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Apple Changes Stance On Water Damage Policy 155

Posted by Soulskill
from the customer-is-occasionally-right dept.
tekgoblin writes "It appears Apple has changed its stance on whether an iOS device is actually water damaged. If you remember when the 13-year-old girl sued Apple in December, it was because her iPhone's moisture sensors had gone off and Apple voided her warranty. Those sensors have also been triggered by simply exposing the phone to low temperatures. Now Apple says that if the moisture sensors are red but the customer disputes and says no liquid has come into contact with the device, the warranty may still apply."
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Apple Changes Stance On Water Damage Policy

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  • Unreliable (Score:5, Insightful)

    by amicusNYCL (1538833) on Monday January 31, 2011 @06:59PM (#35061480)

    Now Apple says that if the moisture sensors are red but the customer disputes and says no liquid has come into contact with the device, the warranty may still apply.

    In other words, the sensors are unreliable.

  • Translation (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MightyMartian (840721) on Monday January 31, 2011 @07:02PM (#35061512) Journal

    Translation: Our useless sensor is about to lead us into nasty litigation that will likely void our warranty-evasion scheme, so we better open the door a little bit.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 31, 2011 @07:04PM (#35061532)

    Because it used to allow Apple to reject a warranty claim when they should honor it...mainly because they could BS their way into saying they were infallible before all of this... It's all about the Benjamins, you know.

  • Escape clause (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Lead Butthead (321013) on Monday January 31, 2011 @07:05PM (#35061538) Journal

    the warranty may still apply

    In other words, nothing has changed; it is still at their sole discretion if they wishes to honor the warranty.

  • Re:Escape clause (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MoonBuggy (611105) on Monday January 31, 2011 @07:26PM (#35061734) Journal

    No, something has changed. Previously a tripped moisture sensor would be grounds for an immediately voided warranty, now they'll take other points into account (presumably including, but not limited to, whether there is any other evidence of liquid damage, how convincing the customer's story is, how good a mood the manager is in that day, how attractive the customer is, how much fuss the customer kicks up, and the proximity of that day's lunch break).

  • by c0lo (1497653) on Monday January 31, 2011 @07:29PM (#35061754)

    Troll.

    As if Apple was the only one using those things.

    Failure.
    As if others doing the same make this "same" more ethical.

  • by NFN_NLN (633283) on Monday January 31, 2011 @08:25PM (#35062248)

    "I'm a cellphone tech at one of the US Big 4" ---

    Guess what -20C is BAD for your electronics.

    My data center is held at constant temperature and humidity for electronics. I DON'T intend to stay in a data center to use a phone. In Alberta, Canada it routinely gets to -30C (as it did this morning in fact) and I expect the phone to work. Did I say, after it thaws out? No I meant in -30C weather.

    You know what's BAD for a car engine? -30C
    You know what's BAD for plastic? -30C
    You know what's BAD for plants and animals? -30C

    Sure its not good but it should still work.

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