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Portables (Apple) Apple Hardware

New Apple MacBook Pro Reviewed 627

Posted by timothy
from the not-yer-daddy's-laptop dept.
adeelarshad82 writes "As fate would have it, an Intel chipset glitch delayed shipments of almost every laptop manufacturer, save one. Apple, which has typically been last in transitioning to new technology, is now among the first to launch laptops with Sandy Bridge. The Apple MacBook Pro (Thunderbolt) is the fastest laptop out there. Powered with a Quad-core Core i7 processor and AMD Radeon HD 6750M, the MacBook Pro has a lot of fire power to offer. Unfortunately though it is still a bit expensive and there is a lack of Thunderbolt devices to take advantage of the new interface."
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New Apple MacBook Pro Reviewed

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  • Uh oh (Score:2, Insightful)

    by clang_jangle (975789)

    Apple, which has typically been last in transitioning to new technology

    It's bad news when TFS is a troll.

    • Re:Uh oh (Score:4, Insightful)

      by PCM2 (4486) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @08:39PM (#35327228) Homepage

      Yeah, no kidding. This would be the Apple that invented Firewire, right? The Apple that brought networking to casual PC users? The Apple that killed off the floppy drive? The Apple that was first to trade old-school serial ports for USB? The Apple that was first to embrace 802.11b wireless? The Apple that was the first manufacturer to ship systems with Nehalem chips? I could do a Google search for "Apple was the first manufacturer" but what would be the point? That one sentence is so ludicrously off base, it makes me not want to read another word.

      • Re:Uh oh (Score:5, Informative)

        by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @08:56PM (#35327340) Journal
        Yes and no...

        Apple is typically very aggressive about killing legacy things in favor of whatever new hotness they have decided on, even when customers whine about it, and they have recently been Intel's shiny launch partner of choice(so there is usually a short period of exclusivity for Intel's new hotness). They are also pretty aggressive about deciding that some feature should be 'baseline' rather than 'upgrade' at a relatively early date(this shows up with things like bluetooth today, or 802.11b back when that was optional on nastier PC laptops...) That is the yes.

        The "no" is that Firewire was pretty much the last hardware standard that Apple had a major hand in. USB? Appeared on PC motherboards well before Apple ones(it was Intel's baby after all), Apple was just the first to burn the legacy options. 802.11b? All of Apple's 1st gen gear was rebadged Lucent off-the shelf stuff. Apple made it an available consumer option while Lucent was still squeezing the enterprise guys; but that was pure sticker engineering? Killed off the floppy? The first to stop offering it across the board, possibly; but you've been able to spec PCs without floppies well back into Apple's beige era. 64bit desktops? Hello AMD, 3D cards? Apple's selections are always archaic, even now that they are an Intel shop. etc, etc.

        By virtue of their disinterest in coddling legacy users and low price points, Apple does, certainly, come up a lot on the "pushed technology X into ubiquity within their product line by murdering its predecessors and making it a standard option" list. However, the list of "was actually first" is substantially shorter, especially in more recent years. The list of "invented here, rather than launch partnered here" is shorter still, especially these days.

        They undoubtedly do adopt-and-polish quite well; but their actual degree of pioneering needs to be kept in perspective.
        • Re:Uh oh (Score:5, Insightful)

          by nedlohs (1335013) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @10:03PM (#35327678)

          The claim was "last in transitioning to new technology".

          Just adding the new technology and keeping the old isn't transitioning. Apple has often been first in dumping the old and hence first to transition - though really it's been due to them being small enough and being the monopoly producer so that they could much more easily. If Dell decided to make some of those changes a big chunk of their customers would just buy from HP instead, for example.

        • Thread creep (Score:3, Insightful)

          by tgibbs (83782)

          Interesting how the thread topic has slipped. When the initial criticism, "Apple...has typically been last in transitioning to new technology" was pointed out to be not merely false, but flagrantly so (Apple not only has not been last, but in terms of transitioning, they have tended to lead the pack in abandoning old tech), those looking for some excuse to pick on Apple pretend that the question was whether whether Apple was first to use new technology.

        • Re:Uh oh (Score:4, Informative)

          by shaper (88544) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @11:24PM (#35328152) Homepage

          USB? Appeared on PC motherboards well before Apple ones(it was Intel's baby after all), Apple was just the first to burn the legacy options.

          USB was an obscure curiosity when Apple aggressively adopted it in the original Bondi blue iMac. I clearly remember watching the market for USB peripherals be completely driven by demand from iMac (and then other Apple model) owners at a time when PC users stayed away from the technology because it was incompatible with all their PS2, serial and parallel port peripherals. Often the place to find USB equipment was in the Apple section in stores.

          802.11b? All of Apple's 1st gen gear was rebadged Lucent off-the shelf stuff.

          This one I remember very well. Apple spearheaded the consumer wireless market with the introduction of the $299 Airport "UFO" wireless hub. I had wanted wireless for a while but couldn't afford it. The only other options were all so far above that first Airport price point that it was a shock to the market. The other thing Apple did to lead in consumer wireless was to make it an option in all their computers, especially in laptops, and then a standard option that you had to de-select and finally as an unremovable feature.

          Killed off the floppy? The first to stop offering it across the board, possibly; but you've been able to spec PCs without floppies well back into Apple's beige era.

          Maybe so, but no sane PC user did back in those days. The floppy ruled the PC data storage and transfer world well past the point when Apple users had moved on to other technologies. It took forever for PC USB boot support to be common enough to supplant the ubiquitous PC admin's emergency boot floppy.

          Everything you have said is technically true but misses the whole story. Sure, Apple didn't invent the technologies you mention but Apple's influence was instrumental in getting early adoption going and building markets for them.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by gad_zuki! (70830)

        Err, Apple also brought us the one button mouse, fought USB as long as it could, and everytime I go to a meeting someone yells "anyone got a displayport adapter to vga so I can use this projector?" Not to mention some of us still need serial ports on our computers, but I guess that's beside the point.

        Not to mention PC makers have had the option to not install the floppy years before Apple mandated it. That AMD really brought us into the 64 bit era, and that wifi was not at all an Apple thing. Or that I ca

        • Re:Uh oh (Score:4, Informative)

          by Low Ranked Craig (1327799) on Sunday February 27, 2011 @01:22AM (#35328650)

          I'm sorry, but this

          fought USB as long as it could

          is demonstrably false.

          USB 1.1 was the first iteration of USB that was actually widely implemented by a lot of manufacturers. It was introduced in September of 1998, however the original iMac was released August 15th 1998 with USB 1.1 ports as the sole method of hooking up the keyboard and mouse as well as an additional USB port. The mouse plugs into the keyboard which uses one of the ports. Please explain how Apple shipping their brand new line of computers with USB 1.1 as the sole method of hooking up a couple of required peripherals 3 weeks before it's official release equates to "fighting USB as long as they could", especially since I remember buying Dells in the early 2000's that still shipped with PS2 mice and keyboards. I still have the iMac and some of the Dells lying around here someplace...

          If you want to rag on someone because you think they're a fanboy, fine, but get your facts straight.

    • Re:Uh oh (Score:4, Insightful)

      by drsmithy (35869) <.moc.liamg. .ta. .yhtimsrd.> on Saturday February 26, 2011 @09:02PM (#35327366)

      It's bad news when TFS is a troll.

      Seems pretty accurate to me. Most new technology (eg: CPUs, GPUs, memory types, etc) are on the market for months (at least) before Apple picks them up. They tend to keep older technology around for longer, as well (eg: Mac Mini still has a Core 2 Duo).

      The rare counter-examples (eg: Firewire, Mini-DP) are rarely found outside of the Mac ecosystem.

      That's before even going into the technology other vendors have that they stubbornly refuse to implement. Like, say, a docking station for their ostensibly "professional" laptops.

      • by lyinhart (1352173)
        I don't know why this was modded as flamebait. It's a sound, rational observation. Apple updates their PC lines about once a year and by that time, the tech they feature in their refresh has been on the market for months. It's not a necessarily a bad thing either - by the time Apple starts production, most of the early problems have been ironed out. And Apple is able to cram it all into a pretty looking, unibody case with an integrated, sharp display.
        • Re:Uh oh (Score:4, Informative)

          by beelsebob (529313) on Sunday February 27, 2011 @04:06AM (#35329176)

          Because the observation is incorrect – apple tend to launch their new lines just as new parts become available – just as they've done here. With the original Core architecture, apple were releasing machines exactly as intel released the CPUs. Same with Core2, same with the Santa Rosa chipsets for them, okay Core i7 they were a bit slow on, but that was because of the mess with nVidia and chipsets (which incidentally, nVidia made *specially* for apple, and then released later as ion). And finally, with the MacBook Air, apple got intel to produce an entire new packaging for their CPUs just to fit in apple's laptop.

          I dunno about you, but being the first out, or at very least one of the first, with all but one of the major upgrades is hardly what I'd call being consistently the last to transition.

      • When you look at Apple's tech support it is really scattershot. Some things they jump right on, and force people in to before it is ready. USB is a great example. It was real early in the development cycle, peripherals were starting to appear but it was still ramping up. Apple forced it as the only solution and made everyone deal with it.

        However other things, like the C2D in the Mac Mini, which is now one of your only options for a server, they lag behind. With the release of Sandy Bridge that is two full g

        • Usually, there's a practical or strategic reason for these things - even if you don't agree with that reason. Apple don't want to introduce Blu-ray because they're trying to ditch the optical drive anyway (...besides, the only place I want to watch 1080p movies is my living-room TV, and flash or external HD is better for backup).

          However other things, like the C2D in the Mac Mini,

          ...which is there because of the spat between Intel and Nvidia meaning that there were no Nvidia chipsets for the Core i, and the Mini and 13" MacBook Pro didn't have space for a di

  • by rekoil (168689) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @08:34PM (#35327190)

    I can't imagine how Macbook shipments would be affected, given the flaw only affected SATA ports beyond the first two. Presuming that SATA devices linked through Thunderbolt don't count either.

    • There was a previous article that made Slashdot to the effect that Intel had, at the request of certain unnamed customers(clearly including, though not necessarily limited to) Apple, resumed shipping the flawed P67 chips on the condition that they be used only in products where the 4 affected ports would be irrelevant.

      Speculation at the time was, as seemed logical, that this was basically a reflection of the fact that all the OEMs didn't want to hold up their laptop releases for something that basically
      • by drsmithy (35869)

        Speculation at the time was, as seemed logical, that this was basically a reflection of the fact that all the OEMs didn't want to hold up their laptop releases for something that basically only affected desktops and huge DTR beasts.

        Most PC laptops these days have at least 3 SATA ports on them (internal HDD, internal optical, eSATA).

        • That is pretty common; but the eSATA port seems to show up in eSATA/USB "eSATAp" form. As best I can tell, you can get USB connectors that will fill exactly the same board holes as eSATAp connectors, just not making contact with the SATA signal lines. It means dropping a bullet point; but it makes redesign a snap if you don't mind doing so. If you do mind, you'd have to do the slightly more costly work of putting a third party controller or port multiplier on board.

          I don't know which way any individual o
          • by drsmithy (35869)

            If you do mind, you'd have to do the slightly more costly work of putting a third party controller or port multiplier on board.

            It might not be just costly, it might be impossible. I can't imagine there's a lot of board space left in a 12" laptop.

            Basically, Apple is getting the jump on everyone else because they offer fewer features.

          • As best I can tell, you can get USB connectors that will fill exactly the same board holes as eSATAp connectors, just not making contact with the SATA signal lines

            Of course how much that helps depends on which ports they chose to use for internal functionality and which for the eSATAp port.

  • A BIT expensive?! (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Shivetya (243324) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @08:34PM (#35327192) Homepage Journal

    It costs $2199 which for many means an additional $150 for the screen resolution it should have as default. Worse that $150 is the only way to get a non-glossy screen. So lets just say 2349 to get off the ground. Want a three year warranty? Considering your down 2349 its worth it to pay off the risk of that, but at 349 its 15% of the cost of the laptop.

    Then you can go on with the extras beyond those two requirements. Sorry, in a day when you can buy a laptop for under 399 these premium laptops are absurd. I know you get what you pay for, but you really don't. The price difference stops somewhere well south of this things price point. This is like saying you need a Porsche for your commute because parking at Starbucks in a Chevy is so not your perceived status.

    Don't get me wrong, I have an iMac, but I can at least see some of the value in its 27 inch screen. I can't find the value in their laptops. I know other companies make expensive laptops but damn, there are near equivalents for 90% of the apps most people will run for half this price let alone a quarter.

    Amazing laptops in the range of workstation prices (looking at the real Mac Pros - the tower units).

    • by znu (31198) <znu.public@gmail.com> on Saturday February 26, 2011 @08:48PM (#35327290)

      Do some people buy MacBook Pros as status symbols? I'm sure they do. But some of us work in pro video. There are people who legitimately need high-end laptops, and a lot of them, because of Apple's strength in the creative pro market, use Macs.

      With quad core processors and tons of external bandwidth over Thunderbolt, these new MBPs are game changing for pro video, or will be once a couple of TB devices hit the market. For instance, TB is fast enough to hook up both a RAID capable of handling multiple 1080p video streams and a video interface capable of doing uncompressed HD output to a broadcast monitor. This makes these pretty much the first laptops ever (outside of crazy hack jobs, maybe) that can plausibly replace towers for working with uncompressed HD video formats. That's pretty handy.

      • by drsmithy (35869)

        With quad core processors and tons of external bandwidth over Thunderbolt, these new MBPs are game changing for pro video, or will be once a couple of TB devices hit the market. For instance, TB is fast enough to hook up both a RAID capable of handling multiple 1080p video streams and a video interface capable of doing uncompressed HD output to a broadcast monitor. This makes these pretty much the first laptops ever (outside of crazy hack jobs, maybe) that can plausibly replace towers for working with uncom

        • by PCM2 (4486)

          If you're going to be chained to a RAID array, why would you use a laptop when an equivalent desktop is going to be around twice as fast ?

          Portability, obviously. It's a lot easier to take a laptop and a RAID box out in the field than to carry around a desktop, keyboard, mouse, monitor, monitor cables, power cables, speakers, etc.

        • by smash (1351)
          Because you can take the laptop with you once you've finished dealing with streaming uncompressed content to the array?
        • The idea is not to be chained to the RAID array. Get some work done with the RAID array, copy the file over to the laptop and take it over to the client's place for demonstration. Sure, you could also do the same with a desktop and a laptop in combination, but having a single device saves a fair bit of overlap.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      Sorry, in a day when you can buy a laptop for under 399 these premium laptops are absurd. I know you get what you pay for, but you really don't.

      How much does that $399 laptop weigh? How thick is it? How long is the battery life?

      Have you noticed that the manufacturers of those $399 laptops also sell much more expensive laptops that, at least by the very narrow logic you seem to be following, don't spec out any higher? Do you ever criticize those, or are they given immunity because they aren't of Apple manufacture?

      Apple simply doesn't try to compete in the 2-inch thick, 9-pound, short-battery-life segment of the laptop market. Not everyone carries ab

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by msauve (701917)

        Apple simply doesn't try to compete in the 2-inch thick, 9-pound, short-battery-life segment of the laptop market. ... my first laptop was one of those 2-inch thick, 9-pound, short-battery-life beasts

        Was that the Apple Powerbook 540c (2.3" thick, 7.3 lbs, not counting the power supply)?

      • Re:A BIT expensive?! (Score:5, Informative)

        by RzUpAnmsCwrds (262647) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @09:59PM (#35327658)

        Apple simply doesn't try to compete in the 2-inch thick, 9-pound, short-battery-life segment of the laptop market. Not everyone carries about weight or size - but some of us do.

        You're just making up numbers. The only " 2-inch thick, 9-pound" laptops are 17" beasts designed for gaming, and they don't cost $399. Most of the 399 laptops are in the 5 to 6 lb range and are about 1.25in thick. Most of them have reasonable battery life too, at least 4 hours.

        How about this? You can get a ThinkPad T410 for under $1000 with an i5 and 6 hour battery life that weighs less than 5 lbs.

        I'm about to buy a T420s, which will cost around $1300 with a Sandy Bridge i5 and a higher resolution display than the 15" MacBook Pro. And it's thinner. And it weighs almost 2lbs less.

        There is no getting around the fact that Apple's laptops are very, very expensive.

        The build quality / durability argument doesn't hold because top-tier business laptops (ThinkPad T-series, EliteBook, Latitude E-series) now go for under $1000 and most have passed MIL Spec tests for vibration/drops/dust/etc (which the MacBook has not).

        The performance argument doesn't hold because PCs and Macs now use the same Intel chipsets and CPUs, so the performance is the same.

        The weight/size argument doesn't hold because you can get PCs with the same performance that are as small and light as the MacBook Pro - or in some cases lighter and smaller. The ThinkPad T420s is lighter (by almost a pound) and thinner than the MacBook Pro 13 and it has the same Sandy Bridge dual-core CPUs.

        So we're left with the OS, the design, and some other features like a higher-contrast-ratio LCD. If you are willing to pay more for that, that's your decision. But stop trying to pretend that you aren't paying a big premium for those features.

        You're buying the PC equivalent of a a Lexus. Yes, it's nicer than the Toyota that costs half as much. It's not twice as nice, though. And trying to pretend that it's somehow justified from a value standpoint is stupid.

        • by beelsebob (529313) on Sunday February 27, 2011 @04:15AM (#35329210)

          How about this? You can get a ThinkPad T410 for under $1000 with an i5 and 6 hour battery life that weighs less than 5 lbs.

          Comparing the most $969 (on sale – it's usually $1405, significantly more than the mac) T410 to the 13" MacBook Pro:
            Slower CPU (yes, it may be clocked higher, but sandy bridge more than offsets that).
            Slower GPU (yes, even the discrete NVS3100m is slower than the HD 3000 – you can check various benchmark sites for that).
            Half the RAM
            Half the HDD space
            Shorter (though not much) battery life.
            Much worse trackpad
            No thunderbolt

          The performance argument doesn't hold because PCs and Macs now use the same Intel chipsets and CPUs, so the performance is the same.

          Incorrect –the Mac is using a Sandy Bridge i7, the T410 isn't – this is the same kind of performance difference as between a Core2Duo and a Core i7 – Sandy bridge is a complete new architecture.

          So basically, you're saying "zomg it's $200 cheaper", when it's got $200 less in it...

    • Oh come on, there's plenty of people who think that Apple's laptops are a bargain.

      Back in 2002, I paid over $3000 for a top of the line BTO Powerbook G4 800MHz, with 256MB RAM and 60GB hard drive. (After my student discount) Today, the top of the line MacBook Pro is $600 cheaper. Dell's top Alienware laptop is $3500.

    • Re:A BIT expensive?! (Score:5, Informative)

      by daver00 (1336845) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @09:05PM (#35327390)

      The thing is, at the entry level, Macbook Pros are actually extremely good value. Before I go on I'll just note that I'm far from an Apple fanboy and I live in Australia where prices are less than optimal. Now the lowest spec 13" MBP is $1200 ($1400 in AU), for that you get cpu performance equal to that of the previous generation (2010 model) 17" MBP, you get an extremely well crafted enclosure with a nice design in a portable form factor. I have been shopping around for a new laptop and for me the key points were: small, light, attractive, powerful. My options were basically Vaio, Dell XPS studio, HP Envy or Macbook Pro. The MBP was cheaper than all the other options with the nicest design (Australian market here, prices differ quite dramatically). Apple also offer me a student discount, and a free iPod.

      I don't like Apple, I really don't (I DO however very much like their industrial design), but I shopped around for a long time and the MBP came up as the best value laptop within my reach. I could have gone down and bought some ugly thick plastic fantastic with better specs for less, but as I said it was crucial to me to have a nice design and a slim package. I'll grant that the MBP cost does not scale well with options, particularly if you opt for alterations when you buy. That said I think I've scored a ridiculously good deal, I'll be installing my own SSD and expect that to reap far more performance gains than bumping up the CPU (at $300 premium no less).

      FWIW I was looking at the 14" HP Envy for $2400, the Vaio Z at $3000, or the MBP 13" at $1270 with a free iPod, these are Australian prices.

      • by Sancho (17056) *

        Correct me if I'm wrong, but the Vaio Z and the Envy both have significantly better graphics cards than the current 13" MBP, right?

        Also, Sony is pretty well regarded as having vastly overpriced laptops.

  • ..."Apple is rumored to have an exclusive on this technology until 2012."

    *shakes head* So much for wide support. Lots more people buy Mac then they used to, but 8 times as many people still buy PCs. Peripheral vendors aren't stupid.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 26, 2011 @08:42PM (#35327252)

      A rumor that Intel quickly denied. Others can support it, Apple was just first. The original statement was to the effect it'd probably be about a year before others would support it, because it would require new hardware, etc.

    • by Jezza (39441)

      The thing is Apple buyers do spend more on their kit than PC buyers (there is variation - I'm talking "on average"). So if you're making some pricey device you are likely to find that a disproportionate number of your customers are Mac owners. Now if you're going to tell me that you won't see devices with ONLY a Thunderbolt port - I'd agree with you. There are plenty of peripheral makers who make most of their money from Apple owners (LaCie spring to mind).

      Plus this is a rumour, it may not be true. I actual

    • If it's a better standard -- and it looks like it is -- then others will adopt it, too.

      Mac was first with FireWire. It became a standard and others hopped on the bandwagon. Sure, USB eventually won out, but that was arguably a VHS/BetaMax situation... FireWire had definite advantages that were seldom exploited by users or even the industry (like the ability to link 2 devices via FireWire without using a computer as the go-between).

      Mac was first with DisplayPort. Sure, their connector (Mini-DisplayPort
  • The most important question: Can you get one in black? Aluminum is getting a bit tired. :-)
    • Yes, they are overdue for a redesign. In my case, support expires this year on my wife's late-2008 Macbook. I suggested upgrading but she has no interest. Her reason? The new Macbook looks almost exactly like her old Macbook. So her old computer still "feels" new.

      This has gotta be bad for Apple. The lack of cosmetic design changes is going to cause a lot of their users to not-upgrade and stick to old hardware, which is also more likely to be running old versions of OS X. By not changing their unib
  • by QuantumBeep (748940) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @08:46PM (#35327278)

    I'm no Mac fanboy. I'd probably attract criticism for being a Mac hater. In any case, I think some negatives are just unfair.

    TFS says that Light Peak doesn't have peripherals yet, and paints this as a negative on the MacBook Pro. Why do all reviewers feel a compulsion to make up shit if they can't think of anything negative? That's like some video game reviews I've seen, where they can' t find anything to complain about, so they take a star off because they just don't like the genre. That's a good reason to fire a reviewer, in my opinion.

    • by Haedrian (1676506)

      Well, I wouldn't call it a negative unless its replacing some other more important component (like giving it less USB drives or whatever), but if you have a socket which has nothing to plug in yet - and which Apple are pushing forward/banking that it becomes popular and doesn't bomb - then its pretty useless if it fails. Of course if you have unlimited space, no complaint - but I always get the idea that they removed a USB to shove it in or something.

      Can't find a USB count in the article, may have missed it

      • by Jane Q. Public (1010737) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @09:20PM (#35327466)
        Except that isn't the case here. Thunderbolt uses effectively the same connector as the Mini DisplayPort. So if you don't have any other TB peripherals, you just plug your monitor in there.

        It was announced that LightPeak will use a compatible connector with, I suppose, a fiber connection embedded in it somewhere. But otherwise the connector is the same.

        Apple has done similar things before. My older MacBook Pro, for example, has fiber-optic connections embedded in the 2.5mm Line In and Headphone jacks. I don't know of many people who have made use of the fiber connectors for sound, but they are there, nevertheless.
      • There will be 3 on the MacBook Pro, I don't know about other models. That is the same number as existing MacBook Pros.
  • Not hardly. A 2.2GHz, Intel Core i7-2720QM isn't close to as fast as the Core i7 960 in my laptop.

    • It's closer than you think because of architectural improvements. The i7-2820QM is around the same performance as an i7-920. So your i7-960 is probably about 20-30% faster.

  • by unassimilatible (225662) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @08:54PM (#35327332) Journal
    And whose girlfriend has a race-to-the-bottom HP laptop, both of which are paperweights, I'm willing to pay a little more for my next laptop, one made by a company whose business model isn't razor-thin margins and cheap-as-possible components, and slipshod engineering. Go do a search of the laptop forums for "Dell Inspiron," a horrendously flawed design, and see the hate. Then go look at the customer satisfaction ratings for Macs.

    My next lappy will be a Mac, and I can use Boot Camp when I need Windows.

    There's a difference between cheap and value.
    • by Pulzar (81031)

      Bah, I can buy 3 decent laptops for the price of one of these.. by the time the first two die and I get the third, the third will be superior in specs in every way to this Mac Pro.

      You're not buying a nice suit, it's perfectly ok for it to not last long -- technology advances too fast for you to hang on to the same piece of electronics for years and years.

      • by smash (1351)
        If thats an option for you, go right ahead. I know i am fairly inconvenienced when shitty hardware dies on me when I'm in Mali or Kazakhstan for business, or somewhere actually nice whilst on holiday. I deal with busted computers day in day out at work, for my own use I want something that is going to give me as little grief as possible and am willing to pay for it.
      • technology advances too fast for you to hang on to the same piece of electronics for years and years.

        Technology might advance, but that doesn't mean needs do. For 80% of the people buying these things, the power of a laptop from 3 years ago is more than sufficient - a bit of document editing/spreadsheets, emails, internet, photos and the like and you're hardly likely to notice a change. From personal experience, many would prefer to have a laptop that doesn't break and goes along perfectly fine for 3 years rather than have to upgrade every 12 months.

        (posted from my 2008 MacBook Pro)

    • by russotto (537200) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @10:06PM (#35327692) Journal

      Go do a search of the laptop forums for "Dell Inspiron," a horrendously flawed design, and see the hate. Then go look at the customer satisfaction ratings for Macs.

      The parts falling off my Inspiron were of the very highest quality.

    • by Frangible (881728) on Sunday February 27, 2011 @01:20AM (#35328638)
      Yep-- I've owned a lot of cheap laptops, and laptops that weren't so cheap. My Fujitsus were made in Japan, and cost more than my 13" MBP... but surprisingly, the MBP is significantly better made out of superior materials.

      Another thing people overlook in laptops is the display. The brightness, contrast ratio, black levels, and color gamut on the Apple LCDs is vastly superior to almost everything else out there. I've seen a Dell with a better screen, but Dell discontinued that screen option shortly after it was introduced. And it's like that for all the high-end PC notebook screen options I've seen on Anandtech -- you can't actually buy them. While the TN LCD isn't amazing compared to the better S-PVA and IPS panels on desktop monitors, it's almost unequaled among notebooks.

      There's the little touches too, like the external LED battery check, the MagSafe power connector, backlit keyboard, glass touchpad, compact power supply, etc.

      You get what you pay for. A $1200 MBP is a lot better than two $600 budget laptops.
  • For me, one of the biggest letdowns of this new generation of Macbook Pros was the fact that the optical drive was still a necessity, there wasn't an option to swap out the optical drive with an SSD. Come on Apple, it's 2011, how many people actually use optical drives anymore, esp. on the go? External USB dvd burners are now a dime a dozen, there is no reason I need to carry one with me everywhere I go.
    • I forget the name of the company, but they make an adapter that takes the place of the optical drive, and houses a hard drive instead. Because the optical drive plugs into the same controller as the hard drive, the throughput is identical.

      I know someone who put his existing hard drive into one of those adapters, and installed an SSD where the original drive was. He raves about it.
  • by Greyfox (87712) on Saturday February 26, 2011 @10:20PM (#35327770) Homepage Journal
    My complaint with every Intel Mac I've purchased to date is they get too damn hot, even if you take matters into your own hands and spin the fans up to max. Then their video cards melt. I had three burn out in my last Mac Pro desktop. The current one is still hanging in there, but the exhaust is still pretty warm. I haven't had a Mac Pro laptop video card burn out, but the video card in my Mac Pro is also woefully underpowered. I also haven't experienced third degree penis burns, but I'm pretty sure that's because I put a book on my lap when using the laptop.
  • by Otis_INF (130595) on Sunday February 27, 2011 @06:09AM (#35329516) Homepage

    The reviewer doesn't even enlist the glossyness of the screen. If you look at reviews over at notebookcheck.net, you'll see this review is just 'lame'. A laptop is taken outside, how does it behave under conditions with a lot of light (even indoors)? Stuff a buyer would want to know.

    Ok, maybe not a mac-user, but still.

If I have seen farther than others, it is because I was standing on the shoulders of giants. -- Isaac Newton

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