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Rumor — AT&T Losing iPhone Exclusivity Next Week 353

Posted by Soulskill
from the can-we-terminate-luke-wilson-now dept.
MojoKid writes "An inside source over at HotHardware reports that AT&T will lose their iPhone exclusivity on 1/27, coincident with Apple's upcoming press event next week, though it's not yet clear what other carriers will be stepping in to pick up the iPhone. For anyone who has followed the saga, you may notice that you haven't seen AT&T fighting to extend their original exclusive agreement as of late. In fact, they have spent most of their time fighting Verizon's negative ad campaigns. This may not be all that surprising. Inside of AT&T, word is that the iPhone is causing more trouble than ever before. On some level, having the iPhone is hurting AT&T's image. Do you remember hearing about AT&T's 'horrible network' before the iPhone? The iPhone itself doesn't really handle the switch from 3G to EDGE very gracefully, so calls that are in-progress tend to fail whenever 3G connections aren't optimal and the phone attempts to step down to EDGE. It seems that AT&T may finally be tired of taking the heat."
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Rumor — AT&T Losing iPhone Exclusivity Next Week

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  • by davidwr (791652) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:13AM (#30877952) Homepage Journal

    "iPhone, you phone, we all phone for iPhone"

    Well, maybe before AT&T's woes.

  • About time... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by CrazeeCracker (641868) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:14AM (#30877956) Homepage
    ...a fair amount of other countries already have multiple carriers for the iPhone. Let's hope this stirs up some competition.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Xenious (24845)

      Of course other countries have mobile networks that all use the same frequency and technology. Only here in the US are we blessed with 2 diggerent HSPA frequencies and CDMA networks. I suggest the CDMA networks change over all their towers and join the real world. ;)

      • by Ironsides (739422)

        I suggest the CDMA networks change over all their towers and join the real world. ;)

        I'm going to address this on a serious note, as a lot of people do feel this way. CDMA is being replaced by LTE. LTE is the equivalent of HSPA from what I read. So, I guess you could say they are joining the real world.

        That said, do you want everyone on the same technology or the companies trying out what they believe is the best technology and having the customers deciding which network they like the best? Seriously, I'm not sure of any better migration plans.

        Disclaimer: I use my phone as a phone.

    • by jimicus (737525)

      If the UK is anything to go by, it doesn't necessarily help much. O2 and Orange both sell the iPhone for virtually the same price on very similar contracts.

      Knowing Apple, it wouldn't surprise me at all if they're responsible for this.

  • Verizon (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Salo2112 (628590) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:14AM (#30877960)
    If Verizon gets the iPhone, I'll be there next week.
    • by goombah99 (560566)

      Verizon is going to get the ipad tablet not the iphone.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by TroyM (956558)

      I can't see Apple going to the trouble to develop a CDMA iPhone when Verizon is already starting to deploy LTE. I wouldn't be surprised if the next generation iPhone is available on Verizon, but not next week.

      • It'll take years to roll out a stable LTE network that is as large as their 3G CDMA network. In iPhone time that is over 2 generations of iPhones that they'd lose sales on. Believe me, if there is a Verizon iPhone out within the next year it will either be CDMA only or both CDMA and GSM.

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      If Boost Mobile gets the iPhone, I'll buy one the day it comes out, or the day I get back from my vacation, whichever comes first. Contract? Do not want. Featureful smartphone on a $50/mo unlimited plan? Want very much.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The iPhone itself doesn't really handle the switch from 3G to EDGE very gracefully

    That's GSM's fault, not the phone's.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by CptPicard (680154)

      Funny how in the past couple of decades using Nokia GSM phones on a Finnish carrier, I've never experienced a single "dropped call". It's amazing this happens in the US.

      • by wumpus188 (657540) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @11:49AM (#30878634)

        No wonder, when the whole country population is about a half of NYC (5.5 vs 9 millions)

        • by CptPicard (680154)

          Maybe, but I do hear about this kind of stuff from all over the US. It's the some sort of data transmission per area measure that is relevant, and NYC is a bit of an extreme example... when one hits a relatively unprepared network (you guys did get on the bandwagon just in the past few years) with iPhone data transmission requirements, I guess you could assume problems.

          It is, I would suppose, still fundamentally an iPhone issue though...

          • by DrDitto (962751) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @12:56PM (#30879342)
            The USA really has extremes in population density. We have NYC and we have North Dakota. This is why CDMA was, at one time, the favored technology here in the U.S. GSM cell sizes are fixed at 45km. CDMA can go much larger (for greater coverage area, less capacity), and of course, can also go much smaller (for higher capacity).

            It is no wonder that Verizon has the best coverage in North America.

            Of course you can make a reliable GSM network that covers a vast area and has high capacity. It just costs a lot of money.
          • by Attila Dimedici (1036002) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @01:15PM (#30879490)
            You see the thing is, a carrier in Finland only has to compete with another carrier in Finland. In the U.S., you have to cover the whole country if you want to compete. Are there any carriers who offer the same level of service for the same price no matter where one goes in Europe?
            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by CptPicard (680154)

              Fair point; in particular price-wise, competition doesn't really work yet in the common market in Europe. Roaming charges can be surprisingly high. When it comes to both competition to push down prices and carrier co-operation in providing reliable infrastructure, I would say it would be probably pretty hard to replicate Europe-wide.

        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward

          15 years ago I drove through Austria, Switzerland and Italy. I drove through the Alps and made crystal clear calls to the US in deep canyons in the middle of nowhere and never dropped a call. It has nothing to do with the population of the country because it relates to the number and location of towers relative to the number of users. Europe has a higher density of cell phone users than the US, so they should in theory have more network problems, but they don't. Cell phone service just works. You don't get

          • It comes down to the simple fact that Americans want good cell phone coverage, but they don't want a tower in their neighborhood. It's a catch-22.

            • by DarkDust (239124) <marc@darkdust.net> on Sunday January 24, 2010 @01:01PM (#30879376) Homepage

              People don't want them here in Europe, either, at least on the countryside. People don't care about them in the cities, I think. At least I never heard somebody even talking about these towers here in Munich, except if the reception is bad.

              There was a very funny story a few weeks back here in Germany (I'm citing off the top of my head, maybe I don't get it 100% correct, sorry for that): A company erected a new cell tower and people began to complain about health issues like headaches that they directly blamed to the tower. After a few weeks there was some kind of meeting between the people and company officials where the people demanded that the tower gets switched off immediately because of their health problems. Turned out the company switched the tower off three weeks before said meeting due to some technical problems :-) Fine example of a negative placebo, IMHO.

      • by Anubis350 (772791)
        I hate AT&Ts service, dont get me wrong. I get lots of dropped calls, mostly when driving. However, a lot of those are rather long distance. While I realize finland is ~900 miles from tip to tip, I also know very few people travel anywhere near that distance on any form of regular basis. Here in the US 100-200 mile commutes are not uncommon. My daily commute is 70 miles, each way - and most of the dropped calls I get are on longer drives than that. Driving from NYC to Ft. Lauderdale, FL (a drive I've do
        • by CptPicard (680154)

          Heh, I am not looking for a "OMG Europe for teh win" pissing contest.. ;) It's just interesting that robustness of the cellphone network is something we take so totally for granted here, that it feels weird to read about "calls dropped" as some sort of real measure of network performance.

          Finland's population density is also actually quite low anywhere north of Tampere -- you don't get 3G in the woods, but basic EDGE/GSM works pretty much always. The interesting measure is the people's data needs served per

      • I can count the number of dropped calls I've had on Verizon over the past 8 years or so on my hands. The issue is AT&T, T-Mobile, and other poor quality carriers, not something inherent to the United States.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by JAK (6169)
      Regarding the dropped call when switching between 3G and Edge: I can't speak to the underlying cause, but over the past few years I've had a Palm Treo and a blackberry that did this constantly (Dallas area was especially bad). From my personal experience, the iPhone seems to do this less than these older phones.
    • Not really. (Score:4, Informative)

      by IANAAC (692242) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @11:14AM (#30878354)

      That's GSM's fault, not the phone's.

      Maybe due to the US-implementation of GSM, but GSM can handle this just fine.

      You don't see this problem in Europe.

      • by russotto (537200)

        Maybe due to the US-implementation of GSM, but GSM can handle this just fine.

        Specifically, the _AT&T_ implementation of GSM. Which sort of throws the problem right back to them.

    • by MobyTurbo (537363)
      It's hard to have sympathy for AT&T not having enough infrastructure to deal with the iPhone when they had a profit well over 3 billion dollars last quarter, and have spent less on infrastructure over the past year than on previous years.
  • by Ritz_Just_Ritz (883997) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:23AM (#30878000)

    I work in NYC and have the choice between Verizon and ATT for my "company" phone service. I use the data features fairly frequently and when our group of 40-50 folks sits down and chats (we're pretty equally divided between ATT and Verizon users) it seems to me that ATT data service is usually faster and more reliable. Of the people who are most vocal about their Verizon support there, they seem to be mostly voice users and only casual data users.

    As far as the iPhone goes, I'd MUCH rather have a Nexus One if I was in the market for a fancy smart phone.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by dachshund (300733)

      As far as the iPhone goes, I'd MUCH rather have a Nexus One if I was in the market for a fancy smart phone.

      What is it about the Nexus One that's got people so worked up? As best I can tell it's a great piece of hardware with a UI that's (admittedly by Android fans) only about 95% as good as the iPhone. It's manufactured by a company that doesn't really have any experience making phones, and could easily get out of the business, leaving you high and dry.

      In any case, it's about 180 degrees out of sync from

      • by mejogid (1575619) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @11:19AM (#30878382)

        The Nexus One is manufactured by HTC, not Google - they have a lot of experience making OEM phones (many of the network-branded phones of the last 15 or so years were designed & built by them).

        As for software, it's give and take - I like Android for the multiple concurrent apps (allows some very clever add-on features, such as automatically switching on your wifi when the cell identifier indicates you're in an area you normally use it), the widgets (especially calendar), the open app store (so emulators and alternate browsers are allowed) and the google integration & syncing. On the other hand, the app ecosystem isn't as good as the iPhone and the UI isn't always as fluid/good looking.

        Depending on your use case, I can see how Android could be far better suited.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by kurt555gs (309278)

        Or, go look at a Nokia N900. I find it amazing how little press this wonderful mobile computer that has phone functions is getting. I have been a fone freak for years, the N900 is like the parting of the Red Sea in a CB DeMille movie.

      • by Reemi (142518)

        What is it about the iPhone that's got people so worked up? As best I can tell it's a great UI experience with crappy hardware that's got only about 75% of the functionality that any other phone has. It's manufactured by a company that doesn't really have any experience making phones, and could easily get out of the phone business, leaving you high and dry.

  • Verizon iPhone (Score:4, Interesting)

    by chrisgeleven (514645) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:24AM (#30878014) Homepage

    My AT&T contract is up on July 12th. I tell you, I am going to have a very difficult decision on that date if a Verizon version of the iPhone hasn't been announced or released by then. While I love my iPhone, the AT&T service is just not reliable at all in my experience in New Hampshire, especially if you get out of the major cities. You pretty much have to be in a deep cave to not have a Verizon cell phone signal here.

    My thinking is if there is no sign of a Verizon version of the iPhone by July 12th when my contract is up, I may very well switch to a Nexus One or Droid. It is sure going to be tempting.

    • Re:Verizon iPhone (Score:4, Insightful)

      by wwphx (225607) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @12:52PM (#30879292) Homepage
      Doesn't your contract go month-to-month at that point? Can't you just continue to pay your normal monthly and wait for a carrier switch to happen? I'd wait before switching to a different carrier and getting locked in to another contract, only to find a couple of months later that the carrier that you want now offers it.
    • "in a cave": true (Score:4, Interesting)

      by raddan (519638) * on Sunday January 24, 2010 @04:32PM (#30881794)
      I can confirm this. I was winter backpacking with my father last weekend in the White Mountains of NH. Normally, with AT&T, I get no cellphone reception whatsoever there (with the one odd occurrence of 5 bars near Wildcat-- but I suspect that both Mt. Washington and Wildcat have antennas on them), so upon reaching the parking spot in Franconia Notch and confirming that I had no signal, I just left the phone in my Jeep. However, that night at our campsite at Kinsman Pond, my father realized that he had forgotten to leave his phone in the car. For fun, he flipped it on, and, hey-- three bars! My mom was treated to a MMS picture of a deep woods winter wonderland. My dad has Verizon.

      When you consider that the trees around us were covered in nearly a foot of ice and snow, and we were sleeping in a shelter with several feet of snow on top of it, we really were in a cave. Amazing.
  • AT&T Sucks (Score:5, Informative)

    by Derpnooner (1606505) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:24AM (#30878018) Homepage
    Howdy, I worked with AT&T/Cingular right at the release and that is when "it" happened. From what I was told, AT&T reduced the range of their network to make data transmission more "reliable" for the iPhone, and in so doing, they pissed off a number of end users. We had so many complaints from people about their service no longer working in their homes, work, etc. I was there for the switch to 3G in OH and though the service is fast, the batteries don't last (heh); my phone(s) would be dead with very limited surfing. Oh well, maybe AT&T will rebrand again - back to Cingular and become completely Open Source... and monkeys might flight out of my butt. Bye iPhone.
    • Re:AT&T Sucks (Score:5, Interesting)

      by morgan_greywolf (835522) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:41AM (#30878132) Homepage Journal

      I was there for the switch to 3G in OH and though the service is fast, the batteries don't last (heh); my phone(s) would be dead with very limited surfing.

      The batteries don't last in a lot of EVDO phones either. That's the fault of stupid phone manufacturers who switched radio chipsets without bothering to improve battery capacity or power consumption in the rest of the phone.

      The real problem seems to be that AT&T has very limited 3G coverage, while their EDGE network has very good coverage. Unfortunately, as you allude to, they had to degrade the EDGE network for the 3G iPhone. The 3G-EDGE failover problems actually have nothing to do with the iPhone and everything to do with GSM. This has never worked very well, not even in other dual band phones. EVDO to CDMA fails over pretty seamlessly, though in the very early days of EVDO back around 2005 or so, several phones (like the Moto Razr) had problems failing over as well.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by cgenman (325138)

        Do you remember hearing about AT&T's 'horrible network' before the iPhone?

        As a longtime AT&T customer, I've always had problems on AT&T's network, but they weren't terrible enough to warrant worrying about. GSM coverage over California started out pretty spotty outside of major population centers, with roaming charges (or no coverage) throughout large swaths of driving between the Silicon Valley and Los Angeles. When launched, their internet access services were just spotty and terrible.

        Later

  • by SuperBanana (662181) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:24AM (#30878020)

    The iPhone itself doesn't really handle the switch from 3G to EDGE very gracefully, so calls that are in-progress tend to fail whenever 3G connections aren't optimal and the phone attempts to step down to EDGE.

    Given that carriers test phones on networks, it would not be the least surprising to learn that AT&T technical staff evaluated the iPhone (or already had experience with the 'modem' it uses), told management about the problems, and management decided what was more important was the couple of years of revenue from people who wanted iPhones regardless of the network.

    I've been a customer of AT&T since the "AT&T wireless" days (pre AT&T, pre "cingular", etc.) and I can count the number of dropped calls on one hand. I currently have an original iPhone, jailbroken/unlocked, on a very old AT&T Wireless account. $30/month for a regional plan = awesome (as is having one device to surf the web where I can get Wifi, play games, listen to music, and make phone calls.)

    Living in New England, I also haven't heard many complaints from 3G iPhone users. Seems to be mostly NYC where people are screaming (yes kids, NY and NYC are not "New England.")

    • You're absolutely correct when talking about management versus engineering. Management wins, and so does shiny. Just look at the Nexus One. It's THE Google phone, but you get terrible customer support. But besides that, your concept of reality is skewed.

      I've been a customer of AT&T since the "AT&T wireless" days (pre AT&T, pre "cingular", etc.) and I can count the number of dropped calls on one hand. I currently have an original iPhone, jailbroken/unlocked, on a very old AT&T Wireless account. $30/month for a regional plan = awesome (as is having one device to surf the web where I can get Wifi, play games, listen to music, and make phone calls.)

      Your wireless account has nothing to do with network quality. Secondly, you have illegally voided your contract, ruling you out from any legitimate apples to apples comparison.

      Living in New England, I also haven't heard many complaints from 3G iPhone users. Seems to be mostly NYC where people are screaming (yes kids, NY and NYC are not "New England.")

      So you're saying that between New England and NYC, your user report has been that

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Doogie (1550)

      That's nice.

      I also live in "New England" and travel around the region for work. I can't begin to list all the dropped calls I've had in the last week alone, even around the Boston area. There's still huge sections of VT/NH/ME that have zero ATT coverage at all, nevermind 3g. At this point I really don't care who is at fault, I'm just done with the iPhone/ATT.

    • by Ibag (101144) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:59AM (#30878256)

      Well, if we're going based on anecdotal evidence, I've been an AT&T customer since they merged with Cingular, and while I can't remember how the network was when I was living in New England, since I moved to Chicago, I haven't had a call over 20 minutes that didn't get dropped at least once. I don't have an iPhone, just a regular non-smartphone, so it's not just NY and it's not just iPhones.

      (as for why I am still a customer when they suck so hard if I don't have an iPhone, a family member gets a discounted family plan through work, and everybody else in the family has an iPhone, but I would change carriers if there were not extenuating circumstances.)

    • by jjo (62046)

      I have an iPhone and it's OK in the Boston area, but I'm fairly often in central New Hampshire, and AT&T sucks big time. A few months ago, I had to take my wife to the emergency room, and wait for several hours. Inside the Laconia hospital, my iPhone signal was zero, zippo, nada. My wife's Verizon phone had a 4-bar signal strength. While both AT&T and Verizon have dead zones, AT&T's seem to be much more prevalent.

      I laugh when I see AT&T's claims of having the "fastest" network. It's

  • AT&T hates the iPhone now? Why?

    Perhaps because they know Apple does not intend to renew its contract with AT&T?

  • Uh, excuse me? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:27AM (#30878046)

    Because they are the only company to carry it, and it's such a data hog, it's largely to blame for AT&T's network troubles. We don't remember hearing about AT&T's "horrible network" before the iPhone--do you?

    Doesn't matter. AT&T made an agreement with Apple, they made contracts with users - really one sided contracts - to handle this. To blame a product and consumers for AT&T's short sightedness, mismanagement, and desire to squeeze every last penny out of their subscribers and their system is ridiculous.

    AT&T got the business and they didn't live up to their end of the bargain.

    Period.

    • Re:Uh, excuse me? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ceoyoyo (59147) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:49AM (#30878182)

      It's also not a problem with either the iPhone or the users. The phone works just fine on other carriers' networks in other countries.

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Not true. At least in Finland (Sonera's network) iPhone is a total fail when it comes to being a phone. You get dropped from the network daily even in central Helsinki. I've never before had such problems and I've been a cell user since 97.

      • Re:Uh, excuse me? (Score:4, Interesting)

        by j741 (788258) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @02:27PM (#30880326) Journal

        Here in Calgary, Alberta, Canada I have zero network (Rogers wireless) connection problems with my iPhone, however when I took that same phone to Houston, Texas, U.S.A. (with data roaming turned off) it connected to the AT&T network for roaming and my phone calls were routinely disconnected at random. Sometimes I would be only able to say hello and speak a few words before the call would be lost and I needed to redial. This pissed me off something fierce. I'm not surprised people are not happy with the AT&T network in the U.S.A.

  • Sigh (Score:5, Insightful)

    by slasho81 (455509) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:33AM (#30878086)
    So why didn't you wait till next week to publish a verified fact?
    • They can get more page views by publishing the rumor now and the real story then... assuming there is a story, of course.

    • Re:Sigh (Score:5, Interesting)

      by DaveGod (703167) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @11:07AM (#30878306)

      By next week many people may have signed up with AT&T whom, had they known, would have waited to check for better deals / a preferred carrier.

      Don't hold your breath though. The situation in the UK after the iPhone recently became non-exclusive is a bunch of remarkably similar deals [moneysavingexpert.com], the only notable exception being that Tesco offers a 12 month contract.

    • by teg (97890)

      So why didn't you wait till next week to publish a verified fact?

      1. Normally, if you do it this way you get to post both the rumour and the story. This increases pageviews, comments and revenue...
      2. In this case, chances are small for this happening. Thus, you wouldn't get to post anything at all.
  • I wonder if it'll finally be possible to get an unlocked iPhone(in USA) without paying $600+ for it now.
  • Verified (Score:5, Informative)

    by deadend44 (1728576) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @10:45AM (#30878166)
    My fiance works for an AT&T reseller and just verified that they are losing exclusivity this week.
  • In theory, you could take an AT&T iPhone to T-mobile, as they are also based on GSM, but I remember a couple weeks ago when the Nexus One launched, people pointing out that AT&T and T-Mo use different frequency bands for their 3G service, and so the Nexus One could only be used on AT&T with the slower 2G data channel. I'm guessing the same issue would be in play here, going the other way? That is, you could use an iPhone on T-Mo, but you'd not be able to get 3G data speeds?

    • Correct.

      So even if AT&T loses their exclusivity, there won't be a big shift in the market so long as there's only a GSM phone. It won't work on T-Mobile's 3G network, so a T-Mobile iPhone would be very unattractive for most users.

    • by MobyTurbo (537363)
      Correct, unless the phone supports both American 3g bands, you'll lose 3g with your unlocked iPhone or any other GSM phone in the US. In Europe, the situation is different, as the EU forced all the carriers there to use the same standard for frequencies; GSM and 3g. (Their 3g is yet another 3g standard, different than both the ones used in the US, so don't get imported unlocked phones from there unless you want to lose 3g unless they support your US standard), and as a result, there's a lot less carrier loc
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by qwertyatwork (668720)
      I have an iPhone with t-mobile and no 3g doesn't work. Different radio frequencies. PLEASE someone prove I'm wrong show me how I can get 3g working on my iPhone :)
  • Droid vs iPhone (Score:5, Informative)

    by adairw (1338775) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @11:04AM (#30878294)
    I have a Droid on Verizon and my girlfriend just got an iPhone on at&t. Nearly all my friends have iPhones and honestly I've always wanted one. However I didn't want to carry two att phones, as my work provides me a phone. So I've stuck with alltel/verizon for my personal phone. As a self proclaimed nerd I really enjoy what I can do on my android device and I see a ton of potential in the future but as far as end to end experience goes, the iPhone's interface is a lot cleaner/smoother. As far as apps go on android I've found just about everything I want as far as apps go. Even most of the ones my friends have on iPhone. One thing I really like about my droid is the quality of the calls both on speaker and on the hand set. Sounds really nerdy but I have a friend who works for a bank and he also has a droid, before he got it if he was in his server room on the phone I could hear the noise from all the servers and other equipment...Not with his droid, it sounded DEAD quiet. I kept asking him if he was really in the server room and he kept laughing at me saying he was. I like at&t and the iphone, I also like android and verizon. When it came down to it for me I wanted something new, not what everyone else had.
    • Re:Droid vs iPhone (Score:4, Interesting)

      by bogaboga (793279) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @11:23AM (#30878404)

      Sounds really nerdy but I have a friend who works for a bank and he also has a droid, before he got it if he was in his server room on the phone I could hear the noise from all the servers and other equipment...Not with his droid, it sounded DEAD quiet.

      May be it has this this chip [audience.com] which is doing wonders on Google's Nexus One.

  • Hmmm.... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by rinoid (451982) * on Sunday January 24, 2010 @11:07AM (#30878310)
    You sure can smell it can't you? The smell of troll bait in the morning ...

    The iPhone is fine, so fine it's sold 10 million units. It works just fine.

    Before the iPhone we had the choice between crap and crappy and a decent RIM device. Please don't tell me about your Treo.
    After the iPhone we have a few choices of very good, very smart devices.

    The post is a rumor which doesn't suit /. as many have pointed out ... but most of the replies are trolls who feel it's their duty to point out how much the iPhone sucks, the users are idiots, or if only it ran Linux wouldn't the world be a whole lot better?

    I can't wait for the announcement to see what new device or new services are potentially opened up. I don't care to prognosticate but it'd be nice to have open carrier choices among all handsets -- but this has never really been the case. Thanks to innovation and a little more pressure from Google openly stating this as their goal it may happen. Just like DRM and iTunes where so many needed to blame Apple, call the service shit, call the device shit, it's happening with ATT, carrier lock-in, and the iPhone.


    Troll bait hoo-ha-ha!
    • by Shados (741919)

      The Xbox 360 sold over 30 million units.

      While i never had any problems with mine, would you look at me in the eyes and say that "The Xbox 360 works fine"?

      Yup, thought so.

  • Apple should start selling iPhones optionally unlocked, at a higher price if need be. People will STILL queue up to buy it, that's how popular it has become. Those who may have shunned it because of AT&T and who also couldn't be bothered with the jailbreak hassles would return to buy it.
    And they have no hope in hell of significantly penetrating other more open markets(like mine, India where we've long since been accustomed to buying our phones at full price independent of any operator restrictions) unle

  • by EvlG (24576) on Sunday January 24, 2010 @11:34AM (#30878488)

    I have wondered if ATT is a victim of their own success with 3G congestion. They largely sold the iPhone on the merits of all the cool data features and these users consume a lot of wireless data. 3G networks aren't designed to handle many concurrent heavy users. So I wonder, if Verizon gets the iPhone and folks make the switch, will the situation just naturally improve for ATT? Will Verizon suddenly feel the pain of all those heavy users?

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by adairw (1338775)
      I doubt it, I think the verizon network in general is better built. If they started feeling the squeez I think verizon would invest money into the network instead of ignoring it.
  • My contract is set to renew, and I wanted to get a new iphone 3gs, and the ATT site doesn't even offer the iphone as an option.

    I suspect that not only did they lose exclusivity, they may not even be worthy of distributing iphones anymore.

  • I have the option to switch from my blackberry to the iphone... the only thing holding me back is whether or not a new one will be announced next week... Would you buy now or wait? If the rumors are true, OLED, 5MP camera, flash but the ship date wasn't until June would you wait or just get it now?

  • > The iPhone itself doesn't really handle the switch from 3G to EDGE very gracefully, so calls that are in-progress tend to fail whenever 3G connections aren't optimal and the phone attempts to step down to EDGE.

    since the voice and data decks are separate; the voice isn't *going* over the data connection, so a roam there shouldn't affect a voice call.

    Now, that doesn't mean that it's not having *other* problems roaming from cell to cell; I just don't expect that to be the cause.

  • Time to buy Apple and short AT&T.

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