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Iphone Privacy Apple

Apple Wants To Share Your Location With Others 248

Posted by kdawson
from the leaving-more-than-virtual-tracks dept.
Farhood sends in this snip from the LA Times: "In an updated version of its privacy policy, the company added a paragraph noting that once users agree, Apple and unspecified 'partners and licensees' may collect and store user location data. When users attempt to download apps or media from the iTunes store, they are prompted to agree to the new terms and conditions. Until they agree, they cannot download anything through the store. The company says the data is anonymous and does not personally identify users. Analysts have shown, however, that large, specific data sets can be used to identify people based on behavior patterns." Mashable and The Consumerist have picked up on this collection and sharing of "precise location data, including the real-time geographic location of your Apple computer or device."
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Apple Wants To Share Your Location With Others

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  • Beh (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Hognoxious (631665) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @05:21AM (#32650720) Homepage Journal

    s/share/sell/

    s/with/to/

  • by mjwx (966435) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @05:24AM (#32650738)
    Isn't this exactly what we lambaste Google for?

    In an updated version of its privacy policy, the company added a paragraph noting that once users agree, Apple and unspecified 'partners and licensees' may collect and store user location data.

    Well not quite, Google does not explicitly state they are planning on selling your data.

    When users attempt to download apps or media from the iTunes store, they are prompted to agree to the new terms and conditions. Until they agree, they cannot download anything through the store.

    Does anyone still wonder why it is bad to be beholden to a single supply chain?

    So Apple does not want you to have freedom or respects your privacy.

  • by MrHanky (141717) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @05:41AM (#32650826) Homepage Journal

    It's different from Google like this: Quoting Cory Doctorow: "This is different from Android, in that Google does not gather your information unless you opt in, and if you do opt in, you can opt out later.

    "By contrast, Apple gathers your information without asking you to opt in, and does not present you with the option of opting out.

    "What's more, Apple is presenting these new terms retrospectively. People who bought iPads and iPods on the understanding that they could be used without having their location information gathered and shared now find that they *must* allow this information to be gathered and shared (I suppose you could try not updating iTunes, but then you would also have to not upgrade your OS -- OS upgrades come with iTunes upgrades -- and be prepared to be locked out of the app store, and since Apple's use of DRM prevents third parties from putting apps on your devices, you're fundamentally abandoning any hope of loading any code, even third-party code, onto your iPad and iPod)."

    Of course, he may or may not be correct.

  • by SupremoMan (912191) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @05:46AM (#32650850)

    Yes but if a cell phone carrier tried to do this, they would lose plenty of consumers to the competing carriers.

  • by Shivetya (243324) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @06:00AM (#32650914) Homepage Journal

    and you find yourself not able to get updates of any sort. Since the "i" devices are so intertwined with iTunes it pretty much guarantees you will have to keep current eventually. Having an opt out on what is nearly mandatory software isn't much an opt out is it.

  • Re:Beh (Score:0, Insightful)

    by Deus.1.01 (946808) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @06:12AM (#32650956) Journal

    "Wouldnt a mochafrapparasberrychino hit the spot right now? Lucky for you there is a starbucks only two blocks away!"

    I take back what i said about Apple, they do know how to innovate.

  • by mrsurb (1484303) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @06:23AM (#32651000)

    Read the parent that you're responding to! His point is that Apple is applying these terms to people AFTER they have bought the phone. It's an automatic opt-in unless you want to go to a lot of effort to sit outside Apple's walled garden, at which point you lose a big proportion of the value of the phone that you have already paid for.

    For new customers, sure it's opt-in/opt-out, buy Apple or not. But if you do, don't be surprised at the next swift one that Apple pulls.

  • by silanea (1241518) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @06:24AM (#32651010)
    Which part of "retroactive" needs to be explained to you? They change the license not just for new customers but also for existing users, effectively rendering their devices useless as far as many advertised features are concerned unless they agree to the new terms.
  • by AHuxley (892839) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @06:26AM (#32651022) Homepage Journal
    lol "It's even better than reading an Apple press release"
  • by Deus.1.01 (946808) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @06:41AM (#32651076) Journal

    Whether you agree to be put under slavery or not its still a pretty shitty gig that you should avoid by any standard.

    *before someone have to ask; no I don't think buying Apple products is on the same level as voluntary slavery.

  • by MrHanky (141717) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @06:45AM (#32651096) Homepage Journal

    Certainly. But people really need to be made aware that they should not buy from Apple if they don't want to be spied on. Don't you agree?

    Of course you don't: if you did, you wouldn't cough up that bullshit pseudoargument of "don't buy it if you don't like it" (i.e.: "stop complaining, as no one forces you to buy it").

  • by kangsterizer (1698322) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @06:52AM (#32651150)

    You're missing the point dear fanboy nr 9283476573,5 (yeah you're a half person, at least these numbers say so! sry!)

    The point is that this policy _did not exist when you bought the phone_, you are then FORCED to accept the new policy if you want to be able to get more apps, or just updates the ones you own. Oh yeah, you can also sell the phone for a lesser value than you paid for it, and likely you're subsidized so you're going to have to pay a new one full price like $500 or $600 (while your subscription to AT&T still makes you pay money for the first iPhone of course!).

    Basically, owned by Apple (yet again).

    Got it yet?

  • by dmbasso (1052166) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @07:08AM (#32651224)

    Naive. :)

    A very good friend once told me: "If you put your balls in their hands, don't complain if they decide to squeeze them". That was almost ten years ago, and he was referring to Microsoft, but see how it fits perfectly with a lot of companies, including Apple.

  • by Yvanhoe (564877) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @07:11AM (#32651236) Journal
    How do you know they are not already doing this ?
  • Free Market BS (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Comboman (895500) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @08:08AM (#32651518)

    I understand being upset but I was responding to opt-in and opt-out, and it's pretty simple - your dollars are your vote for you and how serious you are. The last thing I want to see is a bunch of people up in arms saying we need laws to prevent this. I call BS on that.

    And I call BS on your free market democracy ("your dollars are your vote"). You're right about one thing though; we don't need new laws to prevent this. We need the old laws that allow companies to lock down devices that their customers own (DMCA, etc) removed so that we have a real Free market.

  • by goombah99 (560566) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @08:11AM (#32651538)

    It's not necessarily the same thing that google does.

    When you install an app that uses location data then the app almost certainly already knows exactly who you are, no inferences needed. So the question is not if apps are accessing your location data but if apple is downloading it to the mothership and selling this to third parties whose apps you did not purchase. However there that daya may or may not be processed before handing over. For example, if they hand over a string of locations and times you visit (the bagel shop, starbucks, the metro, the work place, the home then that associated sequence probably nails you uniquely. If they instead hand over a historgram of city block vistis that aggregate over all users and don't link the records then this data will be fairly anonymous aside from edge cases (e.g. perhaps they can figure out you are indeed the bridge tender on the brooklyn bridge.) So it depends on what level of correlation they are handing over and if it's to third parties or apps that you installed.

    Every time I install a googls chrome plugin I cringe cause it tells me it needs access to my browsing history and bookmarks. But then I relax slightly because at least I'm choosing to install this not have it handed over to third parties. What I worry more about is the google searches themselves. that string of associates goes to google and I suspect they are indeed correlating these.

  • by dotfile (536191) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @09:22AM (#32652152)
    There's a big difference, I think you might agree, between "complete strangers see me with my pint" and "a man in a suit follows me everywhere, noting the exact time, date and location wherever I go. He's always there, there 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, following me. He also keeps records of every phone call i make, every song I listen to, every message I send and every web page I visit."

    One of these, you see, is normal human social behavior. The other is more than a little creepy, and something most of us would never put up with. But, if you give your permission I guess you're OK with it as long as you get a beer coupon.
  • by farble1670 (803356) on Tuesday June 22, 2010 @11:05AM (#32653488)

    Who tells you that might be happening if you have an Android phone?

    wrong.

    on android, and app must explicitly declare the services it needs to access in its manifest, and those permission are shown to to the user before they install the app. that includes permission to obtain the user's location.

Whenever people agree with me, I always think I must be wrong. - Oscar Wilde

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