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Iphone Apple Hardware

iPhone 4 Screens Break 82% More Than 3GS 348

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the not-that-kind-of-crack dept.
A surprising number of readers have submitted linkage to a story discussing a recently released study that proclaims that iPhone 4 glass breaks way more often than the 3GS's. Although the chart that I found more surprising was the one that said almost 9% of iPhone 3GS screens crack after a year.
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iPhone 4 Screens Break 82% More Than 3GS

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  • Causality? (Score:5, Funny)

    by BigJClark (1226554) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:14PM (#33876902)

    Probably due to the fact that people slam the phone down 82% more of the time, because of the antenna reception issue.

    Just saying.. :)
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Nikker (749551)
      Just don't slam it like that!
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anubis IV (1279820)
      Actually, while unrelated to what you said, causality has me curious as well after reading these statistics. I just upgraded from an iPhone 3G (not 3GS) to an iPhone 4, and one of the first things I noticed was that the iPhone 4 is significantly more slippery in my hand than the older model. Whether that's a factor of it having a flat back compared to a curved one that contours to the hand better, or because of the use of glass as compared to plastic, I don't know, but it seems to me like I'm a lot more lik
  • by ScrewMaster (602015) * on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:15PM (#33876910)
    What the fuck do iPhone owners do with their phones? Crack open coconuts with them? I've been using cellular phones since they came in bags and ran off nicads and lead-acid batteries, and I have never managed to break a screen. I mean, sure, cell phones are portable electronics and thus delicate to a degree, but exercise a modicum of care and they should last a while.

    I think iPhone owners are one or more of the following: a. careless individuals who regularly drop their phones onto concrete, b. people who frequently beat on their phones out of frustration with Market policies and/or AT&T's network, or c. suckers that got sold an mechanically inferior product.

    There are other pigeonholes, but that'll get you started.
    • ...suckers that got sold an mechanically inferior product.

      Not to mention an grammatically dubious sentence ;)

    • Re:9% after a year? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by BasilBrush (643681) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:28PM (#33877036)

      9% annual accident rate implies one accident requiring an insurance claim in 11 years. Doesn't sound particularly high for an item that is so easily dropped.

      (Actually CmdrTaco can't read charts. That chart is nearly 8%, not nearly 9%. Which implies 13 years between claims.)

      • Re:9% after a year? (Score:4, Informative)

        by by (1706743) (1706744) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:36PM (#33877120)

        9% annual accident rate implies one accident requiring an insurance claim in 11 years.

        (1 - 0.09)^11 = 0.35...I think it implies that after 11 years, about 65% require insurance claims.

        • by Timmmm (636430)

          No, because when you claim on the insurance, you get another phone which can possibly break again. You're assuming once your phone breaks you don't get another one for the rest of the 11 years.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by newcastlejon (1483695)

      Could it have something to do with the fact your nicad-powered monster only had a screen ~1 sq. inch, coupled with the fact that it was (probably) some kind of impact-resistant plastic?

      iPhones - how I hate typing that - and newer phones have, big glass screens. Toughened or not it's a lot easier to crack a piece of glass than it is plastic that's 1/10th the size.

      For my two-penneth I'd say it's because we're used to them now; the novelty has worn off and we just aren't taking as much care of them as we used

      • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @07:06PM (#33877440)

        In particular the toughened stuff is that it is fairly brittle. So yes, it may well be stronger than plastic, but when it fails, it does so in a more catastrophic fashion.

        You can see this with knives. Most knives are steel, of course. However with a little research you discover you can buy more advanced, harder knives. Ceramic knives that more or less never go dull. They are the real deal too, I own a couple. You can't believe their sharpness, the hold their edge forever, food washes right off them, etc. Brilliant things. So why then are they not used all over? I mean they are pricey, but not much more than a forged steel knife.

        Reason is they are brittle. They are indeed much harder than steel, however they don't flex. So you apply pressure to them and they are unmoving until a certain point, when they shatter. A steel knife can bend and flex a bit, and be just fine. Mean that ultimately, a steel knife is much more resilient. They may lose their edge easier and so on, but they can do tough jobs ceramics can't (ceramic knives are for slicing, not for something lick carving meat on the bone).

        Same sort of shit here. A good polycarbonate will scratch easier than a toughened glass, and is less strong, you can flex it just by pushing hard enough. However it has a lot of give. It can take some reasonably hard impacts and survive, whereas the glass will hold strong up to a given point, and then fail badly.

        Max strength isn't always the most desirable characteristic. Surviving stresses can be as much about moving with them as resisting them.

        • by Timmmm (636430)

          Totally right, except that toughened glass is of course more tough (the opposite of brittle) than ordinary glass, not less.

      • by mjwx (966435)

        big glass screens

        There's the problem.

        Apple insists on building it out of glass, in case you dont remember back to high school physics, tensile strength vs hardness. Materials that are more tensile resist impact better because they can warp and spread the force of the impact over a large area. Hardness on the other hand does not resist impact very well because the impact of the force remains more localised.

        So plastic will bend because it is more tensile then glass, Glass will shatter because it's not

    • Re:9% after a year? (Score:5, Informative)

      by bloodhawk (813939) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:29PM (#33877054)
      sitting next to someone that is on his 3rd iphone due to screen breakage it is more how incredibly fragile they are rather than what they do with them. I saw him drop his once here at work onto the vinyl floor in the work kitchen and glass shattered, I have dropped my current HTC phone dozens of times, even on concrete a few times and besides the outer casing having a few scratches it is still perfect.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by PopeRatzo (965947) *

        sitting next to someone that is on his 3rd iphone

        There seem to be a lot of people who are on their 3rd or 4th iPhone. Some return them for various defects, where the guy at the Genius Bar just gives them a new phone instead of trying to trouble-shoot the problem, or there was some hardware issue.

        For a product that's only been out a few years, you wouldn't expect to see so many people go through 4 of them. On the other hand, my iPad Touch has been remarkably sturdy, though in its second year the battery cap

    • by sottitron (923868)
      You do realize that the entire face of every single model of iPhone is one plate of glass, right? Its not like a flip phone or candybar where the screen is embedded and behind a bezel that is 25% of the width/height of the phone on all sides.
      • Re: (Score:2, Offtopic)

        by PRMan (959735)
        My Samsung Moment Android phone also has one piece of glass. I recently dropped it on an asphalt parking lot while getting in my car, directly on the face at least 3-4 feet. It didn't break. It wasn't even scratched.
        • My Samsung Moment Android phone also has one piece of glass. I recently dropped it on an asphalt parking lot while getting in my car, directly on the face at least 3-4 feet. It didn't break. It wasn't even scratched.

          That may be, but I'm betting you went "oooohhhh ssshhhiiiittttt!!!!!!!!" in slooowwwww motion as the phone spun through the air and landed flat on its face. You were lucky there, I think: if it had hit on an angle you might have done more damage. But yeah, I don't consider Apple products to be particularly durable when compared to some, maybe even most, other smartphone makers. Don't know why: considering what they charge for the things you'd think they could use sturdier materials.

    • by interkin3tic (1469267) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:35PM (#33877100)

      What the fuck do iPhone owners do with their phones? Crack open coconuts with them?

      There's an app for that, yes.

    • by kevinNCSU (1531307) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:52PM (#33877276)

      What the fuck do iPhone owners do with their phones? Crack open coconuts with them?

      Try REALLY hard to shove their iPhone into their incredibly tight hipster jeans? ;)

      I actually own one, but I just couldn't resist.

      • by ScrewMaster (602015) * on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @07:02PM (#33877390)

        What the fuck do iPhone owners do with their phones? Crack open coconuts with them?

        Try REALLY hard to shove their iPhone into their incredibly tight hipster jeans? ;)

        I actually own one, but I just couldn't resist.

        Yes, and I appreciate that rarity of rarities ... an Apple owner with a sense of humor. Keep up the good work.

    • I don't even know what this "study" is trying to conclude.

      Our data shows that iPhone 4 owners are reporting accidents 68% more frequently than iPhone 3gs owners. 4.7% of iPhone 4 owners reported an accident to SquareTrade in the first 4 months of ownership, almost 70% higher than iPhone 3gs owners, 2.8% of whom had an accident over the same time period.

      OK, so what does that data mean? It looks like all the data shows is that, for whatever reason, there are a lot of "accidents" involving iPhone 4s. So, what does that mean? Does that mean people drop them more often? Would that be considered a "design flaw"? Are people dropping them just as often, but this model breaks more easily?

      I don't see any conclusions that can be drawn about this device just given the percentage of people who manage to sc

    • by Pop69 (700500)
      I broke the screen on my HTC Tytn 2

      I had it in my front pocket when I was out paintballing and it took one to the screen, can't think of any way I could break it in normal use.

      New screen cost me £35, cheaper than the insurance would have been if I'd taken it out
      • I broke the screen on my HTC Tytn 2 I had it in my front pocket when I was out paintballing and it took one to the screen, can't think of any way I could break it in normal use. New screen cost me £35, cheaper than the insurance would have been if I'd taken it out

        I'm waiting for the hero in some action movie to get shot and fall to the ground, only to pull out his smartphone to find the round stuck in it.

    • My iphone screen is much harder than my other cell phone screen (samsung). The samsung is scratching - the iphone is still glossy.

      So being harder, it may shatter when the phone is dropped the wrong way.

      • My iphone screen is much harder than my other cell phone screen (samsung). The samsung is scratching - the iphone is still glossy.

        So being harder, it may shatter when the phone is dropped the wrong way.

        Engineering tradeoff. I'd rather have a slightly less brittle screen and put a protector over it, personally.

    • by kent_eh (543303)
      Well, the iPhone's screen is actual glass, rather than the plastic or polycarbonate that almost every other phone has always been, so I suspect they are not treating the things any different. They're just made of a more fragile material.
      OTOH, the tijme my iPhone's screen broke. it's because it slipped from my rain-soaked hand onto a tile floor. I maintain that if the thing had a grippy surface anywhere on it, it would never have fallen.

      $100 parts and labour to repair.
  • 86% more glass damage given 100% more glass.

    • by icebike (68054)

      But according to the linked article:

      Our data shows that iPhone 4 owners are reporting accidents 68% more frequently than iPhone 3gs owners.

      iPhone 4 owners reported 82% more damaged screens in the first 4 months compared to iPhone 3gs owners.

      The back is not a screen. There is 68% more accidents, probably attributable to that glass back.

      But when just screen damage is compared, its much worse, 82%.

      It almost appears if the front screen breaks more than the back glass.

    • by v1 (525388)

      the other thing I was wondering is does it have anything to do with the mounting of the glass? I haven't seen an iphone4 closeup yet, but the previous models all had the glass inside a metal rim. The 4 looks a lot like the new imacs, where the glass extends all the way to the edge of the machine. For the imacs, it means if something hits the edge of the machine it's hitting the glass, making the glass a lot more vulnerable to damage. Does the glass come to the edge on the 4?

    • Good point. Having the glass provide structural support increases the chance that the glass will crack due to torsion.
  • That's funny (Score:3, Insightful)

    by pak9rabid (1011935) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:25PM (#33877002)
    I just read an article that states warranty companies are 82% more likely to write biased reviews about products they sell warranties for. Coincidence? Nah, it couldn't be.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Trip6 (1184883)

      Mod parent up. They're just trying to peddle warranties. Surprised nobody followed the money on this submission.

  • by erroneus (253617) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:26PM (#33877006) Homepage

    Unless the glass is breaking all by itself, I'm going to go with "people who spent too much money on a phone don't know how to take proper care of them."

    Fact is, I spent like $100 (and renewed my contract with tmobile) to get a samsung vibrant. The first thing I did was slap a protective case around it and put on a screen protector. Following that, a visit to eBay showed me some nicer things to protect the phone and I also got one of those belt holders for the phone. Why?

    1. I spend what I consider to be a lot of money for a phone.
    2. Things I spend money on, I try to take care of
    3. Keeping a phone in your pocket will cause problems starting with dust and ending with who knows what else
    4. In spite of all the care I want to give it, things fall, slide off, whatever.

    If I had an iPhone (and people who know me know the LOOONG list of reasons why I will never own an iPhone) I would do the same thing to it -- protect the shit out of it. It's frikken expensive and needs to be protected.

    People need to get over complaining about how durable something is or isn't and start simply being careful for a change.

    • by pak9rabid (1011935) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:41PM (#33877168)

      ...and I also got one of those belt holders for the phone. Why?

      Lemme guess, to look like a tool?

      • by erroneus (253617)

        No, because bad things happen to phones kept in pockets.

        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Really, don't do this. Please.

          I'm not saying this to be snarky or mean, and I'm not trolling. Just... don't wear your phone on a belt holder. That's about as bad as a fanny pack.

          Don't walk with a bluetooth earpiece in, either, and especially don't walk around talking to someone on it, making yourself like a schizo.

          Don't wear white socks pulled up to your knees while wearing shorts, either. Nor is the potential safety of a pocket protector worth the certain damage to your reputation. Wear contacts inste

        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          nope. parent was correct.

        • by Timmmm (636430)

          Only if you keep them in the same pocket as keys and loose coins. Obviously. Keep your phone in the other pocket.

      • by SeaFox (739806)

        to look like a tool?

        The phone or the user?

    • by MaWeiTao (908546) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:43PM (#33877196)

      But if it's wrapped in a protector how are you supposed to enjoy the beauty of the industrial design?

      Of course, my feeling is that if you can't design an attractive product that is also durable then you're not a particularly good designer.

      • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @07:17PM (#33877536)

        They've been very big on form over function for some time now. Doesn't mean their devices aren't functional, it just means that they worry about how they look more than anything else and they don't give much thought to if it interferes with working. For example if you look you discover time capsules have a bad habit of dying early, all around the same time. Further research shows this is because they overheat. They cannot take the heat of the integrated powersupply. Well external power would be perfectly doable, most devices have it. However Apple just had to have the sleek, all in one, unit. A fan was not acceptable either, of course. Thus form took precedence over good design and there were functional problems in the end.

        Same shit on the iPhone 4. It isn't like they didn't put function in the device. It is a high end smart phone, no question. However they had to make it pretty, that was requirement #1, and some functionality suffered because of it.

        I really dislike that way of doing things. I'm fine with good looking electronics, things shouldn't have to be ugly but function need to be primary. Make sure everything works first and if the design interferes with that, change it. Make shit work first, look good second.

    • by h4rr4r (612664) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:45PM (#33877210)

      If it needs a case the design is flawed. My Droid goes naked. It has a raised metal edge that protects the screen.

    • by akume325 (1397865) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:46PM (#33877224)
      I gotta agree. I owned a 3G. Never put a case on it but I did have a belt holster. Never dropped it, and it remained intact. I now own a Iphone 4 and I expect the same behavior will allow me to have a crack free screen. It as simple as taking care of your stuff. The other day one of my co workers placed a glass of wine next to her new Macbook Pro. Her 2 yr old was pretending to a major league pitcher through a sock right at the glass splashing the entire glass onto the keyboard. Any idiot who leaves a beverage next to a computer deserves whatever disasters that may strike. Similarly, not taking care of your phone deserves the same. Even the toughest phones can break. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqPGtJUzUx0&feature=player_embedded [youtube.com]
      • by erroneus (253617)

        Yet another reason I won't buy an Apple... in this case, a laptop. Dell offers "accidental damage" coverage. Normally, I skip all warranties as they are typically wasted money. Not so on laptops and they MUST have accidental damage because that is just about the only damage they get! And yes... my sympathy for the wine-spiller woman... within two weeks of getting my new Latitude D830, I spilled apple juice all over it. Broke my heart. Even a day of down time was too much, but I did it on a Friday!! A

    • by colinnwn (677715)
      Where are you getting a Vibrant for $100? Right now if you purchase it on a new 2 year contract or eligible upgrade, it is $200 after instant and mail in rebates. Even if you are a Costco member, the lowest contract price is $130.

      As a guy, I prefer to carry my phone in my pocket to be sure it doesn't get knocked out of a holster, and because seeing middle aged overweight balding men with Blackberries holstered to their side and a Bluetooth headset hanging out of their ear always seemed slightly toolish,
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by gagol (583737)
      I guess you also add a second pair of bumpers to your cars and wrap it in saranwrap to avoid damage to the painting and glasses... seriously, I only buy durable stuff and it pays off. If the devide I buy need care and attention, I prefer to give that time/effort/attention to my children.
    • Unless the glass is breaking all by itself, I'm going to go with "people who spent too much money on a phone don't know how to take proper care of them."

      Fact is, I spent like $100 (and renewed my contract with tmobile) to get a samsung vibrant. The first thing I did was slap a protective case around it and put on a screen protector. Following that, a visit to eBay showed me some nicer things to protect the phone and I also got one of those belt holders for the phone. Why?

      1. I spend what I consider to be a lot of money for a phone.
      2. Things I spend money on, I try to take care of
      3. Keeping a phone in your pocket will cause problems starting with dust and ending with who knows what else
      4. In spite of all the care I want to give it, things fall, slide off, whatever.

      If I had an iPhone (and people who know me know the LOOONG list of reasons why I will never own an iPhone) I would do the same thing to it -- protect the shit out of it. It's frikken expensive and needs to be protected.

      People need to get over complaining about how durable something is or isn't and start simply being careful for a change.

      I spent $600 on my nexus one in February, and have never had a case on it. I have dropped it once, getting out of the car, and it fell about 2 feet. It has one scratch from that, and no more.

      I am a mechanical engineer who also runs our machine shop. I spend a lot of time running prototypes in the shop, and working with hammers, large pieces of steel, sharp cutting tools, and pulling chips of metal out of my hair/pockets/shoes.

      My phone just hangs out in my pocket mostly, though I take it out all the time to

  • Water damage too (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Jaime2 (824950) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:31PM (#33877068)
    The data from the study shows a 42% increase in water damage for the iPhone 4 over the 3GS. From this data we can conclude, with some certainty, that the two bodies of data are fundamentally different and any conclusions drawn on simple differences are only partially caused by differences in the devices themselves.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    "Although to me the chart that I found more surprising was the one that said almost 9% of iPhone 3GS screens crack after a year."

    Try ~6%.

    First, the graph I believe this statement is citing is the "Reported iPhone Accident Rate" Which has an end data point of just under 8%. This is perhaps "almost 8%", but is not close to 9%.

    Second, that graph is all accidents. The chart just down from that labeled "iPhone 3gs" (in a ring-style pie chart) shows the accident breakdown. 76% of the accidents are a cracked scree

  • The only information re: screen breakage on that page is that 76% of accidents are screen breakage, and that 7.8% of 3GS owners report accidents during their first year.

    By my math, that means about 5.9% of screens are breaking on the 3GS.

  • by Thagg (9904) <thadbeier@gmail.com> on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @06:43PM (#33877200) Journal

    Glass is really remarkably strong when it comes out of the furnace. The tensile strength is amazing, it can bend enough to absorb some shocks. It's a great material before it gets to the real world.

    But, once it does, it immediately develops microcracks in the surface, and each of these could be the beginning of a fracture that goes through the bulk of the glass. So, what to do?

    I don't know if they've taken the hint from the semiconductor industry (look up 'strained silicon' [wikipedia.org]) but they did a similar thing with glass. By bombarding the surface of the glass with larger atoms, they create significant stress in the surface, so that any microcracks are immediately pushed shut. But, this is only true down to the level that these atoms diffuse into the surface...not far at all!

    So, if you create a significant scratch (and this might just be 100 microns) you are through this surface, and have a potentially catastrophic failure waiting to happen.

    A screen-protecting film of plastic would be a good investment.

    • by Facegarden (967477) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @08:05PM (#33877964)

      Glass is really remarkably strong when it comes out of the furnace. The tensile strength is amazing, it can bend enough to absorb some shocks. It's a great material before it gets to the real world.

      But, once it does, it immediately develops microcracks in the surface, and each of these could be the beginning of a fracture that goes through the bulk of the glass. So, what to do?

      I don't know if they've taken the hint from the semiconductor industry (look up 'strained silicon' [wikipedia.org]) but they did a similar thing with glass. By bombarding the surface of the glass with larger atoms, they create significant stress in the surface, so that any microcracks are immediately pushed shut. But, this is only true down to the level that these atoms diffuse into the surface...not far at all!

      So, if you create a significant scratch (and this might just be 100 microns) you are through this surface, and have a potentially catastrophic failure waiting to happen.

      A screen-protecting film of plastic would be a good investment.

      I worked at a glass shop for a summer installing windows and doors in peoples houses when I was younger. If it wasn't a brand new house, we'd have to take out the old windows. Often those windows had tempered glass. We took all the old windows back to our shop and threw them in a big trailer for the dump (sadly, window glass isn't as high quality as bottle glass, so it wasn't worth recycling. or thats what they told me).

      Anyway, we loved to break the tempered glass. Normal glass breaks in big sheets, but tempered glass is made for safety, so it is both stronger, and won't break into sheets - it shatters into 1000's of tiny pieces when it breaks, so you can't get stabbed.

      The fun comes with how it breaks. You can hit a 1/4" thick tempered glass window head on with a sledge hammer and it won't break. BUT, tempered glass gets its strength from really high surface tension, which is unbalanced on the edge of the glass. So, after we hit the thing with the sledgehammer and it didn't break, we'd take a regular hammer and lightly tap an exposed edge of the glass, and BOOM, it instantly shattered!

      I don't know how gorilla glass compares to regular tempered glass, but it seems like a bit of a bad design to have the edges exposed like that.

      But then, we knew it was a bad design...
      -Taylor

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Timmmm (636430)

        BUT, tempered glass gets its strength from really high surface tension

        You mean surface compression... The middle of the glass is in tension, and it is protected by the outside surfaces which are in compression (and hence scratch-proof). I never thought about the edges though, that is cool.

  • Q. How do I keep my iPhone screen from breaking?

    A. Stop throwing your phone at your cat.

    Q. What if I don't have a cat?

    A. Then stop throwing it at your bf/gf.

    Q. What if I don't have a boyfriend or a girlfriend?

    A. Get an iPhone 4.

  • Let us work though the numbers. At four months, the iPhone 4 has a return rate of 47 phones per thousand. According to the graph, 82% of this was due to broken glass, so this is 39 phones per thousand whose glass broke. The iPhone 3GS had a return rate of 28 phones per thousand at that time, 76% were broken screen, or may 21 phones.

    Of course the iPhone has two pieces of glass to break instead of one, so, for the careless consumer who has insurance because they want to break the phone and get a new one

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by semiotec (948062)

      What is all this apologetics?

      Are you telling me that it's Squaretrade's fault that iPhone 4 has twice as much glass and is twice as likely to break?

      I don't see you arguing that the numbers they provided are wrong, so how are they being deceptive? They simply reported that in the 4 months since iPhone 4 came out, almost twice as many suffer breakages as 3GS, which is numbers from their own customers. I totally fail to see how this is deceptive.

      Do you mean they should have reported a lower (and false) n

  • ... Is this the same Gorilla Glass that's in my Cowon S9? Because I *sat* on it once (oops) and it broke the AMOLED screen (cry) but not the gorilla glass on top. I've seen the videos of someone attacking it with forks and coins and stuff too. That shit is seriously tough. So did Apple buy the generic brand of it or what? How the hell are people cracking it without destroying the rest of the damn phone?

  • "In SquareTrade's previous study comparing smart phone reliability from November 2008, we found iPhones to be far more reliable than Blackberrys and Palm Treos. We will be updating this report soon, and we'll have data on the latest Android phone models. It may yet be seen that even with the double glass, the iPhone has an overall failure rate that is still better than the competition."
  • They really were holding it wrong?

  • Cell phones get abused, simple as that. You have people who would not normally use anything more advanced than a TV remote that have high end smartphones these days. And such people, and not a shot at them just saying, often don't have the mindset of treating high end portable electronics with a bit more care. To them something that you can throw in your purse or pocket should be able to take massive amounts of abuse.

    And by in large I would say that modern cell phones do! Phones get dropped, dropped in

  • by failedlogic (627314) on Tuesday October 12, 2010 @07:45PM (#33877798)

    I am awaiting the announcement of an Apple Special Event on this problem soon.

    At the event Mr. Jobs will bash with a hammer the screens of competing cell phones from RIM, Motorola, Sony, Nokia, etc. The results of this vigorous laboratory testing will be presented with a pie-chart to show that the iPhone screen is more resistant to hammer blows as long as you hold the hammer carefully with a finger or two and not grip it with your whole hand.

           

  • Well, Is glass exactly the best option for a device that will be inevitably dropped. I like my iPhone 4 but I immediately bought the case Apple should have design around so I could be more careless with this thing
  • by dindi (78034)

    Shocking news ... metal covered glass breaks easier than the one surrounded with thick plastic.

    Look at the 3G/3GS, and compare it to the first iPhone (on which I saw some broken screens) and the iPhone 4....

    I think the new design looks spectacular, still I would 100x prefer my 3GS with the 4's features than the actual 4.

    I actually think, that a iPhone 4 with the plastic bumper is still more vulnerable to side impacts than a 3G/GS without a protector.

    Just my 2c ...

    An other factor : if you have big hands, y

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