 or i7 Mini ... or a smaller chassis for the MacPro and redundant power, so we have something that's not crap for using as a server.

      • I doubt we'll see the XServe (or similar) back. But the announcement did mention that, basically, MacOS X Lion is the server version of MacOS X. It doesn't explicitly say so, but this must mean that there is no longer a separate server version of MacOS. Which is good news, because the server tools were already pretty decent (but too expensive) when I last used them, two versions ago.

    • by node 3 (115640)

      Given how Apple likes to actually announce stuff at their shindigs, either they are priming us for a relatively empty one, or they have big news that will overshadow all that. Apart from them taking over Sony, I don't see what could be THAT big, though.

      Um... They outlined exactly what they are going to show off.

      iOS 5
      iCloud
      Lion

      These are all big, newsworthy things. The only thing that can be disappointing is if none of these will be available during June.

    • by Ixokai (443555)

      Relatively empty one? I doubt it -- because for the first time that I can remember, they also made a point to reach out to reporters of the non-tech-blog sort and suggest they would be interested in attending.

      But, they've also been saying pretty firmly there won't be any new hardware released at WWDC, which is unusual. (Not unprecedented, but unusual). I think the extremely unusual (and I think unprecedented, but I don't feel like fact-checking) announcement of some of the stuff that will be there -- and th

  • It's always " I ! I ! I ! Me ! Me ! Me ! "

    selfish bastards.
  • i-Caramba!
  • by mr_lizard13 (882373) on Tuesday May 31, 2011 @06:03PM (#36302268)
    They've cleverly given everything away, without actually giving anything away. The music streaming service was known about anyway, and every site had reported on the music labels being signed up. So on the one hand, confirming iCloud exists has given nothing further away than what the public knew already.

    But at the same time we still have no idea just now big iCloud will be. Could it be more than just music (I reckon yes). Will it be a replacement for MobileMe (fair chance). Might it include some iWork comparability (I wouldn't put it past them).

    These are questions which were being asked last year, last month, and last week - and following this announcement today they are still questions we don't know the answers to.
  • by FunnyStrange (974343) on Tuesday May 31, 2011 @07:15PM (#36302916)
    Not seeing this upthread, but might be redundant by now: The iWork announcement was for the "small" iOS devices (iPhone and iPod Touch). Those apps have been available for iPad (also iOS) for over a year. The update makes them universal. If you own them for iPad, they'll now work on the other devices (it's a free upgrade).
    • by am 2k (217885)

      I already tried it and it works fine, but I'm a bit stumped at why the hell I'd want to create a presentation on an iPhone??? It's already a bit of a kludge on the iPad.

      The biggest new feature in Keynote is that you can connect an Keynote Remote to it now. That means you can remote control your iPad from your iPhone in presentations! Even better, the reverse also works, you can remote control your iPhone that's hooked to a beamer via an iPad (or another iPhone/iPod touch). WHY????

    • by theurge14 (820596)

      I wouldn't exactly call it "universal" if I have to re-purchase Numbers for my iPhone when I already bought it on my Mac.

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